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About oaDOI

This link to an open access version of an article comes through oadoi.org, which indexes millions of articles and delivers open-access full-text versions over an open API. The MIT Libraries are excited to offer this new path to access scholarly content. oaDOI is a contribution to an open access infrastructure that, by taking readers to versions of articles that are not behind paywalls, supports MIT’s aim of democratizing access to information. 

If you have any questions or comments on this service, please send them to scholarlypub@mit.edu.

Women in Science and Engineering@MIT Archival Initiative

Women in Science and Engineering@MIT Archival Initiative

Sheila Widnall teaching

Sheila Widnall, Institute Professor and Professor of Aeronautics and Astronautics, courtesy of MIT Museum.

Thanks to the generous support of Barbara Ostrom, class of 1978, the MIT Libraries have launched a Women in Science and Engineering@MIT archival initiative.

Building upon the existing collections in the Institute Archives, the Libraries will acquire, preserve, and make accessible the unique personal archives documenting the careers of MIT’s female faculty in science and engineering.

We are excited to provide more resources and help to researchers of all disciplines who are seeking information about women in science and engineering at MIT. Stay tuned for more!

Lab notebook

Lab notebook from a professor’s personal archives. Institute Archives & Special Collections.

Experiments graduates

Wondering what happened with an experiment? This page lists previous experiments that successfully moved from beta to implementation.

Beta search

screenshot of a quick search

This quick search tool was developed in the MIT Libraries to make it easier to find books, movies, music, articles, journals, and the other valuable resources that the Libraries offer. Results are sorted into categories – books and media, articles and journals, and library website – to make it easier to scan and find a specific items.

Why this experiment?

The goals of this experiment were to:

  • make it easier to find known items,
  • provide a straightforward entry point for new library users,
  • and begin to own and improve on the discovery experience for the Libraries community.

Where can I find this tool now?

Use the “All” tab in the blue search area of the MIT Libraries homepage.

Experiment graduation: June 13, 2017

SNL Energy: Use restrictions

Please note:

Members of the MIT community may use SNL Energy data for scholarly, research, and educational purposes. For these purposes, limited, insubstantial portions of data may be excerpted and distributed to third parties, but in no event may you distribute data from this source in a quantity or in a manner that would serve as a substitute for purchase of this content. Any electronic distribution shall include a reasonably conspicuous notice as follows: “SOURCE: SNL FINANCIAL LC. CONTAINS COPYRIGHTED AND TRADE SECRET MATERIAL DISTRIBUTED UNDER LICENSE FROM SNL. FOR RECIPIENT’S INTERNAL USE ONLY,” or similar language.

MIT’s contract for this content specifies the following restrictions:

“Authorized users may not:

  1. Copy, reproduce, modify, distribute, publicly display, use or disclose the Licensed Materials in any manner not expressly authorized herein.
  2. Load the Licensed Materials as any networked configuration that permits or enables access to the Licensed Materials by third parties, whether via the Internet, a network or otherwise.
  3. Allow any third parties to access or view the Licensed Materials, except for authorized excerpting and distribution of limited portions as set forth above.
  4. Distribute any interfaces or software programs comprising the Licensed Materials.
  5. Download data from the Licensed Materials with the intent of using such data as a substitute for purchasing a subscription.
  6. Use the Licensed Materials, directly or indirectly, in competition with SNL.
  7. Use the Licensed Materials as a primary source to create and/or maintain any market indexes that it publishes or distributes to third parties.
  8. Create or maintain a database from or using the information or data from the Licensed Materials.
  9. Infringe or misappropriate the Licensed Materials, or take any action inconsistent with SNL’s ownership of and rights in the Licensed Materials.”

Additional restrictions also apply for certain included content:

  • For information from the CUSIP database: you may not “publish or distribute in any medium the CUSIP Database or any information contained therein or summaries or subsets thereof to any person or entity except in connection with the normal clearing and settlement of security transactions.”
  • For Fitch credit ratings: “Reproduction of the Fitch credit ratings in any form is prohibited except with the prior written permission of Fitch.”

Also note: SNL Energy is not intended for use by walk-in visitors of the library who are not affiliated with MIT.

Using the IIIF Mirador viewer

The Mirador viewer lets you view, zoom, and compare digital images – it is especially useful for examining archival materials like books and manuscripts that cannot be handled heavily, like the Class of 1982 Sequentiary.

By default, the viewer shows you one page at a time with a scrollable list of all the pages in the book below the current image, like this:


Mirador features

On the left and right are arrow buttons to page backward and forward through a multi-image object.

In the bottom right corner are options zooming in and out; panning up, down, right, left or returning the image to the initial view.

In the center above the scrollable list of pages is a toggle to hide and show it.

In the upper left is a menu for temporarily manipulating the current image (rotate, brightness, contrast, grayscale, invert). Also in the upper left is a menu for annotations – annotations are not currently enabled by default.

In upper left of the white toolbar across the top of the viewer, there is a menu for adding additional viewer slots to compare two (or more) images side-by-side. If there is more than one slot shown, there is a close button in the upper left for each slot. Also in the upper left toolbar is a button to show or hide the index panel.

In the upper right of the white toolbar across the top of the viewer, there are 3 options: a menu for changing displayed view, a button for viewing the object metadata, and a button for toggling full-screen. The view menu lets you change between a view of a single page, a book view which shows a two-image spread, a large scrollable list of all images, and a grid of thumbnails.

Want more? View the technical documentation for the Mirador viewer.

Class of 1982 Sequentiary (diva.js)

The Class of 1982 Sequentiary is a book from the 15th or early 16th century — donated to the MIT Lewis Music Library by the MIT Class of 1982 — that contains text and music of a genre of chants called “sequences.” The singing of sequences was largely removed from the Catholic Mass during the reforms of the Counter-Reformation, and thus intact sequentiaries are quite rare.


Sequentiary viewer


This project was created to support the Medieval and Renaissance Music class (21M.220) taught by Professor Michael Cuthbert. However, the digitization of the Class of 1982 Sequentiary allows students and researchers both at MIT and throughout the world to access and study the melodies, texts, notation, and presentation of this unique testimony owned by the Lewis Music Library at MIT.

Access to the physical item

The Class of 1982 Sequentiary is available at the Institute Archives and Special Collections (14N-118) at the MIT Libraries.
Learn more and request a visit

Technical details

This project uses the Diva.js viewer and IIIF.
How to use the Diva.js viewer

For technical support, or to report problems, please contact Carl Jones.

Manifest URL: https://libraries.mit.edu/app/iiif/sequentiary_demo_libweb1_ptif_manifest.json

Class of 1982 Sequentiary

The Class of 1982 Sequentiary is a book — donated to the MIT Lewis Music Library by the MIT Class of 1982 — from the 15th or early 16th century that contains text and music of a genre of chants called “sequences.” The singing of sequences was largely removed from the Catholic Mass during the reforms of the Counter-Reformation, and thus intact sequentiaries are quite rare.


View Class of 1982 Sequentiary in Mirador


This project was an experiment created to support the Medieval and Renaissance Music (21M.220) class taught by Professor Michael Cuthbert for Spring 2017. However, the digitization of the Class of 1982 Sequentiary allows students and researchers both at MIT and throughout the world to access and study the melodies, texts, notation, and presentation of this unique testimony owned by the Lewis Music Library at MIT.

Access to the physical item

The Class of 1982 Sequentiary is available at the Institute Archives and Special Collections (14N-118). The call number is FOLIO M2147 XV M1 however you must contact the archives to arrange to see the item. Learn more and request a visit

Technical details

This project uses the Mirador viewer and IIIF.
How to use the Mirador viewer

For technical support, or to report problems, please contact Carl Jones.

Manifest URL: https://libraries.mit.edu/app/iiif/class_of_1982_sequentiary.json

Experiments graveyard

Wondering what happened with an experiment? This page lists previous experiments that we decided to end and why.


Text Data Mining (TDM)/Fedora – MIT Theses

Fedora is an open source repository system especially suited for digital libraries and archives, both for access and preservation. It can provide specialized access to very large and complex digital collections of historic and cultural materials as well as scientific data. The MIT Libraries are experimenting with this platform to gain knowledge around text data mining (using the digitized MIT thesis collection in MIT’s DSpace) and Fedora4.

Why this experiment?

Text and data mining are important areas to understand in order to offer supporting services to our research community. Currently, this is not a standard feature within institutional repositories, which leaves publishers as the primary entities offering these services. While much was learned during this 4-month experiment that will speed future work in this area, there are existing technical challenges and a lack of demand so it is not a key priority for the Libraries to continue with at this time. If you are interested in seeing the API and other technical details, visit the project’s technical repository.

Experiment runtime: Fall 2016 – Fall 2017

Yewno

preview of Yewno
Yewno is a new type of discovery tool developed in Silicon Valley, which uses full text analysis and machine learning to create a visual, interactive map of connected concepts. The MIT Libraries participated in a beta project along with several other institutions, including Harvard, Stanford, Oxford, Stonehill College, Bavarian State University, the University of California-Berkeley, and the University of Michigan.

Why this experiment?

The goals of this experiment were to encourage experimentation and creative thinking in the discovery space, to evaluate the Yewno tool for possible inclusion in our discovery environment, and to serve as a template for future “beta” projects within the Libraries. After a 9 month beta period, we determined that while the Libraries are still interested and engaged in the tool that Yewno is developing, the timing to incorporate it into our discovery environment is not right. MIT Press will continue with Yewno Unearth; the Libraries will follow Yewno’s development and may include the tool in the future.

Experiment runtime: 2016

TryIIIF, an IIIF viewer and generator

preview of TryIIIF
The International Image Interoperability Framework (IIIF) aims to define a uniform method to access image-based resources, which are hosted at institutions around the world. IIIF wants  to develop shared technologies that allow scholars to view, compare, manipulate and annotate images. TryIIIF demonstrated two IIIF viewers and the JSON configuration file.

Why this experiment?

As a contributor to the IIIF open source effort, the MIT Libraries developed TryIIIF to demonstrate the power of IIIF, the viewer options, and the code needed to create an image view.

Experiment runtime: 2016

BrowZine

preview of BrowZine
BrowZine is a tool for reading e-journal issues on tablets, phones or on the web. It consolidates journals from several publishers, allowing you to read and browse issues through a single interface rather than looking up each journal individually.

Why this experiment?

The MIT Libraries tried BrowZine to explore ways to make online browsing more visually interesting and personalized. After a year-long trial, we decided not to renew our BrowZine subscription due to low adoption rate among our user community.

Experiment runtime: 2015 – 2016

Experiments at the MIT Libraries

Welcome to the Experiments program at the MIT Libraries. Experiments encourage risk-taking, rapid prototyping, and experimentation to support the innovative use of our data, collections, and services. We invite the MIT community to work along with us, submit their own hack, or suggest an experiment.

Below is the list of experiments that are currently in progress. It’s important to note that these are not intended to be fully supported tools or services, but instead opportunities to test, hack, provide feedback, iterate, and improve upon a concept.

As you explore the experiments, let us know how useful or interesting each is, and whether it should become a part of the supported tools and services the Libraries provide. Try them out and tell us what you think.

(Wondering what happened to a past experiment? Check out our graduates and graveyard.


Current Experiments

Class of 1982 Sequentiaryin Mirador using IIIF

preview of IIIF Sequentiary experiment
This experiment brings a rare archival object into the digital realm using the International Image Interoperability Framework (IIIF) and the Mirador viewer which allows viewers to access, zoom, pan, and study this delicate artifact from the 15th or early 16th century. The MIT Libraries is experimenting with providing greater access to rare materials in our collections to broaden scholarly inquiry beyond the library walls.

Why this experiment?

An opportunity to collaborate with Prof. Myke Cuthbert and the Lewis Music Library around the Medieval and Renaissance Music (21M.220) class came out of the acquisition of this unique but fragile object and the earlier TryIIIF experiment in 2016.

Experiment runtime: Spring 2017

Space experiment: “Unify the collection” in Hayden Library

The books in Hayden Library were once shelved on many various floors, which often made them difficult to locate. This experiment brings them together into a single, accessible flow in the basement, making the collection browsable without interruption.

Why this experiment?

Within this experiment, we hope to learn more about how the community browses and uses the collections, wayfinding, and what type of furniture/study space people most want or need near collections.

Experiment runtime: Spring – Summer 2017

Space experiment: Mezzanine flex spaces and study lofts in Hayden Library

The “Unify the collection” experiment allows us to remove shelving on the mezzanine levels of the first and second floor of the Hayden library. We can now use these spaces for other purposes: The first floor mezzanine will be developed as collaborative study/work space, and the second floor mezzanine will be a quiet study/work/reflection space.

Why this experiment?

With this experiment, we hope to learn more about the community’s work and study styles, preferences regarding types and arrangement of furniture, and general soundscaping. We’ll gather community feedback on these new spaces and explore further improvements. We’ll also explore options around privacy booths for phone/video calls, which has long been requested by the community.

Experiment runtime: Fall 2017 – Fall 2018

Reflecting Community through Art

This experiment aims to bring art depicting diverse communities into the Libraries to create a welcoming and inclusive space.

Why this experiment?

All the changes in Hayden have given us a chance to reconsider the art displayed throughout the library.

Experiment runtime: Fall 2017 – ongoing

Barker Active Learning Classroom

This new classroom space is built flexibly to allow for changes and iterations.

Why this experiment?

The new teaching and learning space will allow the Libraries’ instructional staff to develop teaching methods that our other spaces are not suited to accommodate.

Experiment runtime: Fall 2017 – Fall 2018

How to notify us about copyright concerns

The MIT Libraries are highly respectful of intellectual property rights and make every effort to ensure that we have appropriate rights to provide online access to our digital collections. Every effort is made to assess the copyright status of all materials and to ensure that the Libraries’ use is in full compliance with U.S. copyright law. In some instances, however, rights status may be difficult or impossible to determine.

If you are a rights holder and are concerned that you have found material available in MIT Libraries digital collections without your permission, and believe our inclusion of this material violates your rights (e.g. inclusion is not covered by Fair Use or another exemption to a copyright holder’s rights), please contact copyright-lib@mit.edu.

When contacting us, the more information you can supply, the more responsive we can be. It is particularly helpful if you include the following:

  • Your contact information (including email address, postal address, and phone),
  • Exact URL where you found the material,
  • Details that describe the material (title, collection name, number of items, etc.),
  • The reason why you believe that your rights have been violated, with any pertinent documentation,
  • A statement that you in good faith believe that use of the material in the manner complained of is not authorized by the copyright owner, its agent, or the law, and
  • A statement that the information in your notification is accurate and that you are the rights holder or are authorized to act on behalf of the owner.