Text-mining contract signed by Libraries offers computational access to Elsevier articles

Posted March 26th, 2014 by Ellen Duranceau

elsevier logoThe MIT Libraries have signed an agreement with Elsevier, the largest publisher of journal articles in the world, to allow members of the MIT community to text-mine scholarly articles subscribed to through Elsevier’s ScienceDirect service.

Typically, licensed access to journals like Elsevier’s does not permit systematic searching or downloading, and excludes the use of software agents, robots, or scripts. This has been a disappointment to many researchers, who wish to take advantage of automated tools to carry out new forms of research, speed up the research process, and enhance discovery and innovation.

Elsevier’s new service is a response to what they called “legitimate criticism” that publishers were not responding to researcher requests for text-mining. Chris Shillum, vice-president of product management for platform and content at Elsevier, told Nature Publishing that Elsevier had been considering requests “case by case,” but “now wants to make text-mining permissions quicker and easier to obtain,” by taking “’the practical barriers away.’”

The new text-mining service for Elsevier articles is available by contacting the Libraries’ Office of Scholarly Publishing, Copyright & Licensing through the address textmine@mit.edu.

When sending a request, please include your name, a short description of your proposed project (which could be simply to experiment with the service), and who else would be involved in this research. The Libraries will obtain an API key for you to use in carrying out your text-mining research. The researcher does not need to sign any agreement – the Libraries’ agreement removes that hurdle.

Use is limited to noncommercial research, with “snippets or bibliographic metadata” from the resulting dataset (that is, not the fulltext of articles) shareable through a Creative Commons Attribution Noncommercial license.

If you have any questions about this new service, please contact:

Ellen Finnie Duranceau / Program Manager, Scholarly Publishing, Copyright & Licensing / MIT Libraries

More information :

Discovering the Libraries: Lewis Music Library

Posted March 26th, 2014 by Pritee Tembhekar

By MIT Libraries’ student blogger, Pri Tembhekar

Hello everyone!

MusicLibSm

Some great study spaces in the Lewis Music Library.

This week’s post is about one of my favorite places to study–the Lewis Music Library. It is especially valuable for classical music aficionados but has resources for all to enjoy. I often visit the music library when I’m craving a quieter place to work but one that is not as oppressive or pungent as, say, the reading room in the student center. The upstairs study nook is good for more casual work. The large tables downstairs provide ample room to spread out your papers and get to business. Upstairs, there are two group study rooms that are ideal for team meetings. The group study rooms can also be used by one person, but they must relocate should a group need the space.

The music library also offers much more beyond a quiet, calm, and naturally lit study space. All that studying can cause considerable stress. From first-hand experience I know that playing music can relieve stress and encourage a happier perspective. If you’ve been meaning to get back to a musical instrument that you once loved, Lewis Library’s scores can help. With over 39,000 musical scores, there’s certainly something you can pick up to ease back into playing music. There are also pieces from 1880-1920 in the Inventions of Note collection that can be accessed online.

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There are pianos on the 1st and 2nd floor as well as Macintosh computers with music software on both floors.

Once you are back into the swing of music, you might consider joining other musicians for an open mic afternoon. Full reign of the piano and a captive audience are up for grabs about once a month in the Lewis Music Library. The next open mic event is Friday April 4th from 12-1 pm in the music library. A full list of music library events, including professional performances, can be found here.

The music library also offers other handy resources to keep in mind. There is a scanner/copier and Macintosh computers on the second floor. These computers have music software that allows for editing and composition. This includes Sibelius7, Finale 2012, Reaper 4, and Logic Pro X. Listening devices for VHS, DVD, and CDs are also available and can be used in the group rooms to facilitate music study. Finally, the library specializes in in-depth research. There are starter guides available, as well as interesting finds such as the oral history collection, and online streaming.

 

Improving Water Quality in 19th Century Massachusetts

Posted March 25th, 2014 by Nora Murphy

A recent MIT news spotlight on research for detecting bacteria brought to mind 19th century research on water quality in Massachusetts.

05.18.10.01_Ellen_edit_300In the 1880s MIT chemist Ellen Swallow Richards, in collaboration with faculty member Dr. Thomas Drown, undertook a multi-year, comprehensive survey of the Massachusetts water supplies for the State Board of Health. The results included definitive information about the flow of rivers, analysis of the chemicals in the water, and high and low water marks. The most significant outcome was the creation of a ‘normal chlorine’ map of the Commonwealth’s water supplies. The varying amounts of chlorine in the water samples taken from Massachusetts’ rivers revealed the extent of man-made pollution in the Commonwealth. The findings lead to the establishment in Massachusetts of the first water-quality standards in the U.S.

Ellen Swallow Richards was chemist to the Massachusetts Board of Health from 1872 to 1875 and water analyst from 1887 to 1897, and an advocate for sanitary water and safe cooking standards throughout her life.

To examine the papers of Ellen Swallow Richards, and to learn more about and MIT’s long history of research on sanitary chemistry and food technology, contact the MIT Institute Archives and Special Collections. Additional information about Mrs. Richards and her scientific contributions are available online.

Discovering the Libraries: Spring break at… the Libraries?

Posted March 21st, 2014 by Pritee Tembhekar

By MIT Libraries’ student blogger, Pri Tembhekar

It’s time for spring break! That may imply running away from stacks of books as fast as possible but consider a stop at the library first. The Libraries, particularly Hayden, has fantastic resources for fun times too.

If you’re staying in Cambridge/Boston:

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MIT Libraries MFA member card can be checked out.

Consider bringing a non-MIT friend with you to the Museum of Fine Arts (MFA). MIT students have free entry but Hayden Library also has passes to allow friends to get in for free. The MFA houses one of the most comprehensive art collections in the world. It offers a taste of almost every kind of fine art- including an ancient Egyptian wing and contemporary art. You can also make a day of it by visiting one of their in-museum restaurants.

If you’re feeling more like a homebody this spring break, you’re in luck. Hayden library offers a selection of movies and TV shows on DVD. For example, if you’d like a legal and convenient way to watch The Wire, consider heading to Hayden.

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Second floor of Hayden Library

I always intend to “read more” and “get cultured” to compensate for the deterioration of skills (other than p-setting) while at MIT. However sometimes I don’t know where to begin. The Browsery in Hayden solves this problem. There is an assortment of hand-picked books on display. You can sit on the couches nearby and decide which one you might like to read. If this puts you in the mood to relax and read lightly, you might head over to the rocking chair near the window and pick up a magazine on your way.

If you’re traveling:

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Hayden Library houses a range of travel guides.

I love to travel so the guidebooks section of Hayden always draws me in. It has books on a wide range of destinations, both domestic and international. Guidebooks can offer a well-rounded view of a destination, including what regions to book a fun and safe hotel, where to eat, and convenient maps to plan tours. For example, if you’re going to the Caribbean or other popular spring break destinations, Hayden has just the books for you.

If you’re me:

nullI’ll be going to Iceland. I stumbled across this educational gem, a book that hopefully will have no relevance to my spring break.

Happy spring break!

OA research in the news: New evidence for the ‘bang’ of the Big Bang

Posted March 20th, 2014 by Katharine Dunn
Alan Guth

Alan Guth

This week, a team of astronomers announced the first “smoking gun” evidence of inflation, a theory of cosmology that describes the quick and violent expansion of the universe in its first fractions of a second. Inflation is the “‘bang’ of the Big Bang,” says Alan Guth, an MIT physics professor who first proposed the theory in 1980. “In its original form, the Big Bang theory never was a theory of the bang. It said nothing about what banged, why it banged, or what happened before it banged.”

The astronomers peered into the cosmic microwave background, a bath of radiation from the early universe, and saw the influence of ripples in space-time, known as gravitational waves. These offer extremely strong evidence that the universe expanded by a repulsive form of gravity, as described by Guth and others.

Explore Professor Guth’s research in the Open Access Articles collection in DSpace@MIT, where it is openly accessible to the world.

Since the MIT faculty established their Open Access Policy in March 2009 they have made thousands of research papers freely available to the world via DSpace@MIT. To highlight that research, we’re offering a series of blog posts that link news stories about scholars’ work to their open access papers in DSpace.

Next open mic in the Lewis Music Library: April 4

Posted March 20th, 2014 by Christie Moore
piano

Piano obtained through the Class of 1982 Music Library Fund

It’s happening again: Library music! Open mic in the Lewis Music Library, a chance to try out the new piano. Come jam, perform, or just listen. Everyone welcome. Bring your own music or use the library’s (we’ve got lots!).

Date: Friday, April 4, 2014
Place: Lewis Music Library, Bldg. 14E-109
Time: noon- 1 pm
Refreshments provided

Save the date! One more first Friday open mic event this semester: May 2, 2014

Book returns to MIT, 56 years overdue

Posted March 20th, 2014 by Heather Denny

OverdueBookIt arrived at Hayden Library in a manila envelope with a handwritten note, “To whom it may concern: After my father died, we discovered the enclosed book among his possessions…” the note read. The enclosed book, Synthetic Ion-Exchangers, was last checked out in 1957. The date stamp in the back of the book indicated it was due on November 22, 1957, making it over 56 years overdue! It seems that while cleaning out his father’s things a son found the book and decided to return it to the MIT Libraries. The son stated that his father attended MIT in the late 1950′s and early 1960′s.

We can only speculate that Synthetic Ion-Exchangers enjoyed a nice long vacation in California (according to the postmark). Welcome back to MIT!

Learn About Socio-economic Data at the ACS Data Users Conference!

Posted March 20th, 2014 by Katherine McNeill

ACS logo

Use data from the American Community Survey (ACS), which measures social and economic trends in the U.S.?  Learn how to optimize your work by attending the inaugural ACS Data Users Conference!

Held May 29-30, 2014 in Washington, D.C., the program includes presentations by ACS data users, top Census Bureau staff, and a lunch presentation by John H. Thompson, director of the U.S. Census Bureau.

Space is limited, register now!

Can’t attend the conference but want to be part of the community?  Join the ACS Data Users Group.

Want to learn more about the ACS or other population data from the Census Bureau?  Check out the Libraries’ guide to Census and Demographic Data.

Check out the complete listing of IAPril 2014 sessions

Posted March 19th, 2014 by Mark Szarko

Pre-registration is required for some, but not all sessions. See below for details.

Class in the Digital Instruction Resource Center

photo by L.Barry Hetherington

Managing your references: Overview of EndNote, Mendeley, and Zotero – Register
Tue April 1, 12:00 – 1:00 pm, 14N-132
Contact: Remlee Green, remlee@mit.edu

Using citation management software to create and maintain a collection of references or PDFs is common and important in today’s academic world. These tools will help you to save citations from your favorite databases and websites, store related PDFs or attachments, and quickly build a bibliography for your papers and publications. We’ll compare and demo 3 tools (EndNote, Mendeley, & Zotero), so you’ll leave the session knowing which tool might work best for your needs.

Please register for this session.

3D Printing for Fun and Science? A Conversation about Digital Fabrication, the Library, and You – Register
Tue April 8, 11:00am – 12:30 pm, 3-442
Contact: Randi Shapiro, shapiror@mit.edu

Digital fabrication has changed considerably over the last few decades. Barriers to use have fallen, and technologies that were once the purview of specialized researchers are now sold in retail outlets like Sears, Staples and the Microsoft store. Schools and libraries have even begun getting into the act, from NC State to the Chicago Public Library.

Applications include producing prosthetic hands for accident victims, manufacturing replacement part for hard-to-source components, or even mapping word frequency across the history of a given journal and printing time series histograms.

But what about here at MIT?

This session will discuss the range of fabrication technologies now available, as well as those available at MIT, for sale, for rent, and (for a limited time, experimentally) through the Libraries. As part of this session, the Libraries have acquired a MakerBot Replicator 2 that is capable of producing objects in PLA plastic.

Plus, participants will have the opportunity to see a 3D-printer in action and even design their own objects – submit a printable file, generated by the free MakerWare software, by Tuesday, April 1st. Up to five submissions will be selected for production before the discussion (provided the designs are producible!).

(Hint: You can try turning a photo into a 3D model with 123D Catch.)

Presenter: Matt Bernhardt, Web Developer, MIT Libraries

Please register for this session.

Mendeley Basics – Register
Wed April 9, 12:00 – 1:00 pm, 14N-132
Contact: Peter Cohn,  pcohn@mit.edu

Mendeley is a free tool that can help you organize and manage your citations and PDFs. Learn how to use Mendeley to discover the latest research, collaborate with others, and automatically generate bibliographies.

Please register for this class.

Business Information for Engineers and Scientists – Register
Tue April 15, 1:00 – 2:00 pm, 14N-132
Contact: Howard Silver, hsilver@mit.edu

This session will introduce engineers and scientists to business information resources that will help you understand the commercial potential for your ideas, how to find partners, and sources for financial support. We will use realistic examples and hands-on exercises with key resources to demonstrate how to match your ideas and discoveries with the opportunities and realities of the marketplace.

Overview of Citation Analysis – Register
Tue April 15, 2:30 – 4:30 pm, 66-144
Time: 2:30-4:30 pm
Contact: Randi Shapiro, shapiror@mit.edu

Whose articles cite a body of work? Is this a high impact journal? How might others assess my scholarly impact? Citation analysis is one of the primary methods used to answer these questions.

Academics, publishers, and funders often study the patterns of citations in the academic literature in order to explore the relationships among researchers, topics, and publications, and to measure the impact of articles, journals, and individuals.

In this two-hour workshop, we will provide an overview of citation analysis, including: sources of data for citation analysis, common impact measures, and freely available software.

Attendees of the class will be eligible for an individual consultation session to explore individual projects and questions.

Presenter(s): Dr. Micah Altman, Director of Research, MIT Libraries; Sean Thomas, Program Manager for Scholarly Repository Services, MIT Libraries

Please register for this class.

Endnote Basics – Register
Wed April 16, 5:00 – 6:00 pm, 14N-132
Contact: Anita Perkins, perkins@mit.edu

EndNote is a “personal bibliographic software” package which allows you to create and manage a database of bibliographic references. Learn how to find and use information more effectively in our hands-on workshop.

Please register for this class.

NIH Public Access Compliance Hands-on Working Session - Register
Thu April 24, 1:00-2:00 pm, 14N-132
Contact: Courtney Crummett, crummett@mit.edu

Missing a PMCID? Can’t figure out why a paper isn’t in compliance? Lost in the NIH manuscript system? Join us for a problem solving session.

This session is designed to provide an opportunity for hands on problem solving in the systems that need to be navigated in the process of submitting and authorizing manuscripts and reporting progress on NIH Funded Grants (eRA Commons; NIHMS, and MyNCBI). Please bring your NIH compliance problems to this session to work through together. Registration encouraged.

Patent searching fundamentals
Thu April 24, 5:00 – 6:00 pm, 14N-132 – Register
Or
Fri April 25, 12:00 – 1:00 pm, 14N-132 – Register
Contact: Anita Perkins, perkins@mit.edu and Anne Graham, grahama@mit.edu

You won’t come out of this session qualified to be a patent attorney, but you will be able to successfully find patent references from all over the world, and know how to find patent text and diagrams. This will be a hands-on session that will help de-mystify the patent literature and show key resources for finding patents through free resources available on the web.

Going beyond Google Scholar: Using the Web of Science and Other Citation Searching Resources to Discover Articles
Mon April 28, 12:00 – 1:00 pm, 14N-132
Contact: Michael M Noga, mnoga@mit.edu

Do you usually look for articles by searching keywords and authors? Try tracking ideas back and forth through time by searching citations to and from articles, reports and other scholarly literature. Citation searching started with the Science Citation Index (Web of Science) and now is part of several other information sources such as Scopus, e-journal collections, and Google Scholar. We will look at several places where you can find scholarly literature through citations and the different results you can get.

Collect and Create Your Own Geographic Data – Register
Mon April 28, 2:00 – 4:00 pm, 14N-132
Contact: Jennie Murack, murack@mit.edu

Can’t find the data you need online? No problem! In this workshop we’ll learn how to collect data in the field using GPS units and phone apps and then use it in GIS software. We’ll also explore georeferencing scanned maps, drawing new data layers (like roads or rivers), and mapping points from a spreadsheet based on coordinates or addresses. Prerequisite: A basic knowledge of GIS and ArcGIS software

Five years on: University open access policies on the rise

Posted March 18th, 2014 by Katharine Dunn

uc_oap6bIn the five years (to the day!) since MIT faculty unanimously voted to pass the MIT Faculty Open Access Policy, dozens of other colleges and universities in North America have followed suit. In 2013 alone, nine institutions, or schools within institutions, committed to open access policies. These include Oregon State University, Wellesley College, the University of Rhode Island, Caltech, Bryn Mawr, and one of the largest public research universities in the world, the University of California. Faculty members at UC, which has 10 campuses and more than 8,000 faculty, receive about 8% of all research funding in the United States.

“Scholars everywhere owe deep thanks to the UC faculty,” wrote Peter Suber, director of the Harvard Office for Scholarly Communication, when the UC policy passed in July 2013. “[The policy] will increase the momentum for other universities to adopt their own OA policies. And it will prove that even the largest and most complex universities can still adopt OA policies by faculty vote.”

The recent policies all use language similar to MIT and Harvard, whose Faculty of Arts and Sciences passed the first OA policy in North America in 2008. They are permission based, which means faculty authors give their university a license to make articles freely available in an online repository like DSpace. In other words, OA policies like these shift the default to open access. As noted by the UC Office of the Academic Senate, “The adoption of this policy across the UC system also signals to scholarly publishers that open access, in terms defined by faculty and not by publishers, must be part of any future scholarly publishing system.”

More information:

OA policies at other universities

Guide on Good Practices for University Open-Access Policies

Discovering the Libraries: Meet the new student blogger!

Posted March 17th, 2014 by Pritee Tembhekar

Hello everyone!

Pri_masada_cropped_resize

Masada, Israel January 2014

My name is Pritee (Pri) and I’m the new Libraries student blogger. Through my posts I hope to share information about how the Libraries can be helpful to you. This will include everything from rare book collections, to online resources, to the Libraries’ best study spots. It took me far too long to realize how many resources MIT Libraries actually provides, and how relevant they are to me. Three and a half years in, there is still a lot left to be discovered. In my posts I’ll share tips on how to make studying and research a little bit more (gasp) enjoyable.

In case you are wondering who I am…

I’m a course 10 senior (chemical engineering) with a strong interest in energy. I UROPed in protein-based materials but eventually found out that research was not for me. After working at a refinery, I knew that global energy was the field for me. I’m a believer in the possibility of alternative energy to transform society. At the same time, the chemical engineer in me is fascinated with the complex problems of oil & gas and how they can be solved while that transformation occurs. Next year I’ll be taking my love for big problems and strategy to Houston and working in management consulting primarily for energy companies.

On campus, I’ve been involved in the Society of Women Engineers and Leadership Training Institute. I’m also a veteran of the Global Teaching Labs Program through which I’ve taught at high schools in Italy and Israel. I love to travel, visit farmers’ markets, and run along the Charles River.

Spring vacation hours begin Sunday, March 23

Posted March 17th, 2014 by Grace Mlady

dandelion-167112_1280The MIT Libraries spring vacation hours begin this Sunday, March 23 and run through Saturday, March 29. See below for a list of libraries and their spring vacation hours:

Barker, Dewey, Hayden (Humanities & Science), and Rotch:

  • Monday-Friday: 9am-6pm
  • Saturday-Sunday: 1pm-6pm

Lewis Music

  • Monday-Friday: 9am-5pm
  • Saturday-Sunday: closed

All libraries will resume regular hours on Sunday, March 30. For a list of individual library locations and hours, see our hours page.

Have questions? Ask Us!

New Exhibit: Thanks for the memory: 50+ years of computing at MIT

Posted March 12th, 2014 by Heather Denny
 Jay Forrester with Whirlwind staff and computer

Photograph of Jay Forrester with Whirlwind staff and computer, Barta Building, MIT campus

MIT’s wide-ranging impact on computer science is the focus of an exhibit that has just opened in the Libraries’ Maihaugen Gallery. From Project Whirlwind to Project Athena, MIT’s numerous contributions to the science of computing have affected society in ways no one could have imagined a century ago – though we take most of those developments for granted today.

Since World War II researchers at MIT have pushed computers to work faster, and more efficiently. They’ve explored applications for industry and government, and found ways to incorporate computers into research and teaching. This exhibit highlights some of the projects and research that have contributed to the development of computer theory, applications, software and hardware. The exhibit also celebrates the recent 50th anniversary of Project MAC – a project in which collaborative interdepartmental experimentation and research focused on time-sharing, human-computer interfaces, and interactive modeling.

The Maihaugen Gallery (14N-130) is open to the public Monday through Friday from 10:00 AM to 4:00 PM, except for Institute holidays and special events. The exhibit will run through July 2014.

OA research in the news: MIT, White House co-sponsor big data workshop

Posted March 12th, 2014 by Katharine Dunn

Last week, MIT hosted a daylong workshop on big data and privacy, co-sponsored by the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy as part of a government review of these issues and policies related to them. Several faculty from MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory spoke about their work. Among them was John Guttag, who described research done by one of his graduate students to develop an algorithm that uses hospital data to identify patients at risk for bacterial infection. Shafi Goldwasser and Nickolai Zeldovich both discussed schemes that would allow researchers to perform computations on encrypted data without decrypting it.

Explore Professor Guttag’s research, Professor Goldwasser’s research, and Professor Zeldovich’s research in the Open Access Articles collection in DSpace@MIT, where it is openly accessible to the world.

Since the MIT faculty established their Open Access Policy in March 2009 they have made thousands of research papers freely available to the world via DSpace@MIT. To highlight that research, we’re offering a series of blog posts that link news stories about scholars’ work to their open access papers in DSpace.

Composer Keeril Makan – Thursday, April 3

Posted March 10th, 2014 by Christie Moore

Composer forum series: Keeril Makan

keeril_smLetting Time Circle Through Us and other recent music
A preview for the concert of Keeril Makan’s music by Either/Or on April 5 in Killian Hall.

Date: Thursday, April 3, 2014
Place: Lewis Music Library, Bldg. 14E-109
Time: 5-6 pm
Reception follows
Free and open to the public

Sponsored by MIT Music and Theater Arts.

Access “that changes everything”: Readers reflect on value of MIT Faculty Open Access Articles

Posted March 10th, 2014 by Ellen Duranceau

oa reader comment benefit researcher
As we mark the fifth anniversary this month of the MIT Faculty Open Access Policy, readers from around the world have expressed their gratitude and appreciation for access to the articles made available through the Policy.

oa comments tax dollars quote

A reader who identified himself as an autodidact from India recently wrote that “We live in a time when bureaucracy is the impediment to knowledge, technology and equity more than ever before,” but that “This [access] changes everything.”

Similarly expansive appreciation was reflected by a corporate researcher in Malaysia: “With MIT free access, I can learn more and be a better human being.”

A full selection of reader comments is available on the MIT Libraries’ Scholarly Publishing website.

Ellen Finnie Duranceau / Program Manager, Scholarly Publishing, Copyright & Licensing / MIT Libraries

Worldwide access of MIT-authored articles reflects success of Faculty Open Access Policy

Posted March 7th, 2014 by Ellen Duranceau

As we mark the fifth anniversary of the MIT Faculty Open Access Policy, the benefits to readers worldwide grow more apparent with each passing month. Readers regularly download MIT authored articles from DSpace@MIT from all corners of the globe:

OA map Feb2014 med

Thirty-three percent of the access is from the United States, with heavy use from the research and population centers of China, India, the United Kingdom, Germany, Canada, Republic of Korea, Japan, and France, in that order. But downloads are requested from all over the world — Sweden, Brazil, Poland, Israel, and Malaysia each have accounted for about 1% of the total downloads, while the several hundred downloads from each of the African nations of Sudan, Ghana, and Uganda account for about .02%, .03%, and .04% of downloads, respectively. In 2013, downloads were requested from the Federated Republic of Micronesia and Burundi for the first time, and there have been four downloads from Greenland.

The message of these downloads is clear — five years from its inception, the faculty’s goal in adopting the MIT Faculty Open Access Policy, to “disseminat[e] the fruits of [their] research and scholarship as widely as possible,” is being met.

Ellen Finnie Duranceau / Program Manager, Scholarly Publishing, Copyright, and Licensing / MIT Libraries

Fifth anniversary of MIT Faculty Open Access Policy marks heavy use of articles

Posted March 5th, 2014 by Ellen Duranceau

Since the adoption of the MIT Faculty Open Access Policy in March 2009, over 11,000 articles have been made openly accessible through DSpace@MIT in relation to the Policy. These articles represent 37% of the total written by faculty during the same time period.

Downloads reached a new peak of 92,000 per month in October and have remained consistently above 80,000 since then, with the total cumulative downloads for all papers having surpassed 1.8 million in February.

oa articles dowload by month through feb 2014

Ellen Finnie Duranceau / Program Manager, Scholarly Publishing, Copyright, and Licensing / MIT Libraries

OA research in the news: A breakthrough in endometriosis research

Posted February 26th, 2014 by Katharine Dunn
Linda Griffith

Linda Griffith

Over the years Linda Griffith has undergone many surgeries for endometriosis, a condition in which tissue that normally grows in the uterus is found elsewhere in the body and can cause lesions, inflammation, and infertility. The disease is poorly understood, and so it made sense to Griffith, a professor of biological and mechanical engineering, to start researching it. In a paper published earlier this month, Griffith and colleagues, including bioengineering professor Douglas Lauffenburger, studied pelvic fluid from women with endometriosis and in about a third they found elevated levels of a group of immune system proteins. The work is an early step towards classifying the disease and, eventually, finding new treatments for it. “We’re not claiming we found a mechanism — the mechanism for endometriosis,” Griffith told the Boston Globe. “We have found a very convincing approach to understand an immune network.”

Explore Professor Griffith’s research in the Open Access Articles collection in DSpace@MIT, where it is openly accessible to the world.

Since the MIT faculty established their Open Access Policy in March 2009 they have made thousands of research papers freely available to the world via DSpace@MIT. To highlight that research, we’re offering a series of blog posts that link news stories about scholars’ work to their open access papers in DSpace.

Hayden Library’s new mobile device charging station

Posted February 24th, 2014 by Grace Mlady

ForHayden KwikBoost 3got your phone charging cable? Hayden Library now hosts a KwikBoost mobile device charging station which charges both cell phones and iPads. The device offers two Apple device cables and six phone charging cables.

Many thanks to IS&T who provided the Libraries with the station.

The station is located near the Hayden Library Information Desk. Come check it out!

Have questions? Ask Us!