Archive for March, 2012

IAPril 2012: EndNote Basics

Posted March 28th, 2012 by Mark Szarko

When:  Wed April 25, 4:00-5:00 pm

Where: 14N-132

EndNote is a “personal bibliographic software” package which allows you to create and manage a database of bibliographic references. Learn how to find and use information more effectively in our hands-on workshop. Please pre-register for this session.

For more information please contact Peter Cohn.

 

IAPril 2012 – Advanced SciFinder

Posted March 26th, 2012 by Mark Szarko

When: Fri April 27, 10:00 am – 12:00 pm

Where: 14N-132

This advanced SciFinder session includes many useful tips & tricks for chemists, including:

  • Advanced structure and reaction searching
  • All of the newest tools and content added to SciFinder
  • SciPlanner, the new synthetic planning tool for chemists
  • Bioactivity and target indicator data
  • Reaction experimental procedures
  • Real time pricing and availability information from suppliers like Aldrich and Alfa Aesar
  • And much more!

Please register for this session. For more information, please contact  Erja Kajosalo.

New streaming database: Opera in Video

Posted March 26th, 2012 by Christie Moore

Opera in Video

 

 

 

Opera in Video is now available to the MIT community. This streaming database contains 500 hours of opera performances, captured on video through staged productions, interviews, and documentaries. Selections represent some of the world’s best performers, conductors, and opera houses.

Stream video to your mobile device! All video is now supported for iPhone operating on 3G network or better and Android. Click on the mobile phone icon next to each video in the database to stream directly to your mobile device.

Check Out the Complete Listing of IAPril 2012 Sessions

Posted March 23rd, 2012 by Mark Szarko

A workshop in the DIRC, photo by L.Barry Hetherington

All sessions take place in the Digital Instruction Resource Center (DIRC), 14N-132, with the exception of the MIT Libraries Bookmobile and the Institute Archives sessions. The Bookmobile will take place in Lobby 10, and the Archives sessions will take place in 14N-118.

Pre-registration is required for some, but not all sessions. See below for details.

Patent Searching FundamentalsRegister
Tues April 3, 12:00 – 1:00 pm, 14N-132
Contact:  Howard Silver, hsilver@mit.edu

While you won’t come out of this session qualified to be a patent attorney, you will be able to successfully find patent references from all over the world and know how to obtain patent text and diagrams. The session will be a hands-on practicum that will help de-mystify the patent literature and expose attendees to key resources for finding patents through free resources available on the web.

Please register for this session.

MIT Libraries Bookmobile
Wed April 11, 11:00 am – 2:00 pm, Lobby 10
Contact: Theresa Tobin, tat@mit.edu

Celebrate National Bookmobile Day with the MIT Libraries! Check out new fiction and non-fiction, DVDs, and music (Bring your MIT ID if you want to borrow something).

RefWorks Basics
Thurs April 12, 12 – 1pm, 14N-132
Contact:  Anita Perkins, perkins@mit.edu

RefWorks is a web-based resource to help you organize references, create a bibliography, and easily cite references as you write your paper.  It allows you to create individual or group accounts.

Dear Diaries — Before There Were Blogs
Fri April 20, 11:30 am – 1:00 pm, 14N-118 (Archives reading room)
Contact: Dana Goblaskas, dgoblask@mit.edu

Have you ever wanted to take a peek inside a day in the life of an MIT student or faculty member? Come explore some diaries from the Institute Archives & Special Collections and read accounts of…

  • founder William Barton Rogers’s wedding trip
  • a world cruise
  • trekking across Texas in a covered wagon
  • a future MIT president’s teenage adventures as a ship’s radio operator
  • the founding of the United Nations
  • working with radar during World War Two
  • traveling in India, Australia, Germany, Mali, Burkina Faso, and the Azores
  • and more!

Diaries date from 1849 to 1973. You never know what adventures you’ll uncover!

This session will last 90 minutes, with a 10-minute introduction at the beginning and then time to peruse the diaries at your leisure. Drop by anytime and stay as long as you want.

Managing Your References:  Overview of EndNote, RefWorks, and ZoteroRegister
Tues April 24, 12:00 – 1:15 pm, 14N-132
Contact:  Anita Perkins, perkins@mit.edu

Using citation management software to create and maintain a collection of references is becoming more common and important in today’s academic world. These software packages (EndNote, RefWorks & Zotero) allow users to search databases, retrieve relevant citations, and build a bibliography to be added to a paper or thesis or stored for future reference. But which software package should you use, and how do you get started?

Please register for this session.

Taking Care: Family Textiles
Tue April 24, 2:00-3:00 pm, 14N-132
Contact: Ann Marie Willer, willer@mit.edu

Do you want to save an old family quilt, a wedding dress, or T-shirts and flags from your fraternity or student club?  A conservator will present this webinar on how to care for the various types of textiles found in family collections including clothing, flags, furniture coverings, and framed textiles. The session will cover how to safely store and display textiles and how to determine when the services of a professional conservator are needed.  This event is part of the American Library Association’s Preservation Week.

EndNote BasicsRegister
Wed April 25, 4:00 – 5:00 pm, 14N-132
Contact: Peter Cohn, pcohn@mit.edu

EndNote is a “personal bibliographic software” package which allows you to create and manage a database of bibliographic references. Learn how to find and use information more effectively in our hands-on workshop.

Please register for this session.

Arts and Culture Multimedia in the MIT LibrariesRegister
Thu April 26, 12:30 – 1:30 pm, 14N-132
Contact: Mark Szarko, szarko@mit.edu

Want to find out how to obtain over one million tracks of streaming audio ranging from classical to jazz, popular, and contemporary world music? How about over 150,000 online music scores? Streaming video of poets reading from their work? Images so sharp you can see the shadow beneath the Mona Lisa’s smile? Or panoramic views of architectural sites from around the world?

Come to this session to learn how to bring these and other cultural treasures right to your desktop through the MIT Libraries.

Please register for this session.

Preserving Your Personal Digital Photographs
Thu April 26, 2:00-3:00 pm, 14N-132
Contact: Ann Marie Willer, willer@mit.edu

Digital photos are fragile and require special care to keep them accessible. But preserving any kind of digital information is a new concept that most people have little experience with. Technologies change over time and become obsolete, making it difficult to access older digital photos. Learn about the nature of the problem and hear about some simple, practical tips and tools to help you keep your digital photos safe. This event is part of the American Library Association’s Preservation Week.

Advanced SciFinderRegister
Fri April 27, 10:00 am – 12:00 pm, 14N-132
Contact:  Erja Kajosalo, kajosalo@mit.edu

This advanced SciFinder session includes many useful tips & tricks for chemists, including:

  • Advanced structure and reaction searching
  • All of the newest tools and content added to SciFinder
  • SciPlanner, the new synthetic planning tool for chemists
  • Bioactivity and target indicator data
  • Reaction experimental procedures
  • Real time pricing and availability information from suppliers like Aldrich and Alfa Aesar
  • And much more!

Please register for this session.

Is It What It Is? Tools for Understanding Your Digital FilesRegister
Fri April 27, 11:30 am – 1:00 pm, 14N-118 (Archives reading room)
Contact: Kari R. Smith, smithkr@mit.edu

In this session you will be exposed to a variety of software tools that are being used in the Institute Archives for understanding digital files that are being added to the Archival collections.  These software tools aid with the process of long-term access of digital material by allowing us to know what the digital files are when we receive them, detect any changes over time, and how to make them available in the future.

We will briefly discuss how these tools fit into work flows for digital content being developed for use in the Institute Archives and Special Collections department of the MIT Libraries.

Categories of tools that will be reviewed include:  file format characterization, fixity, packaging, metadata extraction, conversion / normalization, disk imaging, and metadata embedding.

Come learn how you can know that over time your digital files are what they are!

Please register for this session.

IAPril 2012: Is It What It Is? Tools for Understanding Your Digital Files

Posted March 23rd, 2012 by Mark Szarko

When: Fri April 27, 11:30 am – 1:00 pm

Where: 14N-118 (Archives reading room)

In this session you will be exposed to a variety of software tools that are being used in the Institute Archives for understanding digital files that are being added to the Archival collections.  These software tools aid with the process of long-term access of digital material by allowing us to know what the digital files are when we receive them, detect any changes over time, and how to make them available in the future.

We will briefly discuss how these tools fit into work flows for digital content being developed for use in the Institute Archives and Special Collections department of the MIT Libraries.

Categories of tools that will be reviewed include:  file format characterization, fixity, packaging, metadata extraction, conversion / normalization, disk imaging, and metadata embedding.

Come learn how you can know that over time your digital files are what they are!

Please register for this session. For more information, please contact Kari R. Smith.

IAPril 2012: Arts and Culture Multimedia in the MIT Libraries

Posted March 23rd, 2012 by Mark Szarko

When: Thu April 26, 12:30 – 1:30 pm

Where: 14N-132

Want to find out how to obtain over one million tracks of streaming audio ranging from classical to jazz, popular, and contemporary world music? How about over 150,000 online music scores? Streaming video of poets reading from their work? Images so sharp you can see the shadow beneath the Mona Lisa’s smile? Or panoramic views of architectural sites from around the world?

Come to this session to learn how to bring these and other cultural treasures right to your desktop through the MIT Libraries.

Please register for this session. For more information, please contact Mark Szarko.

IAPril 2012: Managing Your References: Overview of EndNote, RefWorks, and Zotero

Posted March 23rd, 2012 by Mark Szarko

When: Tues April 24, 12:00 – 1:15 pm

Where: 14N-132

Using citation management software to create and maintain a collection of references is becoming more common and important in today’s academic world. These software packages (EndNote, RefWorks & Zotero) allow users to search databases, retrieve relevant citations, and build a bibliography to be added to a paper or thesis or stored for future reference. But which software package should you use, and how do you get started?

Please register for this session. For more information, please contact Anita Perkins.

IAPril 2012: Dear Diaries — Before There Were Blogs

Posted March 23rd, 2012 by Mark Szarko

When: Fri April 20, 11:30 am – 1:00 pm

Where: 14N-118 (Archives reading room)

Have you ever wanted to take a peek inside a day in the life of an MIT student or faculty member? Come explore some diaries from the Institute Archives & Special Collections and read accounts of…

  • founder William Barton Rogers’s wedding trip
  • a world cruise
  • trekking across Texas in a covered wagon
  • a future MIT president’s teenage adventures as a ship’s radio operator
  • the founding of the United Nations
  • working with radar during World War Two
  • traveling in India, Australia, Germany, Mali, Burkina Faso, and the Azores
  • and more!

Diaries date from 1849 to 1973. You never know what adventures you’ll uncover!

This session will last 90 minutes, with a 10-minute introduction at the beginning and then time to peruse the diaries at your leisure. Drop by anytime and stay as long as you want.

For more information, please contact Dana Goblaskas.

IAPril 2012: RefWorks Basics

Posted March 23rd, 2012 by Mark Szarko

When: Thurs April 12, 12 – 1pm

Where: 14N-132

RefWorks is a web-based resource to help you organize references, create a bibliography, and easily cite references as you write your paper.  It allows you to create individual or group accounts.

For more information, please contact Anita Perkins.

IAPril 2012: MIT Libraries Bookmobile

Posted March 23rd, 2012 by Mark Szarko

When: Wed April 11, 11:00 am – 2:00 pm

Where: Lobby 10

Celebrate National Bookmobile Day with the MIT Libraries! Check out new fiction and non-fiction, DVDs, and music (Bring your MIT ID if you want to borrow something).

For more information, please contact Theresa Tobin.

IAPril 2012: Patent Searching Fundamentals

Posted March 23rd, 2012 by Mark Szarko

When: Tues April 3, 12:00 – 1:00 pm

Where: 14N-132

While you won’t come out of this session qualified to be a patent attorney, you will be able to successfully find patent references from all over the world and know how to obtain patent text and diagrams. The session will be a hands-on practicum that will help de-mystify the patent literature and expose attendees to key resources for finding patents through free resources available on the web.

Please register for this session. For more information, please contact Howard Silver with any questions.

Spring vacation library hours begin Saturday, March 24

Posted March 22nd, 2012 by Grace Mlady

The MIT Libraries spring vacation hours begin on Saturday, March 24 and end Saturday, March 31.  The following is a list of libraries and hours of operation during spring vacation:

Barker, Dewey, Hayden (Humanities & Science), Rotch:

  • Monday-Friday: 9am-6pm
  • Saturday-Sunday: 1pm-6pm

Lewis Music

  • Monday-Friday: 9am-5pm
  • Saturday-Sunday: closed

 

 

Please note: Lewis Music will close early on Friday, March 23 at 5pm, and remain closed until Monday, March 26.

All libraries will resume regular hours on Sunday, April 1.  For a list of individual library locations and hours, see our library hours page.

Have questions?  Ask Us!

3 Years, 5000 Papers: MIT Faculty Open Access Articles Continue to Grow

Posted March 19th, 2012 by Ellen Duranceau

Three years after the MIT faculty established their Open Access Policy, more than 5,000 papers have been made available through the Policy.

By the end of 2011, 60% of MIT faculty had papers deposited in the Open Access Articles Collection, making their work openly available to the world.

March 18 marked the third anniversary of the faculty’s precedent-setting policy, the first university-wide faculty policy of its kind in the United States.

For more information:

MIT Faculty Open Access Policy
MIT News Story from the time of the vote on the Policy

Monthly Downloads from MIT Faculty Open Access Collection Hit New Peak

Posted March 15th, 2012 by Ellen Duranceau

Three years after the MIT Faculty Open Access Policy was established, monthly downloads from the collection of articles made available under the Policy continue to grow, reaching a new high of 30,000 in February 2012.

This news is reported as we mark the third anniversary (on March 18) of the faculty’s precedent-setting policy, the first university-wide faculty policy of its kind in the United States.

For more information:

MIT Faculty Open Access Policy
MIT News Story from the time of the vote on the Policy

Worldwide downloads of papers under the Policy

Book not available at MIT? Request it via Borrow Direct!

Posted March 15th, 2012 by Melissa Feiden

Do you need books that aren’t available at the MIT Libraries? Try Borrow Direct, a new way for you to request materials from non-MIT libraries.  Books from Borrow Direct are shipped directly to an MIT Library for you to pick up.

Borrow Direct is a rapid, patron-initiated borrowing service that allows eligible MIT community members to request books and accompanying materials from select Borrow Direct libraries using MIT’s WorldCat.  The following institutions are members of Borrow Direct: Brown University, Columbia University, Cornell University, Dartmouth College, Harvard University, Princeton University, University of Pennsylvania, Yale University.

Look for the Borrow Direct request button in MIT’s WorldCat.  If you have questions, see MIT’s WorldCat FAQ.

MIT Faculty Articles Downloaded Worldwide Through Open Access Policy

Posted March 9th, 2012 by Ellen Duranceau

Three years ago this month, the MIT Faculty established an Open Access Policy, through which their scholarly articles are made openly available on the web. The faculty’s goal was to “disseminat[e] the fruits of its research and scholarship as widely as possible.”

This goal is being met: downloads from the Open Access Articles Collection, which houses papers under the Policy, have been initiated from nearly every country in the world:

Only one-third of use originated in the United States, and while the top 20 countries account for 85% of the use (including China, India, the UK, Germany, and the Republic of Korea), downloads are widespread. Russia and Brazil each account for about 1% of the use. In a typical month such as December 2011, downloads were requested from all around the world, including (to name just a few) Azerbaijan, Bolivia, Botswana, Cote D’Ivoire, Croatia, Honduras, Malaysia, Malta, Nepal, Qatar, Slovenia, Sri Lanka, Tunisia, and Zimbabwe.

This news is reported as we mark the third anniversary (on March 18) of the faculty’s precedent-setting policy, the first university-wide faculty policy of its kind in the United States.

For more information:

MIT Faculty Open Access Policy
MIT News Story from the time of the vote on the Policy

ILLiad outage on Wednesday, March 14th from 8:30am-1:00pm

Posted March 8th, 2012 by Melissa Feiden

Please be aware that, due to a scheduled software upgrade, ILLiad will be unavailable from 8:30am–1:00pm EST this Wednesday, March 14, 2012.

During this outage, you will not be able to:

  • place new Interlibrary Borrowing requests
  • place requests for article delivery from the Library Storage Annex
  • download PDF copies of articles
  • track or change existing requests
  • renew Interlibrary Borrowing books
  • do anything that requires ILLiad

For more information, see our ILLiad system outage page.  If you have questions, Ask Us!

Panel Discussion on Libraries and Best Practices in Fair Use–Friday, March 23

Posted March 6th, 2012 by Heather Denny

Date: Friday, March 23, 2012, 2:30–5pm

Location: MIT Stata Center, Building 32, Rm. 155

Registration: Limited seating, please register in advance

What is fair use, and how can libraries use their fair use rights to better accomplish their missions? A new document, the Code of Best Practices in Fair Use for Academic and Research Libraries, provides powerful new insight into the ways that librarians can apply fair use principles to resolve recurring copyright challenges.

On Friday, March 23, 2012 the MIT Libraries will host an informative panel discussion with the co-facilitators of the Code, who are speaking to librarians around the country to introduce the Code and discuss how its principles can help solve local challenges and improve policies dealing with copyright and fair use.

Speakers include co-facilitators of the Code, Patricia Aufderheide of the Center for Social Media at American

Co-facilitators of the Code: Patricia Aufderheide and Peter Jaszi

University and Peter Jaszi of American University Law School, and local experts Kyle Courtney of Harvard University’s Law School and Jay Wilcoxson from the MIT Office of the General Counsel.

Local librarians are invited to join us for a discussion about the Code of Best Practices and how it can be useful in our community. To attend this free event, register online. Seating is limited so please register early.

The Code, along with supporting materials, is available for free online and hard copies will be also be available at the event.

About the Speakers:

Patricia Aufderheide is University Professor in the School of Communication at American University in Washington, D.C. and founder-director of the Center for Social Media there. She heads the Fair Use and Free Speech research project at the Center, in conjunction with Prof. Peter Jaszi in American University’s Washington College of Law.

Peter Jaszi teaches domestic and international copyright law, directs the Glushko-Samuelson Intellectual Property Law Clinic, and writes about copyright history and theory. He is a Trustee of the Copyright Society of the U.S.A., and a member of the editorial board of its journal.

Kyle Courtney is an intellectual property attorney presently working at Harvard Law School as the Head of External Resource Sharing and Faculty Research. His work at Harvard includes the formation of the first Library Copyright Working Group the creation of a “Copyright and Fair Use Tool” for use of the Harvard Library community.

Jay Wilcoxson is Counsel in MIT’s Office of the General Counsel since his arrival in August, 2007. His responsibilities include managing the Institute’s legal process and litigation and providing advice in connection with a wide variety of Institute affairs including a focus on intellectual property issues.

 

Lunch & Learn: You bring the food, we bring the knowledge!

Posted March 5th, 2012 by Mark Szarko

Over  the next five Tuesdays,  the MIT Libraries are launching a new series of quick demonstrations to highlight some of our resources. Called “Lunch & Learn: You Bring the Food, We Bring the Knowledge,” the series will take place every 10 minutes or so in the Information Intersection (the big orange cube in the Stata Center) between 12:00 – 1:00 p.m.

Topics covered are: Lunch & Learn: You Bring the Food, We Bring the Knowledge

•     March 6th: Making Google Scholar work with MIT resources

•     March 13th: Setting up PubMed to access MIT resources

•     March 20th: Patents

•     April 3rd: Borrow Direct- Bringing the Ivy League libraries to you

•     April 10th: Online music resources

•     April 17th: Apps for Academics

Feel free to drop in anytime from 12:00 – 1:00 p.m. These presentations are very short and informal–feel free to bring your lunch, or stop by on your way to or from the produce market. Five minutes could save you one hour!