An evening with author Ken Liu

Meet the creator of MIT Reads' spring book selection

Event date April 12, 2017 7 - 9pm
Ken Liu

© Li Yibo (李一博)

Join us for a discussion with Ken Liu, author of The Paper Menagerie, a collection of fantastical fiction and this year’s final selection for the MIT Reads program.

Too busy to read the whole book right now? No problem! Ken plans to focus on two stories, “The Paper Menagerie” and “The Bookmaking Habits of Select Species.” Just read those and you’ll be all set — but we suspect that once you start you’ll want to read them all.

Event details
Program:
7pm reading/book talk/Q&A; 8pm book signing
Location: 2-190
Free, but registration is required.

If you require accommodations, please contact Nina Davis-Millis by April 5.

This event sponsored by the MIT Libraries, the Division of Student Life, and the School of Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences.

About the author
Ken Liu is an author and translator of speculative fiction, as well as a lawyer and programmer. A winner of the Nebula, Hugo, and World Fantasy awards, he has been published in The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction, Asimov’s, Analog, Clarkesworld, Lightspeed, and Strange Horizons, among other places.

Liu’s debut novel, The Grace of Kings (2015), is the first volume in a silkpunk epic fantasy series, The Dandelion Dynasty. It won the Locus Best First Novel Award and was a Nebula finalist. He subsequently published the second volume in the series, The Wall of Storms (2016) as well as a collection of short stories, The Paper Menagerie and Other Stories (2016).

In addition to his original fiction, Liu is also the translator of numerous literary and genre works from Chinese to English. His translation of The Three-Body Problem, by Liu Cixin, won the Hugo Award for Best Novel in 2015, the first translated novel ever to receive that honor.

He lives with his family near Boston, Massachusetts, and describes himself as “American, Chinese; Christian, Daoist, Confucian; populist, contrarian, skeptic, libertarian (small ‘l’); bridge-builder; a liminal provincial in America, the New Rome.”