Archive for July, 2012

MIT Press publishes new book on open access by Peter Suber

Posted July 31st, 2012 by Ellen Duranceau

The MIT press has just published a new book by Peter Suber which offers a concise introduction to open access. Suber, the key chronicler and de facto leader of the worldwide open access movement, says that the book is intended to be “short enough for busy people to read.”

In 170 pages, Suber covers all the bases: what open access is; why we should be motivated to make scholarly work openly accessible; what kinds of open access policies and approaches have emerged; how open access relates to copyright; what the economics of open access are and what impact it is having on the market for scholarly journals; and how authors can participate.

Suber, a former philosophy professor who is now Director of the Harvard Open Access Project and Faculty Fellow at the Berkman Center for Internet and Society, captures key points succinctly:

ON THE PROBLEM
“The deeper problem is that we donate time, labor, and public money to create new knowledge and then hand control over the results to businesses that believe, correctly or incorrectly, that their revenue and survival depend on limiting access to that knowledge.”

ON COPYRIGHT
“Authors who retain rights don’t violate rights belonging to publishers; they merely prevent publishers from acquiring those rights in the first place.”

ON ECONOMICS
“OA journals pay their bills the way broadcast television and radio stations do…. Those with an interest in disseminating the content pay the production costs upfront so that access can be free of charge for everyone with the right equipment.”

The book will be available in an open access edition in June 2013. Updates and supplements are available through the home page for the book.

More information:

Electronic and Print versions, along with table of contents and sample chapters

Kindle version

Open access at MIT

Study Sanctuary—Hayden’s Lipchitz Courtyard

Posted July 31st, 2012 by Heather Denny

Courtyard in bloom, photo by: Grace Liang

The Lipchitz Courtyard within Building 14 (adjacent to Hayden Library) is a hidden gem—a quiet, leafy retreat where you can find a sunny or shady spot to pull up a chair and read a book, or enjoy artwork from MIT’s Public Art Collection.  The courtyard contains three sculptures by 20th century Cubist artist Jacques Lipchitz.

The flower beds and planters in the courtyard are full of colorful flowers, thanks to the generosity of an MIT alumnus.  Stop by and see what’s in bloom!

New events-driven analysis from EIU

Posted July 17th, 2012 by Katherine McNeill

eiu logo

Do you rely on the Economist Intelligence Unit (EIU) Country Intelligence (libraries.mit.edu/get/eiu) for frequent forecasts of economic and political conditions?  Have you used their monthly Country Reports or their annual Country Commerce reports?  Now you can get even more frequent updates using EIU’s new events-driven analysis articles.

EIU provides two new kinds of articles commenting on issues and events arising since their last written Country Report:

  1. Featured analysis: ~1000 words providing detailed analysis of an issue
  2. Forecast updates: ~300 words providing:
    • Brief description of the notable event
    • Analysis of the event
    • Expected impact on the next forecast

These both can be accessed from the home page for a particular country.

In addition, one can create a Country Report on the fly to include these latest updates.  On the home page for a country, see: Reports > Generate Country Report.  To access reports from previous months or years, see: Reports > All Reports (takes you to the old EIU platform).  Note: EIU will be consolidating all of its reports onto the new platform towards the end of this year.

For more sources of country information, see the Libraries’ guide to Country Data & Analysis.

OA research in the news: Biologist Kaiser named MIT provost

Posted July 9th, 2012 by Katharine Dunn

Biology Professor Chris Kaiser started his job as provost last week, succeeding MIT’s new president, Rafael Reif. Kaiser, a cell biologist who studies protein folding, served most recently as chair of the biology department, which he joined in 1991. “At MIT, innovation is the norm, and as provost I plan not only to build upon our already-strong programs, but also to continue to foster inventive new directions in education and research,” Kaiser told the MIT News.

Explore Professor Kaiser’s research in the Open Access Articles collection in DSpace@MIT, where it is openly accessible to the world.

Since the MIT faculty established their Open Access Policy in March 2009 they have made thousands of research papers freely available to the world via DSpace@MIT. To highlight that research, we’re offering a series of blog posts that link news stories about scholars’ work to their open access papers in DSpace.

MIT Institute Archives in the Cambridge Open Archives Tour on July 12

Posted July 2nd, 2012 by Heather Denny

Fourth Annual Open Archives Tour: Famous and Infamous

The Cambridge Historical Society is hosting its fourth annual Open Archives Tour, July 9-12, 2012. MIT is participating along with eleven other organizations throughout Cambridge.

With the theme Famous and Infamous, each archive will delve into their collections to display unique materials, including photographs, correspondence, ephemera, and more, offering a rare look inside some of Cambridge’s most fascinating archives. There will be twelve archives featured over four days (three per day).

Tours and Dates:

July 9, 5:00-8:00 pm

City Collections, featuring 

  • Cambridge Historical Commission
  • Cambridge Room of the Public Library
  • Cambridge Public Works Department

July 10, 3:00-6:00 pm

Harvard Collections, featuring 

  • Harvard University Archives
  • Houghton Library at Harvard
  • Schlesinger Library at Harvard

July 11, 5:00-8:00 pm

Cultural Collections, featuring 

  • Mount Auburn Cemetery
  • Cambridge Historical Society
  • The Longfellow House – Washington’s Headquarters National Historic Site

July 12, 3:00-6:00 pm

MIT Collections, featuring 

For more information and reservations, contact: 617-547-4252 or www.cambridgearchives.org

 

Libraries closed on Independence Day

Posted July 2nd, 2012 by Grace Mlady

All MIT libraries will be closed for Independence Day, Wednesday, July 4.

The Libraries will resume regular hours on Thursday, July 5.  Please see our summer hours page for a list of library locations and hours.

Have questions? Ask Us!

OA research in the news: Zebrafish offer clues to autism

Posted July 2nd, 2012 by Katharine Dunn

Researchers led by biologist Hazel Sive are using zebrafish to help learn about the biological mechanisms behind human brain disorders like autism. In a recent paper published in the open access journal Disease Models and Mechanisms, Sive and her colleagues describe looking at a set of genes that are the same across species; deletions and duplications of the genes in humans have been associated with autism. When they silenced the genes in the fish, they found abnormal brain development. “That’s really the goal — to go from an animal that shares molecular pathways, but doesn’t get autistic behaviors, into humans who have the same pathways and do show these behaviors,” Sive told the MIT News.

Explore Professor Sive’s research in the Open Access Articles collection in DSpace@MIT, where it is openly accessible to the world.

Since the MIT faculty established their Open Access Policy in March 2009 they have made thousands of research papers freely available to the world via DSpace@MIT. To highlight that research, we’re offering a series of blog posts that link news stories about scholars’ work to their open access papers in DSpace.