OA research in the news: Report on the future of MIT education

Posted August 6th, 2014 by Katharine Dunn

This week, MIT President Rafael Reif released the final report of the Institute-wide Task Force on the Future of MIT Education, which “marks the beginning of an exciting new period of educational experimentation at MIT,” he wrote in a letter to the community.

Among other things, the report addresses MIT’s role in MOOCs, or massive open online courses, and suggests that MIT consider offering different levels of certification for students enrolled in classes through MITx and edX. It also recommends increasing the Institute’s undergraduate population or allowing students to complete their degrees in fewer than four years. The Task Force has been chaired by two faculty members: Karen Willcox, a professor of aeronautics and astronautics, and Sanjay Sarma, a professor of engineering who is also MIT’s director of digital learning.

Explore Professor Willcox’s research and Professor Sarma’s research in the Open Access Articles collection in DSpace@MIT, where it is openly accessible to the world.

Since the MIT faculty established their Open Access Policy in March 2009 they have made thousands of research papers freely available to the world via DSpace@MIT. To highlight that research, we’re offering a series of blog posts that link news stories about scholars’ work to their open access papers in DSpace.

Libraries participate in Summer Youth Employment Program

Posted July 30th, 2014 by Grace Mlady

Tinischa croppedThis summer, MIT has partnered with the city of Cambridge to participate in the Mayor’s Summer Youth Employment Program. The purpose of MSYEP is to provide high school students as well as some students in early college with the opportunity to work in a professional work environment and “expose youth to potential educational or career paths.” The Libraries, along with MIT’s Human Resources and Department of Facilities, have been selected as a work site within the community; each workplace is assigned a student where s/he works anywhere from 20-40 hours a week and meets regularly with a designated supervisor or mentor.

The Libraries have the pleasure of welcoming Tinischa Lahens as she joins Information Delivery and Library Access to help with a variety of circulation projects through August.

We had Tinischa answer some fun interview questions as a way to introduce her to Libraries’ staff and the rest of MIT. Without further ado, meet Tinischa!

Read the rest of this entry »

New Libraries homepage design will debut in August

Posted July 29th, 2014 by Heather Denny
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Tap image for a full view.

We’ve been hard at work redesigning our homepage, and it’s time to give you a sneak preview! By mid-August, you’ll see a new homepage for the MIT Libraries, and it will be stunning on smaller mobile screens, too.

Through focus groups, interviews, and usability testing, we’ve gathered your feedback about what you love (and don’t love) about the current homepage. Some recurring thoughts we heard include:

  • “Less is more!”
    Our most popular links are stashed in the navigation at the top of the new page.
  • “Search is important, but make it simpler.”
    The search box is still front and center, but we’ve streamlined it.
  • “Library hours need to be easier to find.”
    They’ll be right there on our homepage, in an easy-to-scan format that highlights which locations are open 24/7.
  • “Research Guides are super helpful, but I didn’t know about them.”
    Experts & Research Guides will display on the homepage, so you can easily find who or what you’re looking for.

We’re not quite done with the design phase, but the screenshot will give you a taste of what’s to come. Also stay tuned for more changes coming to our News page this fall.

If you have thoughts, concerns, or comments, we’d love to hear them. Tell us!

 

OA research in the news: Reader for the visually impaired

Posted July 23rd, 2014 by Katharine Dunn

ring_in_use_correctedResearchers in the Media Lab’s Fluid Interfaces Group have built a prototype of a device that helps visually impaired people read printed text. The FingerReader, developed by graduate student Roy Shilkrot and professor Pattie Maes, among others, sits like a ring on a user’s finger and scans words via a built-in camera as the user points to them. Software identifies the words and translates them into an audio track. The FingerReader also alerts users if their finger veers away from a line of text.

Though the FingerReader isn’t on the market, the researchers say they’re looking into this option. As Maes recently told the Associated Press, the FingerReader is “a lot more flexible, a lot more immediate than any solution that they have right now.”

Explore Professor Maes’s research in the Open Access Articles collection in DSpace@MIT, where it is openly accessible to the world.

Since the MIT faculty established their Open Access Policy in March 2009 they have made thousands of research papers freely available to the world via DSpace@MIT. To highlight that research, we’re offering a series of blog posts that link news stories about scholars’ work to their open access papers in DSpace.

OA research in the news: Robotics expert Seth Teller dies

Posted July 9th, 2014 by Katharine Dunn
Seth Teller

Seth Teller

Seth Teller, a professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS) and head of the Robotics, Vision, and Sensor Networks group, died last week at the age of 50. In a message to the EECS community, several of Teller’s colleagues wrote: “There can be no doubt of the magnitude of the loss we face on both a personal and professional level. Seth’s outstanding contributions as a researcher, teacher, mentor, and colleague set a standard that has inspired many of us. He was a generous, warm person whose passion for his work was contagious. He had a unique ability to envision new approaches to problems, then assemble, motivate, and guide large research teams to accomplish things far beyond what they thought possible.”

Teller worked in a wide range of fields, including robotics, vision, graphics, and human-computer interfaces. He recently led the MIT team that will compete in the finals of the DARPA Robotics Challenge, the goal of which is to develop robots that can help humans in disaster zones. He was also a leader of MIT’s Fifth Sense Project, whose researchers develop wearable devices to assist blind and low-vision people.

Explore Professor Teller’s research in the Open Access Articles collection in DSpace@MIT, where it is openly accessible to the world.

Since the MIT faculty established their Open Access Policy in March 2009 they have made thousands of research papers freely available to the world via DSpace@MIT. To highlight that research, we’re offering a series of blog posts that link news stories about scholars’ work to their open access papers in DSpace.

Barker Library reading room closed Wednesday, July 9th, 9am-noon

Posted July 8th, 2014 by Heather Denny

BarkerDomeVerticalThe Barker Library reading room will be closed temporarily on Wednesday, July 9th from 9am-12pm.

While the reading room is closed, library users can find alternative spaces for studying in the library on the upper floors, as well as in other library locations. Access to the Barker reading room is expected to resume by 12 noon.

We apologize for any inconvenience and thank you for your patience.

Doucette joins MIT Libraries to lead IT efforts

Posted July 1st, 2014 by Heather Denny
Doucette

Armand Doucette (photo by L. Barry Hetherington)

Armand Doucette has been appointed to the position of Associate Director for Information Technology and Digital Development at the MIT Libraries. In this position he will play an essential role in shaping the future of the Libraries’ digital environment–leading the Libraries’ technology strategy, and managing IT development in support of the Libraries’ initiatives and priorities.

Doucette comes to the Libraries from the MIT Sloan School where he was the Executive Director of Technology Services for 9 years. Among his many achievements at Sloan were the development of the MySloan intranet portal, the outfitting of the new Sloan building classrooms with robust technology in support of in-classroom and distance teaching and learning, and the development and growth of a professional and diverse staff. He also served on the Institute’s Information Technology Governance Council where he provided thoughtful input and advice on information technology issues.

“Armand is a proven manager and leader. At Sloan he provided oversight and direction to a diverse set of technology services including applications development, enterprise services, operations infrastructure, desktop and classroom support, and consulting and project management. These skills are well suited to help lead the MIT Libraries, and further develop the technology resources and services that MIT students, faculty and researchers require,” said Steve Gass, Interim Director of MIT Libraries. Doucette will begin his appointment July 1, 2014.

Libraries closed on July 4th

Posted July 1st, 2014 by Grace Mlady

All MIT libraries will be closed for Independence Day this Friday, July 4.flags-316407_640

The Libraries will resume summer weekend hours on Saturday, July 5. Please see our hours page for a detailed list of library locations and hours.

Have questions? Ask Us.

There’s a World of News at the Library!

Posted June 27th, 2014 by Heather McCann

pressdisplay

One of the ways MIT Libraries provides access to international news is the Library PressDisplay, where you can read your favorite international newspapers, sometimes even before the publications hit the newsstands.  Library PressDisplay is an online newspaper and magazine kiosk with full-format, full-color e-versions of more than 2,600 newspapers from 100 countries in 60 languages.  Among the titles are The Washington Post, The Guardian (United Kingdom), Le Figaro (France), Izvestia (Russia) and Der Tagesspiegel (Germany).   Advanced features allow you to translate or listen to articles, and search 30 to 60 days of back issues.

 

reader

The Press Reader app, available for Apple, Android, Blackberry or Windows, allows you to download full issues from Library PressDisplay on your mobile device to read on the go. You must be using authenticated MIT wi-fi for the app to recognize our subscription.

 

Check out our other news sources: http://libguides.mit.edu/news.

Study Sanctuary—Hayden’s Lipchitz Courtyard

Posted June 27th, 2014 by Heather Denny

The Lipchitz Courtyard within Building 14 (adjacent to Hayden Library) is a hidden gem—a quiet, leafy retreat where you can find a sunny or shady spot to pull up a chair and read a book, or enjoy artwork from MIT’s Public Art Collection.

The courtyard contains three sculptures by 20th century Cubist artist Jacques LipchitzPhotographer Yulla Lipchitz donated the monumental bronze sculptures by her late husband in memory of the late MIT President Jerome B. Wiesner, founder of the Council for the Arts at MIT. 

The garden is also featured on the list of MIT’s pocket gardens, It contains paper birch trees, azalea, hydrangea, rhododendron, and flowering perennials. Stop by to see what’s in bloom, and enjoy this special oasis!

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Digital stewardship residents announced

Posted June 26th, 2014 by Heather Denny

LogoColorTextBelowThe National Digital Stewardship Residency Program of Boston (NDSR-Boston) has announced their first cohort of residents. MIT Libraries along with four other local institutions, will host the early-career residents who will focus on digital preservation projects at their institutions.

Tricia Patterson was chosen as MIT Libraries’ resident. She will begin her residency in September working on an important project to preserve MIT’s digital audio content. The “Making Music Last” project will involve preserving treasured audio documentation of music at MIT.

Patterson is a recent MSLIS graduate from Simmons College. She began her archival career at the Texas State Library and Archives Commission before moving to Boston. While at Simmons, she focused on digital preservation, digitizing textual collections at the John F. Kennedy presidential archive, and working as an editorial assistant and program facilitator for Simmons. She has worked at several other Boston-area institutions including Harvard University and the Boston Athenæum.

“It is very exciting for MIT Libraries to be an organizer of the National Digital Stewardship Residency (NDSR) Boston program and a host institution for its first cohort. Tricia Patterson is a wonderful fit for our project,” said Nancy McGovern, MIT Libraries’ Head of Curation and Preservation Services.

For more information about the projects and residents, visit the NDSR Boston website.

 

Spam alert: Ignore emails asking for your username

Posted June 25th, 2014 by Heather Denny

Please be advised that some MIT students are receiving emails with the subject line “Reactivate your username.” The email says reactivation is required due to a new library system. These emails are spam and are not from the MIT Libraries.

The email asks you to complete registration before the beginning of the semester. Please ignore all emails asking for your information. If you’re unsure about a suspicious email, contact MIT’s IS&T Help Desk.

If you have any questions about how to use Your Account with MIT Libraries, please see our Circulation FAQ page.

OA research in the news: The cost of patent trolls

Posted June 25th, 2014 by Katharine Dunn
Catherine Tucker

Catherine Tucker

A new study by a Sloan researcher suggests that the recent increase of so-called “patent trolls”—companies that do little more than sue others over patent rights—has resulted in a huge loss of entrepreneurial activity in the United States. The study, by marketing professor Catherine Tucker, correlates patent litigation and venture capital (VC) investment using data from 1995 to 2012. The “evidence suggests that more lawsuits can distract management from developing new and innovative products, and may cause them to ignore products targeted by lawsuits, in addition to the more obvious litigation costs,” she writes. The paper says that VC investment would have been more than $21 billion higher over five years if not for lawsuits brought over patents by frequent litigators.

Explore Professor Tucker’s research in the Open Access Articles collection in DSpace@MIT, where it is openly accessible to the world.

Since the MIT faculty established their Open Access Policy in March 2009 they have made thousands of research papers freely available to the world via DSpace@MIT. To highlight that research, we’re offering a series of blog posts that link news stories about scholars’ work to their open access papers in DSpace.

Check out the complete listing of JulyAP 2014 sessions

Posted June 23rd, 2014 by Mark Szarko
photo by L.Barry Hetherington

photo by L.Barry Hetherington

Summer workshops in the Libraries are here! It’s like a little slice of IAP, only warmer.

Pre-registration is required for some, but not all sessions. See below for details.

Research Data Management: File Organization – Register
Thu July 10, 1:00 – 2:00 pm, 14N-132
Contact: Katherine McNeill, mcneillh@mit.edu

Do you struggle with organizing your research data? Wonder if there’s a better way to arrange and name your data files to optimize your work? This workshop will teach you practical techniques for organizing your data files. Topics will include: file and folder organizational structures and file naming.  Will include hands-on exercises to apply the concepts to your particular data project.

Introduction to GIS – Register
Mon July 14, 1:00 – 4:00 pm, 14N-132
Contact: Jennie Murack, murack@mit.edu

Learn the basics of visualizing and analyzing geographic information and creating your own maps in a Geographic Information System (GIS). We will introduce open source and proprietary GIS software options and let attendees choose to work through exercises using ESRI ArcGIS (proprietary) and/or Quantum GIS (QGIS) (open source). Learn to work with data from the MIT Geodata Repository, analyze the data, and create maps that can be used in reports and presentations.

GIS Level 2 – Register
Tue July 15, 1:00 – 4:00 pm, 14N-132
Contact: Jennie Murack, murack@mit.edu

Expand your experience with GIS software and learn how to create and edit GIS files, geocode addresses onto a map, re-project data, and use tools like Clip, Buffer, and Spatial Join. Prerequisite: Intro to GIS workshop or basic knowledge of ArcGIS

Getting Started, Getting Funded: Obtaining Research Funding – Register
Tue July 15, 1:00 – 5:00 pm, E17-139
Presenter: Dr. Micah Altman
Contact: Randi Shapiro, shapiror@mit.edu

Increasingly, conducting innovative research requires resources that exceed those readily on-hand to the individual scholar. You can use research funding to access a wider set of research methods, to accelerate your research project, expand its scope and depth, and increase its impact. This short course provides an overview of the types and sources of funding available for research support, and introduces the fundamental elements of planning, proposal writing, and management for “sponsored” projects. The course is geared toward junior faculty, postdocs, and graduate students (in late stages or on the job market), who are new to the funding process, are considering whether to seek funding from new sources, or who would like a systematic review of the grant writing and review process. The course will be presented in a half-day format, followed by an individualized consulting session focused on each attendee’s research project. Schedule individual consultations with Randi Shapiro at shapiror@mit.edu.

For more information, please consult the Program on Information Science Website.

Business Information for Engineers and Scientists – Register
Thu July 17, 4:00 – 5:00 pm, 14N-132
Contact: Howard Silver, hsilver@mit.edu

This session will introduce engineers and scientists to business information resources that will help you understand the commercial potential for your ideas, how to find partners, and sources for financial support. We will use realistic examples and hands-on exercises with key resources to demonstrate how to match your ideas and discoveries with the opportunities and realities of the marketplace.

Managing Your References: Overview of EndNote, Zotero, and Mendeley – Register
Mon July 21, 12:00 – 1:00 pm, 14N-132
Contact: Anita Perkins, perkins@mit.edu

Using citation management software to create and maintain a collection of references or PDFs is common and important in today’s academic world. These tools will help you to save citations from your favorite databases and websites, store related PDFs or attachments, and quickly build a bibliography for your papers and publications. We’ll compare and demo 3 tools (EndNote, Mendeley, & Zotero), so you’ll leave the session knowing which tool might work best for your needs.

Current and Emerging Uses for Wikipedia in Research – Register
Tue July 22, 1:00 – 2:00 pm, 14N-132
Contact: Stacey Snyder, ssnyder@mit.edu

“Well, actually…” you begin when the topic of Wikipedia’s accuracy comes up in conversation. If you’ve found yourself in this position, come share ways you have effectively used Wikipedia in your own research or in consultation with students and professors. Learn how to use complementary applications to guide you to valuable library resources. Join the discussion on the future of Wikipedia and the information landscape.

NIH Public Access Compliance Hands-on Working Session – Register
Thu July 24, 1:00 – 2:00 pm, 14N-132
Contact: Courtney Crummett, crummett@mit.edu

Missing a PMCID? Can’t figure out why a paper isn’t in compliance? Lost in NIH manuscript system? Join us for a problem solving session. This session is designed to provide an opportunity for hands on problem solving in the systems that need to be navigated in the process of submitting and authorizing manuscripts and reporting progress on NIH Funded Grants (eRA Commons; NIHMS, and MyNCBI). Please bring your NIH compliance problems and logins to this session to work through together. Registration encouraged.

Patent Searching Fundamentals – Register
Friday July 25, 1:00 – 2:00 pm, 14N-132
Contact: Anita Perkins, perkins@mit.edu

This session will enable you to successfully find patent references from all over the world, and obtain patent text and diagrams. This hands-on session will help de-mystify the patent literature and show key resources for finding patents.

ILLiad downtime Thursday, June 26th, 3-4pm

Posted June 23rd, 2014 by Melissa Feiden

ILLiad at MITPlease be aware that, due to a scheduled software upgrade, ILLiad will be unavailable from 3pm-4pm EST on Thursday, June 26, 2014.  During this outage, you will not be able to:

  • place new Interlibrary Borrowing requests
  • place requests for article delivery from the Library Storage Annex
  • download PDF copies of articles
  • track or change existing requests
  • renew Interlibrary Borrowing books
  • do anything that requires ILLiad

For more information, see our ILLiad system outage page.

Barker Library closing early on Thursday, June 12

Posted June 11th, 2014 by Jeremiah Graves

Barker Engineering LibraryThe Barker Library Reading Room will close at 3:30pm and the library as a whole will close at 5:00pm on Thursday, June 12 for a private function.

Access to the Barker 24/7 study space is expected to resume by 9:00pm and the library will be open for regular business hours on Friday.

All other MIT Libraries locations will remain open for regular business hours and the 24/7 study spaces in Dewey and Hayden will be available after closing.

We apologize for any inconvenience and thank you for your patience.

OA research in the news: Anand wins 2014 Drucker Medal

Posted June 11th, 2014 by Katharine Dunn
Lallit Anand

Lallit Anand

Mechanical engineering professor Lallit Anand has won the 2014 Daniel C. Drucker Medal, awarded by the Applied Mechanics Division of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. The medal is one of the highest distinctions a mechanician can achieve. Anand was cited for his “seminal contributions to the formulation of constitutive theories for the plastic response of a variety of engineering solids, including polycrystalline metals, metallic glasses, glassy polymers, and granular materials.”

Explore Professor Anand’s research in the Open Access Articles collection in DSpace@MIT, where it is openly accessible to the world.

Since the MIT faculty established their Open Access Policy in March 2009 they have made thousands of research papers freely available to the world via DSpace@MIT. To highlight that research, we’re offering a series of blog posts that link news stories about scholars’ work to their open access papers in DSpace

Make time to make more stuff!

Posted June 9th, 2014 by Chris Sherratt

tools2Knowing as we do that MIT people love to make things, last summer Mechanical Engineering Librarian Angie Locknar made a guide about designing & making stuff.

“We wanted to have one place to go to find things that people might need if they like to invent/create/build … plus we’re hoping users will send other helpful links to include.” Perhaps this is just what you need to kick start that still, but not for much longer, put-off project. Or you might want to finally master that cool new tool!

 

 

 

Discovering the Libraries: Top 10 things to know

Posted June 5th, 2014 by Pritee Tembhekar

By MIT Libraries’ student blogger, Pri Tembhekar

Hello everyone!

It is with bittersweet sentiment that I write my last blog for the MIT Libraries. This post will be about the top 10 things to know about the Libraries. I’ve covered some of these tips in other posts, so this entry will be a good way to tie it all together.

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Bonus tip:The courtyard outside Hayden Library is a relaxing place to study.

  1. Library hideaways can make studying just a little better. The Libraries have many beautiful places to study and also contain 24-hour study rooms. Check out my post about the Lewis Music Library.
  2. Stop by the Libraries for textbooks. You don’t have to carry them around in order to study between classes. The Libraries have textbooks on reserve that you can check out for two hour increments. There are also some textbooks available online through the Libraries. It could save you significant money!
  3. Think outside your courses for fun options at the Libraries. The Libraries have resources well outside science and technology. The Libraries have videos and travel books. Check out my spring break post for more ideas.
  4. On a similar note, the Libraries can help you pursue your interests. The Lewis Library has concerts and open mics that could help nurture and preserve your interest in music. If art is more your style, the Libraries’ pass to the MFA allows you to take non-MIT friends along for free.
  5. Student jobs at the MIT Libraries are a fantastic way to make money and learn. There are many ways to get involved. From the student workers I interviewed, I really got the sense that working at the Libraries had become more than just a job. In my short time here I have learned a lot about blogging and felt a community among the Libraries’ staff. Check out my student jobs post.
  6. The libraries can make research less painful! For in-depth, longer-term research making an appointment with a librarian can go a long way. Subject matter experts can really push you in the right direction. See my post on research resources for more information.
  7. Research guides provide a quicker fix and concise information. They can be accessed online and cover a wide range of subjects. More information is available in the research resources post.
  8. One of the lesser known Libraries’ resources are the range of special events they host. During their IAPril series of events, I learned about using Mendeley software to manage PDFs and citations. There were also events on 3-D printing and business resources. Some events can be really surprising. For example, preservation week brought a letter locking event to MIT.
  9. Meet at least one librarian or staff member during your time at MIT. When I met Jana Dambrogio, I was amazed by her passion for letter locking, something I had never heard of. Not only are they incredible resources, but the Libraries’ staff have unique interests that are refreshing for someone immersed in science and technology.
  10. The Libraries’ scanners are fantastic. They create high quality images with no hassle. When I asked a few senior friends what they liked best, this was the most surprising answer.

I hope you’ve enjoyed reading my blog as much as I’ve enjoyed writing it! There’s an excellent video on this topic made by the Libraries and featuring students. Best of luck readers!

Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum passes are back at the Hayden Library!

Posted June 4th, 2014 by Melissa Feiden

Isabella Stewart Gardner MuseumIsabella Stewart Gardner Museum passes are back at the MIT Libraries!  Discount passes for the Gardner Museum are available with an MIT ID at the Hayden Library.

There are some special things to know about these passes:

  • Check availability of passes in the Barton catalog before making a trip to Hayden to pick them up.
  • Each pass is good for one specific day: Monday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, Saturday or Sunday.
  • One pass for each of these days will admit 4 visitors for a discounted price of $5 each.

Don’t miss the Gardner’s current Special Exhibition: Carla Fernández: The Barefoot Designer: A Passion for Radical Design and Community

If you have any questions, please email circulation@mit.edu.  Enjoy your passes!