Music

Digital stewardship residents announced

Posted June 26th, 2014 by Heather Denny

LogoColorTextBelowThe National Digital Stewardship Residency Program of Boston (NDSR-Boston) has announced their first cohort of residents. MIT Libraries along with four other local institutions, will host the early-career residents who will focus on digital preservation projects at their institutions.

Tricia Patterson was chosen as MIT Libraries’ resident. She will begin her residency in September working on an important project to preserve MIT’s digital audio content. The “Making Music Last” project will involve preserving treasured audio documentation of music at MIT.

Patterson is a recent MSLIS graduate from Simmons College. She began her archival career at the Texas State Library and Archives Commission before moving to Boston. While at Simmons, she focused on digital preservation, digitizing textual collections at the John F. Kennedy presidential archive, and working as an editorial assistant and program facilitator for Simmons. She has worked at several other Boston-area institutions including Harvard University and the Boston Athenæum.

“It is very exciting for MIT Libraries to be an organizer of the National Digital Stewardship Residency (NDSR) Boston program and a host institution for its first cohort. Tricia Patterson is a wonderful fit for our project,” said Nancy McGovern, MIT Libraries’ Head of Curation and Preservation Services.

For more information about the projects and residents, visit the NDSR Boston website.

 

Discovering the Libraries: Top 10 things to know

Posted June 5th, 2014 by Pritee Tembhekar

By MIT Libraries’ student blogger, Pri Tembhekar

Hello everyone!

It is with bittersweet sentiment that I write my last blog for the MIT Libraries. This post will be about the top 10 things to know about the Libraries. I’ve covered some of these tips in other posts, so this entry will be a good way to tie it all together.

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Bonus tip:The courtyard outside Hayden Library is a relaxing place to study.

  1. Library hideaways can make studying just a little better. The Libraries have many beautiful places to study and also contain 24-hour study rooms. Check out my post about the Lewis Music Library.
  2. Stop by the Libraries for textbooks. You don’t have to carry them around in order to study between classes. The Libraries have textbooks on reserve that you can check out for two hour increments. There are also some textbooks available online through the Libraries. It could save you significant money!
  3. Think outside your courses for fun options at the Libraries. The Libraries have resources well outside science and technology. The Libraries have videos and travel books. Check out my spring break post for more ideas.
  4. On a similar note, the Libraries can help you pursue your interests. The Lewis Library has concerts and open mics that could help nurture and preserve your interest in music. If art is more your style, the Libraries’ pass to the MFA allows you to take non-MIT friends along for free.
  5. Student jobs at the MIT Libraries are a fantastic way to make money and learn. There are many ways to get involved. From the student workers I interviewed, I really got the sense that working at the Libraries had become more than just a job. In my short time here I have learned a lot about blogging and felt a community among the Libraries’ staff. Check out my student jobs post.
  6. The libraries can make research less painful! For in-depth, longer-term research making an appointment with a librarian can go a long way. Subject matter experts can really push you in the right direction. See my post on research resources for more information.
  7. Research guides provide a quicker fix and concise information. They can be accessed online and cover a wide range of subjects. More information is available in the research resources post.
  8. One of the lesser known Libraries’ resources are the range of special events they host. During their IAPril series of events, I learned about using Mendeley software to manage PDFs and citations. There were also events on 3-D printing and business resources. Some events can be really surprising. For example, preservation week brought a letter locking event to MIT.
  9. Meet at least one librarian or staff member during your time at MIT. When I met Jana Dambrogio, I was amazed by her passion for letter locking, something I had never heard of. Not only are they incredible resources, but the Libraries’ staff have unique interests that are refreshing for someone immersed in science and technology.
  10. The Libraries’ scanners are fantastic. They create high quality images with no hassle. When I asked a few senior friends what they liked best, this was the most surprising answer.

I hope you’ve enjoyed reading my blog as much as I’ve enjoyed writing it! There’s an excellent video on this topic made by the Libraries and featuring students. Best of luck readers!

Discovering the Libraries: Student jobs

Posted May 1st, 2014 by Pritee Tembhekar

By MIT Libraries’ student blogger, Pri Tembhekar

Hello everyone!

I’ve spent quite a few posts now describing resources offered by the Libraries. This week is about a resource that jumps off the page all by itself: money. The Libraries offer a range of paid positions for student workers, including jobs during the summer and IAP. Full information can be found at the student jobs page.

Jobs come in three major flavors. The first and most visible is circulation. These students may have helped you get books you reserved or check out materials. They also work to open and close the library and re-shelve books. Other responsibilities include answering questions, checking the shelves to make sure the materials are correctly placed and accessible, and retrieving materials from the stacks. The second is clerical. Fairly self-explanatory, this position includes ordering materials, stamping books, managing spreadsheets, sorting materials, and special projects like managing digital collections. Finally, students can also do storage and project work. The specifics of this job often depend on what is needed in the Libraries. That might be looking for books, applying barcodes, moving materials into storage, and helping with circulation and clerical duties. To get started you’ll need to identify the job you want, have at least some sense of your schedule, apply online, and  fill out an I-9. One of the major advantages of these jobs, in addition to being paid, is the opportunity to work in a peaceful, beautiful space surrounded by books. To get an insider’s perspective, I interviewed Rebecca Navarro and Kaylee Brent on their experiences.

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Rebecca working at the Lewis Music Library.

Name: Rebecca Navarro

Year: 2014

Course: 16

Job and tenure: Circulation at Lewis Music Library, four years

Hours per week: I’m one of the crazy ones so I work between 12 and 20 hours each week. But it’s easy to get more or fewer hours.

Highlights of the job: I like the relaxed environment. I love the staff. They are really knowledgeable. Working at the music library has also given me an opportunity to continue to pursue music. My concentration is music and I’m really interested in it. The composer forums, open mics,  live concerts, and other cool events bring music to me. I get to learn more about music and keep that passion alive.

Reasons for working at the Libraries:  Honestly as a freshman it was because I needed a job for the money. I live in senior house so I actually know the music library exists. Reasons for continuing were that I love the staff that I work for. They are really accommodating. During finals week they allow for more downtime so that I can study but they also give me assignments when I’m bored.

Learnings on the job: I have learned how to use Barton, how to research properly at the library. I have also learned how accessible the staff is, even for obscure questions.

Take-away message: Don’t be afraid to ask for something you need. I see so many people struggling to find something that they could have found in a few minutes with my help, or the help of the staff.

 

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Kaylee in the Dewey Library staff room.

Name: Kaylee Brent

Year: 2016

Course: 12

Job and tenure: Circulation at Dewey Library, two years

Hours per week: About 10 hours a week.

Highlights of the job: I like that it is pretty easy work and that it is fairly flexible. I get to listen to music when I’m in the stacks. When I’m working at desk I can do some homework during downtime. I’ve also found out about some great resources.

Reasons for working at the Libraries:  I needed money. I’ve worked a bunch of different jobs at MIT. This is low stress and reasonable. I have gotten to the point where generally people see me as competent. They are comfortable with giving me more control of the library. I don’t have to ask questions all the time.

Learnings on the job: I have learned how useful course reserves are! I haven’t bought a textbook in a while because I can use them for free in the libraries.

Take-away message: You should act in the first week of term to maximize opportunity for jobs. It varies by library what your responsibilities are.

Last open mic this semester – Friday, May 2

Posted April 23rd, 2014 by Christie Moore

pianoJoin us for the final open mic this semester in the Lewis Music Library, one last chance to try out the new piano. Come jam, perform, or just listen. Everyone welcome. Bring your own music or use the library’s (we’ve got lots!).

Date: Friday, May 2, 2014
Place: Lewis Music Library, Bldg. 14E-109
Time: noon- 1 pm
Refreshments provided

Composer Florian Hollerweger: Thursday, May 1

Posted April 23rd, 2014 by Christie Moore

Composer forum series: Florian Hollerweger

revolution_florianThe Revolution is Hear! Sound Art, the Everyday, and Aural Awareness.

Date: Thursday, May 1, 2014
Place: Lewis Music Library, Bldg. 14E-109
Time: 5-6 pm
Reception follows
Free and open to the public

Sponsored by MIT Music and Theater Arts.

Electroacoustics for lunch – Monday, April 28

Posted April 17th, 2014 by Christie Moore

electroacoustic-flyer_medJoin us for a lunchtime performance by MIT’s Florian Hollerweger (Music and Theater Arts) and Forrest Larson (Lewis Music Library) as they explore acoustic and electronic sounds of ethereal and earthbound origins in a new collaboration.

Date: Monday, April 28, 2014
Place: Lewis Music Library, Bldg. 14E-109
Time: noon – 1 pm
Reception follows
Free and open to the public

Help identify MIT Banjo Club of ca.1893

Posted April 10th, 2014 by Christie Moore

Is one of these players your ancestor? Help identify members of MIT’s Banjo Club of ca.1893, the picture hanging outside the Lewis Music Library!

BanjoClub_1893webFrom yearbooks in the Institute Archives and Special Collections, we have made some tentative IDs. Left to right, standing: Nathan Cheney ’94; possibly Floyd Frazier ’96; Winthrop Tracy Case ’94; possibly Edwin Francis Hicks ’94; possibly F.S.V. Sias ’95. Sitting: possibly Lucius Spaulding Tyler ’96; Albert William Thompson ’95 or ’96; George Frederic Shepard, Jr., ’95.

Post a comment on the Lewis Music Library Facebook page if you can help!

 

Violin music concert Friday, 4/11/14

Posted April 1st, 2014 by Christie Moore

sjia_achow_cropThe 12th annual Prokopoff violin music concert will be held on Friday, April 11, from 1-2 pm in the Lewis Music Library. Nine talented MIT students will perform music by Rachmaninoff, Chopin, Wieniawski, Bach, Paganini, and Elgar. Come enjoy some wonderful music in an attractive setting!

This event highlights the more than 2,000 violin music scores collected by Stephen Prokopoff and donated to the library in 2001 by Lois Craig, former Associate Dean of MIT’s School of Architecture and Planning.

Date: Friday, April 11, 2014
Place: Lewis Music Library, Bldg. 14E-109
Time: 1 – 2 pm

The concert is free and open to the public.

Discovering the Libraries: Lewis Music Library

Posted March 26th, 2014 by Pritee Tembhekar

By MIT Libraries’ student blogger, Pri Tembhekar

Hello everyone!

MusicLibSm

Some great study spaces in the Lewis Music Library.

This week’s post is about one of my favorite places to study–the Lewis Music Library. It is especially valuable for classical music aficionados but has resources for all to enjoy. I often visit the music library when I’m craving a quieter place to work but one that is not as oppressive or pungent as, say, the reading room in the student center. The upstairs study nook is good for more casual work. The large tables downstairs provide ample room to spread out your papers and get to business. Upstairs, there are two group study rooms that are ideal for team meetings. The group study rooms can also be used by one person, but they must relocate should a group need the space.

The music library also offers much more beyond a quiet, calm, and naturally lit study space. All that studying can cause considerable stress. From first-hand experience I know that playing music can relieve stress and encourage a happier perspective. If you’ve been meaning to get back to a musical instrument that you once loved, Lewis Library’s scores can help. With over 39,000 musical scores, there’s certainly something you can pick up to ease back into playing music. There are also pieces from 1880-1920 in the Inventions of Note collection that can be accessed online.

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There are pianos on the 1st and 2nd floor as well as Macintosh computers with music software on both floors.

Once you are back into the swing of music, you might consider joining other musicians for an open mic afternoon. Full reign of the piano and a captive audience are up for grabs about once a month in the Lewis Music Library. The next open mic event is Friday April 4th from 12-1 pm in the music library. A full list of music library events, including professional performances, can be found here.

The music library also offers other handy resources to keep in mind. There is a scanner/copier and Macintosh computers on the second floor. These computers have music software that allows for editing and composition. This includes Sibelius7, Finale 2012, Reaper 4, and Logic Pro X. Listening devices for VHS, DVD, and CDs are also available and can be used in the group rooms to facilitate music study. Finally, the library specializes in in-depth research. There are starter guides available, as well as interesting finds such as the oral history collection, and online streaming.

 

Next open mic in the Lewis Music Library: April 4

Posted March 20th, 2014 by Christie Moore
piano

Piano obtained through the Class of 1982 Music Library Fund

It’s happening again: Library music! Open mic in the Lewis Music Library, a chance to try out the new piano. Come jam, perform, or just listen. Everyone welcome. Bring your own music or use the library’s (we’ve got lots!).

Date: Friday, April 4, 2014
Place: Lewis Music Library, Bldg. 14E-109
Time: noon- 1 pm
Refreshments provided

Save the date! One more first Friday open mic event this semester: May 2, 2014

Composer Keeril Makan – Thursday, April 3

Posted March 10th, 2014 by Christie Moore

Composer forum series: Keeril Makan

keeril_smLetting Time Circle Through Us and other recent music
A preview for the concert of Keeril Makan’s music by Either/Or on April 5 in Killian Hall.

Date: Thursday, April 3, 2014
Place: Lewis Music Library, Bldg. 14E-109
Time: 5-6 pm
Reception follows
Free and open to the public

Sponsored by MIT Music and Theater Arts.

Next open mic in the Lewis Music Library – March 7

Posted February 21st, 2014 by Christie Moore
piano

Piano obtained through the Class of 1982 Music Library Fund

Back by popular demand: Library music! Open mic in the Lewis Music Library, a chance to try out the new piano. Come jam, perform, or just listen. Everyone welcome. Bring your own music or use the library’s (we’ve got lots!).

Date: Friday, March 7, 2014
Place: Lewis Music Library, Bldg. 14E-109
Time: noon- 1 pm
Refreshments provided

Save the dates! Upcoming open mic events: first Fridays, April 4 and May 2, 2014

Open-score intro to the Beethoven quartets – March 6

Posted February 21st, 2014 by Christie Moore

jupiter_quartet_smOpen-Score Introduction to the Beethoven Quartets: The Jupiter Quartet,  hosted by Teresa Neff. Quartet in G Major, Op. 18, No. 2; Quartet in E-flat Major, Op. 74 “Harp”; Quartet in E minor, Op. 59, No. 2. The Jupiter Quartet will present each of the works on their concert program of March 7 and play excerpts, with scores and facsimiles available for use by the audience.

Date: Thursday, March 6, 2014
Place: Lewis Music Library, Bldg. 14E-109
Time: 6:30 pm
Q and A and reception follows
Free and open to the public

Sponsored by MIT Music and Theater Arts.

Paper engineering page turns for music scores – March 3rd

Posted February 14th, 2014 by Christie Moore

Paper Engineering Page Turns for  Music Scores

paper_eng_1_tnCome spend an hour with composer and vocalist Erin Gee and MIT Libraries Conservator Jana Dambrogio as they demonstrate a practical and low-tech way to transform the pages of your performing music scores into a continuous sheet of paper that is easy to handle during performances.

Erin will perform the voice part from her piece for voice and ensemble, Mouthpiece X, to show how the enhanced score functions. Jana will demonstrate how you can do this with your own music.

Date: Monday, March 3, 2014
Place: Lewis Music Library, Bldg. 14E-109
Time: 5-6 pm
Reception follows
Free and open to the public

Composer Charles Shadle – Wednesday, March 5

Posted February 14th, 2014 by Christie Moore

Composer forum series: Charles Shadle

CharlesShadle_tn Western Saddlebag: Cowboy Songs and the Craft of Composition.
Charles Shadle, MIT Senior Lecturer in Music and Theater Arts.
The talk will focus on Western Saddlebag, a newly composed suite of arrangements of traditional cowboy melodies for piano.

Date: Wednesday, March 5, 2014
Place: Lewis Music Library, Bldg. 14E-109
Time: 5-6 pm
Reception follows
Free and open to the public

Sponsored by MIT Music and Theater Arts.

New and improved services you’ll <3

Posted January 30th, 2014 by Heather Denny

Heart made from book pagesWelcome back! While you were on winter break, the Libraries were working on some improvements we think you’ll like (possibly even love).

  • Extended borrowing periods Yes, you can keep books out longer! You asked, and we doubled the amount of time you can borrow library materials. 60 days for most MIT items, with up to 5 renewals.

If you like these services, let us know! Connect with us on Twitter or Facebook.

Composer Forum presents Either/Or – Thursday, Feb.13

Posted January 29th, 2014 by Christie Moore

The Composer Forum series presents Either/Or:

either_or_sm

Contemporary music ensemble Either/Or will perform in the Lewis Music Library:

Date: Thursday, February 13, 2014
Place: Lewis Music Library, Bldg. 14E-109
Time: 5-6 pm
Reception to follow
Free and open to the public

The performance will feature selections of music by Alvin Lucier to be performed in concert at the MIT Chapel on 2/15/14. Sponsored by MIT Music and Theater Arts.

Thanks, MIT music, for your dulcet tones.

Posted January 17th, 2014 by Jana Dambrogio

This week was an all-things-MIT-Music for the conservation lab. We de-installed the “Noteworthy Connections” exhibition in the Maihaugen Gallery  featuring the music treasures from the Lewis Music Library and the Institute Archives and Special Collections.

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MIT’s Chorallaries, an a cappella music group, provides cheerful music to listen to while we make protective enclosures for some of the illuminated music manuscripts folios that will be used for teaching next semester. We are curious to discover more “whistle-while-you-work” music created by MIT faculty, staff, and students.

Open mic in the Lewis Music Library

Posted January 9th, 2014 by Christie Moore
piano

Piano obtained through the Class of 1982 Music Library Fund

Library music! Open mic in the Lewis Music Library, a chance to try out the new piano. Come jam, perform, or just listen. Everyone welcome. Bring your own music or use the library’s (we’ve got lots!).

Two dates: Friday, January 10, and Friday, January 24, 2014
Place: Lewis Music Library, Bldg. 14E-109
Time: noon- 1 pm

Refreshments provided

 

IAP 2014: Culture, Arts, and Society

Posted December 9th, 2013 by Mark Szarko

Join the MIT Libraries for a series of classes on topics that range from letterlocking to the music of the Arab Spring. Some classes require registration.Beaver

Creative Bookbinding 2014
Tue Jan 7, 10:00am-12:30pm, 14-0513
Wed Jan 8, 10:00am-12:30pm, 14-0513
Contact: Kate Beattie, knb@mit.edu

Rare Book Speed Dating
Fri Jan 10, 10:30am-11:00am, 14N-118
Fri Jan 10, 11:15am-11:45am, 14N-118
Contact: Audrey Pearson, pearsona@mit.edu

Library Music! Open Mic in the Lewis Music Library
Fri Jan 10, 12:00pm-1:00pm, 14E-109
Fri Jan 24, 12:00pm-1:00pm, 14E-109
Contact: Peter Munstedt, pmunsted@mit.edu

Using Images in Your Work: A Look at Fair Use, Open Licensing, Copyright, and Identifying and Citing Images
Fri Jan 10, 1:00pm-2:15pm, 14N-132
Contact: Ellen Duranceau, efinnie@mit.edu

A Conversation with Ta’Nehisi Coates about Reading, Writing, and Libraries
Mon Jan 13, 11:00am-12pm, 14E-304
Contact: Patsy Baudoin, patsy@mit.edu

Leave It to the Beavers: A Snapshot of Life at MIT in the 1950s
Fri Jan 24, 2:00pm-3:30pm, 14N-118
Contact: Camille Torres Hoven, cttorres@mit.edu

Historic Letterlocking: The Art and Security of Letterwriting
Tue Jan 28, 10:00am-3:00pm, 14-0513
Wed, Jan 29, 10:00am-3:00pm, 14-0513
Contact: Jana Dambrogio, jld@mit.edu

Rap, Rai, Rock, and Revolution: The Role of Music in the “Arab Spring”
Tue Jan 28, 3:00pm-5:00pm, 3-133
Contact: Michael Toler, mtoler@mit.edu

For a complete list of IAP classes offered by the Libraries, please see our Calendar of Events.