Discovering the Libraries: Galleries, audio books, and 24-hour study

Posted May 15th, 2014 by Pritee Tembhekar

By MIT Libraries’ student blogger, Pri Tembhekar

Hello everyone!

This week’s post is about fun and eclectic features of the Libraries. These are useful for some intellectual relaxation or a quick break from studying in the library. As the Libraries’ blogger, I wanted to explore some aspects of the Libraries that are less well-known. This week, I dove into the galleries and audiobook collection. This post will be followed by one on preservation, the archives, and rare books.

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Maihaugen Gallery

With graduation just around the corner, many of us have friends and family visiting. These curious visitors often want to know more about the history and importance of MIT (especially when their darling child is getting a degree). The MIT Museum is a great resource, as are the Library exhibits. The largest library exhibit space is the Maihaugen Gallery. You have likely passed by this gallery on your way to Hayden Library or Walker Memorial. It is located in 14N-130. Established in 2008, the Maihuagen Gallery provides an up-close look at MIT’s rare books, artwork, maps, historical documents and photographs. Currently, the gallery is showcasing the evolution of computing at MIT. Friends and family members of all ages will likely enjoy seeing relics from a by-gone computing age and their connection to MIT.

To celebrate the end of the year, I’m taking a few road trips. Top 40 on the radio can get old fast, so this time I’m planning to bring along some audio books. The Libraries have a collection of audio books for all different tastes. For example, I’m interested in the impact of social media on human interactions so Professor Sherry Turkle’s book Alone Together stood out to me. One cautionary note is that the audiobooks are primarily in CD format. Thus if you have a fancy new car that only reads mp3s, this might not be the right option.

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Dewey Library 24×7 study space

Finally, I wanted to include a note about the 24-hour study spaces the Libraries provide. You’ll probably be studying this part of the semester and it can sometimes be hard to find a quiet space. During non-library hours these areas are accessible with your MIT ID. They do not provide access to library books, however there are plenty of tables, computers, and printers. Good luck with finals!

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