Tag Archives: DSpace@MIT

Open access downloads: March 2019

March 2019 OA infographicThe Open Access Collection of DSpace@MIT includes scholarly articles by MIT-affiliated authors made available through open access policies at MIT or publisher agreements.

Each month we highlight the month’s download numbers and a few of the most-downloaded articles in the collection, and we feature stats and comments from a particular country.

See your own download statistics or those of a particular MIT department, lab, or center, or find more reader comments and global statistics.

Top downloaded articles for March:

Are You Your Friends’ Friend? Poor Perception of Friendship Ties Limits the Ability to Promote Behavioral Change, Abdullah Almaatouq, Laura Radaelli, Alex Pentland, Erez Shmueli

The Power of Optimization Over Randomization in Designing Experiments Involving Small Samples, Dimitris Bertsimas, Mac Johnson, Nathan Kallus

A Vacuum-driven Origami “Magic-ball” Soft Gripper, Shuguang Li, John J. Stampfli, Helen J. Xu, Elian Malkin, Evelin Villegas Diaz, Daniela Rus, Robert J. Wood

Questions or comments? Email us: oastats@mit.edu

Happy anniversary, MIT faculty open access policy

10 years OAOn March 18, 2009, MIT faculty unanimously approved a university-wide open access policy, the first of its kind in the country. The policy gave faculty rights to share their scholarly papers openly with the world—rights that until then were largely in the hands of journal publishers.

It was a monumental shift: Authors now legally held onto copyright in their work even if they later signed that copyright over to a publisher.* It meant they could post articles online, reuse them in talks, pluck out figures or images to incorporate into new works, and allow others to do the same and more, as long as the uses were non-commercial.

“In the quest for higher profits, publishers have lost sight of the values of the academy. Through this action, MIT faculty have shown great leadership in the promotion of free and open scholarly communication,” said Ann Wolpert, then director of the MIT Libraries, in 2009. Wolpert had worked for months with Hal Abelson, Class of 1922 Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, and others to move the resolution forward.

OA Policies and Practices Today

On the 10-year anniversary of the faculty vote, open access policies have proliferated: More than five dozen institutions in North America now have similar ones. MIT’s, too, has expanded: In 2017, MIT adopted an “opt-in” version of the policy that anyone on campus—postdoc, graduate student, undergrad, researcher, staff member—can sign to hold onto their rights.

There is also now a growing movement of scholars and academic institutions working to regain control of the products of their research in other ways—by, for example, flipping commercially owned, closed journals to open access ones run by researchers or non-profit publishers; exploring “next-generation repositories” that include peer review and other services and are managed by the scholarly community; and developing open-access friendly principles to use during negotiations with scholarly publishers and vendors.

Next Steps for MIT

In an effort to remain a leader in the open access movement, in 2017 MIT Provost Martin Schmidt convened an Ad Hoc Task Force on Open Access to MIT’s Research, which has over the last 18 months explored ways to update and revise MIT’s OA policies.

Today, 10 years after MIT faculty asserted their commitment to widely disseminating their work, the task force released a set of draft recommendations. They include ratifying an Institute-wide set of principles for open science; adopting an OA policy for monographs; and asking department heads to develop discipline-specific plans to encourage and support open sharing from their faculty, students, and staff.

The recommendations are open for public comment until April 17. Ideas can be submitted via the task force idea bank, on the open publishing platform PubPubvia email to the task force, or at an upcoming community forum on April 10, 3–4:30 p.m., in 56-114.

 

*That is, unless the publisher required a waiver, which several do. Authors can request a waiver on a paper-by-paper basis.

Open access downloads: February 2019

Feb 2019 OA infographicThe Open Access Collection of DSpace@MIT includes scholarly articles by MIT-affiliated authors made available through open access policies at MIT or publisher agreements.

Each month we highlight the month’s download numbers and a few of the most-downloaded articles in the collection, and we feature stats and comments from a particular country.

See your own download statistics or those of a particular MIT department, lab, or center, or find more reader comments and global statistics.

Top downloaded articles for February:

Physical and Mechanical Properties of PLA, and Their Functions in Widespread Applications — A Comprehensive Review, Shady Farah, Daniel G. Anderson, Robert Langer

Women Empowerment and Economic Development, Esther Duflo

Frequency-Domain Analysis of Super-Regenerative Amplifiers, J.L. Bohorquez, A.P. Chandrakasan, J.L. Dawson

Questions or comments? Email us: oastats@mit.edu

Open access downloads: January 2019

Jan 2019 OA infographicThe Open Access Collection of DSpace@MIT includes scholarly articles by MIT-affiliated authors made available through open access policies at MIT or publisher agreements.

Each month we highlight the month’s download numbers and a few of the most-downloaded articles in the collection, and we feature stats and comments from a particular country.

See your own download statistics or those of a particular MIT department, lab, or center, or find more reader comments and global statistics.

Top downloaded articles for January:

Optimization-based locomotion planning, estimation, and control design for the atlas humanoid robot, Scott Kuindersma, Robin Deits, Maurice Fallon, Andrés Valenzuela, Hongkai Dai, Frank Permenter, Twan Koolen, Pat Marion, Russ Tedrake

Consumer credit-risk models via machine-learning algorithms, Amir E. Khandani, Adlar J. Kim, Andrew W. Lo

Environmental Detection of Clandestine Nuclear Weapon Programs, R. Scott Kemp

Questions or comments? Email us: oastats@mit.edu

Celebrate Public Domain Day with the MIT Libraries

MIT Bulletin 1923

Cover of Military Science and Tactics by MIT, published 1923. Public domain via MIT Libraries.

January 1, 2019, is the first time in 20 years that works published in the U.S. have entered the public domain. Works in the public domain are free for anyone to read and use, and are a vital resource for creators to build from. Did you know that public domain images on Wikipedia, if they were not in the public domain, would cost $246 to $270 million dollars per year? Or that It’s a Wonderful Life became a holiday classic only after entering the public domain accidentally?

Despite the broad value of the public domain, however, copyright durations are extremely long, and have only been getting longer (copyright in works created today last throughout the creator’s life and for 70 years afterward). The most recent extension, the Sonny Bono Copyright Term Extension Act, took effect in 1998 and extended copyright durations for 20 years, freezing the public domain in the process. This year the copyright clock keeps ticking, and works from 1923 are entering the public domain for the first time.

MIT Libraries are celebrating the public domain by digitizing 100 newly public domain books from our collections. Come see the collection and follow our exploration of it on our Public Domain Day website. Wonder what the College Entrance Examination Board algebra requirements, Modern Radio Practice, or possibly Recent Opinions on Modern Vivisection were in 1923? Now you can find out! Throughout the month of January, we will be posting explorations of these books and the public domain itself. Celebrate the public domain with us!

This post is part of the MIT Libraries Public Domain Day celebration. Read the full text of public domain books digitized by the MIT Libraries, explore other volumes, and learn about the public domain at our website. This post is by Katie Zimmerman, Scholarly Communications and Licensing Librarian.

Open access downloads: December 2018

Dec 2018 OA infographicThe Open Access Collection of DSpace@MIT includes scholarly articles by MIT-affiliated authors made available through open access policies at MIT or publisher agreements.

Each month we highlight the month’s download numbers and a few of the most-downloaded articles in the collection, and we feature stats and comments from a particular country.

See your own download statistics or those of a particular MIT department, lab, or center, or find more reader comments and global statistics.

Top downloaded articles for December:

Physical and Mechanical Properties of PLA, and Their Functions in Widespread Applications — A Comprehensive Review, Shady Farah, Daniel Anderson, Robert Langer

Environmental Detection of Clandestine Nuclear Weapon Programs, R. Scott Kemp

Plastic Deformation of Semicrystalline Polyethylene Under Extension, Compression, and Shear Using Molecular Dynamics Simulation, Jun Mo Kim, Rebecca Locker, Gregory C. Rutledge

Questions or comments? Email us: oastats@mit.edu

 

Open access downloads: November 2018

Nov 2018 OA infographicThe Open Access Collection of DSpace@MIT includes scholarly articles by MIT-affiliated authors made available through open access policies at MIT or publisher agreements.

Each month we highlight the month’s download numbers and a few of the most-downloaded articles in the collection, and we feature stats and comments from a particular country.

See your own download statistics or those of a particular MIT department, lab, or center, or find more reader comments and global statistics.

Top downloaded articles for November:

Waiting to Vote, Charles Stewart, Stephen Ansolabehere

Optimization-based locomotion planning, estimation, and control design for the atlas humanoid robot, Scott Kuindersma, Robin Deits, Maurice Fallon, Andrés Valenzuela, Hongkai Dai, Frank Permenter, Twan Koolen, Pat Marion, Russ Tedrake

Space Propulsion Technology for Small Spacecraft, David Krejci, Paulo Lozano

Questions or comments? Email us: oastats@mit.edu

Open access downloads: October 2018

Oct 2018 OA infographicThe Open Access Collection of DSpace@MIT includes scholarly articles by MIT-affiliated authors made available through open access policies at MIT or publisher agreements.

Each month we highlight the month’s download numbers and a few of the most-downloaded articles in the collection, and we feature stats and comments from a particular country.

See your own download statistics or those of a particular MIT department, lab, or center, or find more reader comments and global statistics.

Top downloaded articles for October:

Physical and Mechanical Properties of PLA, and Their Functions in Widespread Applications — A Comprehensive Review, Shady Farah, Daniel G. Anderson, Robert Langer

Winter Heating or Clean Air? Unintended Impacts of China’s Huai River Policy, Douglas Almond, Yuyu Chen, Michael Greenstone, Hongbin Li

Design, Fabrication and Control of Soft Robots, Daniela Rus, Michael T. Tolley

Questions or comments? Email us: oastats@mit.edu

Open Access Week 2018

openaccess-orange-locksOpen Access Week is October 22-28!

To celebrate, we’re giving away prizes to members of the MIT community who sign the opt-in open access license during OA week. Stop by the Libraries’s table in Lobby 10 on Monday, October 22, to learn more.

The opt-in open access license expands MIT’s faculty open access policy to include students, postdocs, researchers, and staff — anyone on campus who wants to hold onto rights to share and reuse their scholarly papers. If that’s you, opt-in now to retain rights to your scholarship, broaden your audience, and help expand access to science. Check out this video about the license.

More goings-on: