Archive for May, 2013

Get inspired to write your Nobel prize-winning thesis!

Posted May 31st, 2013 by Remlee Green

photo: MIT TechTV

Does graduation cause you to have dissertations on the brain? Get a load of these great thesis resources from MIT Libraries:

OA research in the news: Modern dance meets robotics

Posted May 30th, 2013 by Katharine Dunn

Umbrella Project performance premiere, fall 2012

Earlier this month, more than 250 members of the MIT community gathered on Jack Berry Field carrying specially made umbrellas that lit up with red, blue, and green LED lights via handheld controllers. They were there to perform UP: The Umbrella Project, a collaboration between CSAIL’s Distributed Robotics Lab and the dance company Pilobolus. Directed by a Pilobolus team member and shot by video from above, UP participants walked about, changing the hue of their umbrellas in a live performance piece. The purpose wasn’t solely artistic: CSAIL director Daniela Rus and fellow researchers will study the video to explore the behaviors of large groups. “While our work with robotics and Pilobolus’ work with modern dance may seem at first glance unrelated, we have found there is a wealth of knowledge to be gained at the intersection of art and science that offers deep insight into human behavior, findings that are incredibly useful to the field of computer science,” said Rus.

Explore Professor Rus’s research in the Open Access Articles collection in DSpace@MIT, where it is openly accessible to the world.

Since the MIT faculty established their Open Access Policy in March 2009 they have made thousands of research papers freely available to the world via DSpace@MIT. To highlight that research, we’re offering a series of blog posts that link news stories about scholars’ work to their open access papers in DSpace.

Summer hours begin Friday, May 24

Posted May 22nd, 2013 by Grace Mlady

The MIT Libraries’ summer hours begin this Friday, May 24, 2013.

Barker, Dewey, Hayden (Humanities & Science), and Rotch
Monday-Friday: 9am-6pm
Saturday-Sunday: 1pm-6pm

Lewis Music
Monday-Friday: 11am-5pm
Saturday-Sunday: closed

These hours will remain in effect through Tuesday, August 27, 2013.  For a complete list of library locations and hours, see our hours page.

Have questions? Ask Us!

Libraries closed for Memorial Day weekend

Posted May 20th, 2013 by Grace Mlady

All MIT Libraries will be closed for Memorial Day weekend, Saturday, May 25 through Monday, May 27, 2013. The 24/7 study spaces in Barker, Dewey, and Hayden are still accessible over the weekend.

The Libraries will resume summer hours on Tuesday, May 28.  Please see our summer hours for a list of library locations and hours.

Have questions? Ask Us!

Berinsky Awarded for Contributions to Public Opinion Data

Posted May 16th, 2013 by Katherine McNeill

Berinsky photo

Adam Berinsky, Professor of Political Science and director of the Political Experiments Research Lab (PERL), has won the Warren J. Mitofsky Award for Excellence in Public Opinion Research from the Roper Center for Public Opinion Research.  Berinsky shares the award with Eric Schickler of the University of California, Berkeley.

The award honors their project of rehabilitating hundreds of under-utilized opinion polls from the 1930s-1950s that were in an obsolete and cumbersome format.  At the project’s completion, nearly one thousand surveys will have been reformatted, labeled and re-deposited with the Roper Center for easier access by the research community.

Want to access this public opinion data yourself?  Use aggregate statistics or micro-level poll results?  Access the Libraries’ Roper Center membership at: http://libraries.mit.edu/get/roper  (note: you’ll need to set up an individual account on their site to download data).

The Roper Center for Public Opinion Research is a leading archive of social science data, specializing in public opinion. The data held by the Roper Center range from the 1930s, when survey research was in its infancy, to the present.

For more resources, see also:

OA research in the news: Can IP rights slow innovation?

Posted May 16th, 2013 by Katharine Dunn

Intellectual property rights may give incentive to people and companies to do creative work, but do they also hinder subsequent innovation? This is the question economics professor Heidi Williams asks in a new paper published in a recent issue of the Journal of Political Economy. Over a decade ago, the government-funded Human Genome Project and the private firm Celera each published work on human genome sequencing. From day one, the HGP put its sequenced genes in the public domain, while Celera relied on IP rights to protect its work, selling data to firms and requiring licenses for any commercial products developed.

Williams investigated how the 1,600 genes covered by Celera’s IP—which all eventually went into the public domain—fared compared with genes initially sequenced by the HGP. She found that Celera’s genes were less likely to be the focus of both scientific research and commercial development, even years after the Celera genes were freely available. “One additional year of Celera’s intellectual property translates to a persistent and permanent difference in whether we figure out whether it is linked to disease,” Williams told the Boston Globe. She suggests that IP rights reduced subsequent scientific research and product development by 20 to 30 percent.

Explore Professor Williams’ research in the Open Access Articles collection in DSpace@MIT, where it is openly accessible to the world.

Since the MIT faculty established their Open Access Policy in March 2009 they have made thousands of research papers freely available to the world via DSpace@MIT. To highlight that research, we’re offering a series of blog posts that link news stories about scholars’ work to their open access papers in DSpace.

Check out the Travel Collection

Posted May 10th, 2013 by Mark Szarko

Travelling sometime soon? Come to see the Travel Collection on the second floor of the Hayden Library right next to the comfy couch.Grand Canyon Hikers.

You will find these and several guides for countries, cities, regions, and types of travel throughout the world. Check out what you need, and if you don’t find it, remember that you can use the Suggested Purchase form to request a guide.

New milestone for Open Access @ MIT: one million downloads

Posted May 10th, 2013 by Ellen Duranceau

Four years after the MIT faculty adopted their Open Access Policy, a significant new milestone has been reached: Papers made openly available through the Open Access Articles Collection have been downloaded over 1 million times. Total downloads from the collection of just under 9,000 papers reached 1,045,518 by the end of April.

Another highwater mark was met in April as well: monthly downloads topped 65,000 for the first time, with a total of 67,319 downloads from around the world that month.

These downloads come from all around the world, reaching traditional as well as new audiences for MIT faculty publications.

More information about the MIT Faculty Open Access Policy:

FAQ about the Policy
Deposit a paper under the Policy
Readers of MIT Open Access Papers

Hayden Library finals week hours begin Thursday, May 16

Posted May 10th, 2013 by Grace Mlady

Hayden Library (Humanities and Science) will begin special finals week hours on Thursday, May 16, 2013. Hayden will remain open every day until 2am for members of the MIT community only, from the last day of classes up to the last day of the final exam period: Thursday, May 16 through Thursday, May 23.

All other libraries will continue Spring term hours. For a complete list of library hours, visit our library hours page.

And don’t forget — the 24-hour study facilities in Barker, Dewey, and Hayden libraries will remain open as usual throughout this period.

Have questions? Ask Us!

Archives’ Kari Smith blogs about digital archives

Posted May 9th, 2013 by Lois Beattie


 
Announcing the blog, Engineering the Future of the Past, by staff of the MIT Institute Archives and Special Collections.

Are you interested in knowing what the MIT Libraries is doing about digital archives?  Follow Digital Archivist Kari Smith as she writes about the processes and practice of dealing with digital records and archives.

 

ASME engineers a new interface

Posted May 9th, 2013 by Chris Sherratt

Looking for a paper from ASME?  (What IS ASME, you say?)

MIT Libraries has subscribed to The American Society of Mechanical Engineers digital library for several years. Now it has a new interface!

ASME Digital Collections is the place to search for full text articles in ASME journals (all years) or for conference papers from 2002 – present.

AND…if you need a conference paper prior to 2002?  The Barker Engineering Library has thousands of ASME technical papers in its collections. Use the ASME Papers & Publications guide to locate them.  Or just Ask Us!

Move over ACME….Beep Beep!

Take the MIT Libraries with you on summer break

Posted May 8th, 2013 by Remlee Green

suitcaseClasses are almost over, and summer is practically here. Keep these tips in mind for seamless library access all summer long:

  • Don’t dash off without renewing your books! You can use Your Account to renew, or find answers to your questions about renewing & returning.
  • Finals week study breaks! Take a study break, have a snack, and de-stress. Therapy dogs at Hayden!
  • Away from campus on a tropical island? Check out these tips for off-campus access before you go!
  • Want to make sure you don’t miss any cutting edge research during your travels? Subscribe to our RSS feeds of new books by topic.
  • And don’t forget, if you need our help from a faraway destination, you can always Ask Us!

New Streaming Media at MIT Libraries

Posted May 6th, 2013 by Mark Szarko

The Libraries is pleased to announce new offerings in streaming media that support our MIT communities.

Art and Architecture in Video
http://libraries.mit.edu/get/artv
This streaming video database offers more than 400 documentaries and interviews illustrating the history, theory, and practice of art, design, and architecture. This database includes real-time transcript highlighting, the ability to make clips, and offers links for embedding in course management systems.

OnArchitecture
http://libraries.mit.edu/get/onarch
This streaming video package contains more than 150 interviews with architects, project walk-throughs, and other original video about architectural design. Watch an interview with Ai Weiwei: http://www.onarchitecture.com/interviews/ai-weiwei-0. This resource offers closed captioning.

OntheBoards.tv
http://libraries.mit.edu/get/ontheboards
Sponsored by On the Boards in Seattle, the videos in this collection cover contemporary theatre, dance, and performance art. All are recordings of performances at either On the Boards or other arts organizations around the country.

Smithsonian Global Sound
http://libraries.mit.edu/get/globalsound
This streaming audio collection of world music provides access to over 42,000 tracks from the Smithsonian Archives and world music archives in Asia and Africa. Coverage includes over 169 countries worldwide, 1,000 genres, 1,400 cultural groups, and 450 different languages.

For more information or to learn more about how these resources may enhance research or teaching, please contact an MIT Libraries subject specialist.

 

New streaming database: Smithsonian Global Sound

Posted May 1st, 2013 by Christie Moore

Smithsonian Global Sound is now available to the MIT community. This streaming audio collection of world music provides access to over 42,000 tracks from the Smithsonian Archives and world music archives in Asia and Africa. Coverage includes over 169 countries worldwide, 1,000 genres, 1,400 cultural groups, and 450 different languages.

Shortcut URL: libraries.mit.edu/get/globalsound
(MIT certificates required)

OA research in the news: Boyden honored for optogenetics work

Posted May 1st, 2013 by Katharine Dunn

Ed Boyden, an associate professor of Biological Engineering and Brain and Cognitive Sciences, has won Brandeis University’s Jacob Heskel Gabbay Award in Biotechnology and Medicine. Boyden shares the prize with researchers at Stanford University and the University of Oxford. It honors their contributions to optogenetics, a technology now widely used to study brain activity. In March, Boyden was also honored for this work by winning (along with five others) the Grete Lundbeck European Brain Research Prize, known as the Brain Prize. Last month, Boyden traveled to the White House for President Obama’s announcement of a new initiative to understand the human brain, which will invest $100 million in research starting in 2014.

Explore Professor Boyden’s research in the Open Access Articles collection in DSpace@MIT, where it is openly accessible to the world.

Since the MIT faculty established their Open Access Policy in March 2009 they have made thousands of research papers freely available to the world via DSpace@MIT. To highlight that research, we’re offering a series of blog posts that link news stories about scholars’ work to their open access papers in DSpace.