Tag Archives: MIT Libraries

Celebrate Pride

Pride Rainbow Flag
It’s Pride Month! 
Check out this year’s most recent highlights from the MIT Libraries’ collection of LGBTQIA+ works! All of the items listed are available at MIT Libraries or via Borrow Direct.

Fiction

Tiger’s Daughter | K. Arsenault Rivera

Afterparty | Daryl Gregory

A Line in the Dark | Malinda Lo

The Wanderers | Meg Howrey

Crossroads of Canopy | Thoraiya Dyer

Giovanni’s Room | James Baldwin

The Object of My Affection | Stephen McCauley

After Delores | Sarah Schulman

The Black Tides of Heaven | Jy Yang

Queer Praxis | Dustin Bradley Goltz

Sodom Road Exit | Amber Dawn

Poetry

Take Me With You | Andrea Gibson

IRL | Tommy Pico

Nonfiction

Surpassing Certainty | Janet Mock

Black Dove: Mamá, Mi’jo, and Me | Ana Castillo

Zami, A New Spelling of My Name | Audre Lorde

Ezili’s mirrors :imagining Black queer genders | Omise’eke Natasha Tinsley

Critically sovereign :indigenous gender, sexuality, and feminist studies | Joanne Barker, editor

Tomorrow will be different : love, loss, and the fight for trans equality | Sarah McBride

Graphic Novel

Queer: A Graphic History | Meg John Barker + Julia Scheele

My Solo Exchange Diary | Nagata Kabi

Pregnant butch : nine long months spent in drag | A.K. Summers

Body music | Julie Maroh ; translation of David Homel

Reality Bytes: Utilizing VR and AR in the Library Space

Terms like “virtual reality” and “augmented reality” have existed for a long time. In recent years, thanks to products like Google Cardboard and games like Pokemon Go, an increasing number of people have gained firsthand experience with these once-exotic technologies. The MIT Libraries are no exception to this trend. The Program on Information Science has conducted enough experimentation that we would like to share what we have learned and solicit ideas for further investigation.

This discussion will present participants with a firsthand opportunity to not only to hear about the ongoing learning in the VR and AR space in the MIT Libraries, but to also witness some of these technologies in action – both for viewing and creating relevant content. A variety of data will be shared and collected during the discussion.

Matt Bernhardt is a web developer at the MIT Libraries with a wide-ranging interest in technology – including digital fabrication and data visualization. A graduate of the Knowlton School of Architecture at Ohio State, he has been interested in how physical spaces and shapes can be represented digitally since the days of Zork and Snow Crash.

Event Details
Location: E25-401
We will provide lunch, please bring your own drink and your questions.

Information Science Brown Bag talks, hosted by the Program on Information Science, consist of regular discussions and brainstorming sessions on all aspects of information science and uses of information science and technology to assess and solve institutional, social, and research problems. These are informal talks. Discussions are often inspired by real-world problems being faced by the lead discussant.  

 

 

SolarSPELL: The Solar Powered Educational Learning Library

Laura HosmanAccess to high-quality, relevant information is absolutely foundational for a quality education. Yet, so many schools across the developing world lack fundamental resources, like textbooks, libraries, electricity and Internet connectivity. The SolarSPELL (Solar Powered Educational Learning Library) is designed specifically to address these infrastructural challenges, by bringing relevant, digital educational content to offline, off-grid locations. This talk will examine the design, development, and deployment of this for-the-field technology that looks simple but has a quite complex background.

SolarSPELL is a portable, ruggedized, solar-powered digital library that broadcasts a webpage with open-access educational content over an offline WiFi hotspot, content that is curated for a particular audience in a specified locality — in this case, for schoolchildren and teachers in remote locations. It is a hands-on, iteratively developed project that has involved undergraduate students in all facets and at every stage of development.

Laura Hosman
Hosman is assistant professor at Arizona State University, holding a joint appointment in the School for the Future of Innovation in Society and in The Polytechnic School. Her work is action-oriented and focuses on the role for information and communications technology (ICT) in developing countries. Presently, she focuses on ICT-in-education projects, and brings her passion for experiential learning to the classroom by leading real-world-focused, project-based courses that have seen student-built technology deployed in schools in Haiti, Vanuatu, Micronesia, Samoa, and Tonga.

Event Details
Location: E25-202
We will provide lunch; please bring your own drink and your questions.

Information Science Brown Bag talks, hosted by the Program on Information Science, consists of regular discussions and brainstorming sessions on all aspects of information science and uses of information science and technology to assess and solve institutional, social and research problems. These are informal talks. Discussions are often inspired by real-world problems being faced by the lead discussant.  

2016 Election Debrief Panel

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UPDATE: A recording of this event is available to view online on Facebook

Come join us for an election debrief panel that will include experts from the MIT faculty in the US political process, civic engagement, voting rights, economic inequality, technology policy, racial attitudes, and international student issues.

This event will create a space for MIT students and community members to ask questions about and discuss procedural aspects of US politics, how this election may shape the future for the US, the world, and MIT—and what students can do.

The discussion will be moderated by Professor Ed Bertschinger, the Institute Community and Equity Officer. The panel will include:

  • Ceasar McDowell, Professor of the Practice of Community Development
  • Amy Glasmeier, Professor of Economic Geography and Regional Planning
  • Ariel White, Assistant Professor of Political Science
  • Ken Oye, Associate Professor of Political Science and Engineering Systems
  • David Elwell, Associate Dean and Director, International Students Office

 

Event Details:

Kirsch Auditorium 32-123
All community members welcome.
Refreshments will be provided.

This event is sponsored by the Graduate Student Council, Undergrad Association, and MIT Libraries.

International Tangier: Exhibit in Rotch Library

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An exhibit at Rotch Library features never-before-exhibited photographs of the early 20thcentury International Zone of Tangier, Morocco. For centuries European powers battled one another and Moroccan forces for control of the city of Tangier, due to its strategic location on the Straits of Gibraltar, the point where the Mediterranean Sea meets the Atlantic Ocean. In 1924 an agreement made the city a demilitarized “International Zone” administered by a group of officials from other countries, yet still nominally under Moroccan sovereignty. With the exception of a period of five-year occupation by the Spanish during World War II, some variation of this arrangement remained in place until the city was returned to Moroccan sovereignty in 1956.

An exhibition at Rotch Library, curated by Michael A. Toler, PhD, highlights this period with prints made from the glass negatives collection of the Tangier American Legation Institute for Moroccan Studies (TALIM) in Morocco. The photographs date from roughly 1900 to 1930, a period during which the city of Tangier underwent a transformation that has been unrivaled until the growth of recent decades. Not only is Tangier now seeing a radical transformation due to new construction and infrastructure improvements, but there is also a growing emphasis on historic preservation of the built environment. The exhibition juxtaposes the older black and white images against more recent photographs appearing on the image labels.

The exhibition is hosted by the Aga Khan Documentation Center at MIT (AKDC@MIT) and organized in collaboration with the Program in Middle Eastern Studies of Wellesley College. It highlights a collaboration between AKDC, Wellesley’s Middle Eastern Studies Program, and Wellesley’s Office of Career Education to assist TALIM in the preservation of TALIM’s glass negatives collection. In the summers between 2013 and 2016, interns from Wellesley College went to Tangier and scanned all 2,000 negatives in TALIM’s collection, creating high resolution surrogates so the originals could be placed in cold storage. A catalog of the collection has been made available on Archnet.

AKDC@MIT and Wellesley College’s Middle Eastern Studies Program will host a joint reception for “International Tangier” on November 17 at 7:30pm.

An online version of the exhibitions will appear on Archnet soon after the reception.

Issues in curating the open web at scale

Photo of Gary Price

Gary Price

Much of the web remains invisible: resources are undescribed, unindexed or simply buried — as many people rarely look past the first page of Google searches or are unavailable from traditional library resources. At the same time, many traditional library databases pay little attention to quality content from credible sources accessible on the open web.

How do we build collections of quality open-web resources (i.e. documents, specialty databases, and multimedia) and make them accessible to individuals and user groups when and where they need it? This talk reflects on the emerging tools for systematic programmatic curation; the legal challenges to open-web curation; long-term access issues, and the historical challenges to building sustainable communities of curation.

Event details
Location: E25-401
Lunch will be provided

About Gary Price
Price received a Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Kansas, and a master’s in library and information science from Wayne State University. He was for a time a reference librarian at George Washington University. Price co-authored the book The Invisible Web (see Deep Web) with Chris Sherman in July 2001. Price has worked as a librarian at George Washington University and by the search engine Ask.com as Director of Online Information Resources. He also does frequent consulting projects and has written for a number of publications. Currently, he is a contributing editor at Search Engine Land. Before launching INFOdocket.com and FullTextReports.com in February 2011, Gary Price and Shirl Kennedy worked together for 10 years as founders and co-editors of ResourceShelf and DocuTicker. Price won the Special Libraries Association‘s “Innovations in Technology Award” in 2002, and their News Division‘s “Agnes Henebry Roll of Honor Award” in 2004. He was also awarded the Alumni of the Year Award from Wayne State’s Library and Information Program.

Information Science Brown Bag talks, hosted by the Program on Information Science, consist of regular discussions and brainstorming sessions on all aspects of information science and uses of information science and technology to assess and solve institutional, social and research problems. These are informal talks. Discussions are often inspired by real-world problems being faced by the lead discussant.  

Confidential Information: Storage, Sharing & Publication

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This class focuses on the tools and good practices for storing confidential data, sharing data for collaboration, and publishing data or derivative results for broad use.  Topics covered in this class include: an overview of information security standards and frameworks; information security core practices (credentials, authentication, authorization, and auditing); information partitioning and secure linking; file, disk, and network encryption tools and practices; cloud storage practices for confidential information; data “de-identification” tools and practices; statistical disclosure limitation approaches and tools; and data use agreements.

Event Details
Location: E25-401
Register
The course will be presented in a half-day format. Individual consultations may be scheduled with Micah Altman by contacting Kelly Hopkins at khopkins@mit.edu.

Discussant Bio: Micah Altman, PhD, is Director of Research and Head/Scientist, Program on Information Science for the MIT Libraries, at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Altman is also a Non-Resident Senior Fellow at The Brookings Institution. Prior to arriving at MIT, Altman served at Harvard University for 15 years as the Associate Director of the Harvard-MIT Data Center, Archival Director of the Henry A. Murray Archive, and Senior Research Scientist in the Institute for Quantitative Social Sciences.

Altman conducts work primarily in the fields of social science, information privacy, information science and research methods, and statistical computation—focusing on the intersections of information, technology, privacy, and politics; and on the dissemination, preservation, reliability and governance of scientific knowledge.

Can Computers be Feminist? Procedural Politics and Computational Creativity

Gillian SmithJoin the Program on Information Science for a brown bag talk, Can Computers be Feminist? Procedural Politics and Computational Creativity. Discussant Gillian Smith will examine how computers are increasingly taking on the role of a creator — making content for games, participating on Twitter, and generating paintings and sculptures. These computationally creative systems embody formal models of both the product they are creating and the process they follow. Like that of their human counterparts, the work of algorithmic artists is open to criticism and interpretation, but such analysis requires a framework for discussing the politics embedded in procedural systems. In this talk, we will examine the politics that are (typically implicitly) represented in computational models for creativity, and discuss the possibility for incorporating feminist perspectives into their underlying algorithmic design.

Gillian Smith is an Assistant Professor in Art+Design and Computer Science at Northeastern University, where she performs research and teaches in the game design program. Her research interests are in computational creativity, computational craft, and gender in games and technology.

Event details
Location: E25-401
Lunch is provided. Please bring your own beverage.
More information

Information Science Brown Bag talks, hosted by the Program on Information Science, consists of regular discussions and brainstorming sessions on all aspects of information science and uses of information science and technology to assess and solve institutional, social and research problems. These are informal talks. Discussions are often inspired by real-world problems being faced by the lead discussant.  

It’s Leap Year Day!

Common knowledgcredo's article leap yeare says we enjoy this extra day every four years, but is that really the frequency of February 29? Two online resources from the MIT Libraries answer this question and highlight the breadth of information they offer the MIT community.

Credo, a vast array of online encyclopedias, offers quick background on the subject of Leap Year. Besides confirming only century years divisible by four “leap,” you can also learn the term is first written in “English medieval encyclopedia On the Properties of Things (1398), translated by John Trevisa from the 12th-century Latin original by Bartholomew the Englishman.”[i]

MathSciNet, a major international math database, provides more leap year math. To quote:

“N is called a leap year if ∑∞k=1(−1)k+1(a1a2⋯ak|N)=1, where (xy)=1 if x divides y and 0 otherwise.”[ii]

Leap into this day and the MIT Libraries!

 

[i] Leap year. (2004). In Word histories and mysteries. Boston, MA: Houghton Mifflin. Retrieved from http://search.credoreference.com/content/entry/hmwhm/leap_year/0

[ii] http://www.ams.org/mathscinet-getitem?mr=1300279