Archive for February, 2010

authors@mit: Saša Stanišic reading March 9th

Posted February 25th, 2010 by mit-admin

Saša Stanišic will read from his new book

How the Soldier Repairs the Gramophone

Tuesday, March 9th, 6:30pm in Room 32-141

Saša Stanišic is the 2010 Max Kade Writer in Residence in Foreign Languages and Literatures at MIT, co-sponsored by the DAAD and the MIT European Club.

The authors@mit lecture series is co-sponsored by the MIT Libraries and the MIT Press Bookstore. Additional support for this event is provided by Schoenhof’s Books.

Open to the public &  wheelchair accessible.

Event info: call (617) 253-5249 or visit web.mit.edu/bookstore/www/events/

Download: event flyer

Enter the Rotch Mystery Image Contest!

Posted February 25th, 2010 by mit-admin

CONTEST RULES:

The contest will run for 3 weeks. Each week a new clue in the form of puzzle pieces will be added. Entries may be submitted at any time and you may enter once per week.
If there is more than one correct entry, the winner will be selected by a drawing.
The answer to the puzzle can be found by searching the visual collections at Rotch Library: http://info-libraries.mit.edu/rotch/collections/visual-collections/.
The correct answer must include the artist’s name, title of the work, and where you located the image.
Entries may be made using this form submitted to the box in Rotch Library or in an email to rvc-all@mit.edu.

If you enter between:
FEB 22, 5pm — MARCH 1, 5pm = your CORRECT answer will be worth 3 entries
MARCH 1, 5:01pm–MARCH 8, 5pm = your CORRECT answer will be worth 2 entries
MARCH 8, 5:01pm — MARCH 15th, 5pm = your CORRECT answer will be worth 1 entry

Note: This contest is open to MIT undergraduate and graduate students only. All entries must be submitted by March 15 at 5 pm.

East Asian Music Performance in the Music Library-Friday, March 5th

Posted February 25th, 2010 by Heather Denny

Friday, March 5th

Time: 6:30p–8:00p

Location: 14E-109, Lewis Music Library

MIT’s pungmul group, Oori, will perform a short set followed by KIOKU‘s experimental and improvisatory approach to East Asian music. MIT Visiting Assistant Professor Christopher Ariza is a member of the trio comprising KIOKU.

The NYC based ensemble KIOKU creates a new terrain between traditional Asian music and collaborative improvisation. The trio consists of MIT Visiting Assistant Professor Christopher Ariza (live electronics), Wynn Yamami (taiko and percussion), and Ali Sakkal (saxophones). The group has performed at the Vision Festival, Edgetone Summit, Galapagos, Rubin Museum, and Noguchi Museum, and held an artist residency at the Issue Project Room in Brooklyn, New York. KIOKU’s premier CD, Both Far and Near, was described in All About Jazz as “fiercely aggressive in its crusade for a powerful, liberated music that takes the great tradition of free jazz and steeps it in Japanese spirituality.”

Oori, MIT’s student pungmul group, performs traditional Korean music. Employing jang-goo (an hour-glass shaped drum), kwaeng-ga-ri, (a small gong), jing (a larger gong), and buk (a barrel drum), Oori brings to life musical traditions extending back hundreds of years. The group consists of MIT students and community members from a variety of backgrounds.

This event is free and open to the public.  It is co-sponsored by the MIT Libraries and the Music and Theater Arts Section.

Four Publishers Confirm Cooperation with MIT Open Access Policy

Posted February 24th, 2010 by Ellen Duranceau

Hindawi Publishing, Rockefeller University Press, the Society for Industrial & Applied Mathematics (SIAM), and the University of California Press have confirmed cooperation with the MIT Faculty Open Access Policy. The Policy, established last March, makes the MIT faculty’s scholarly articles openly available on the web.

oapolicylogofinal

Because all four of these publishers are allowing MIT to obtain copies of their final published articles from their website, authors do not need to submit their manuscripts in order for them to appear in DSpace@MIT. This will happen automatically.


To review other confirmed publisher responses to the policy, please see: Publishers and the MIT Faculty Open Access Policy. Publishers are being added to this web page as information becomes available. Please send any questions about publishers not yet on the page to copyright-lib@mit.edu.

For more information:

MIT Faculty Open Access Policy

Details on working with the policy

Industrial Landscapes of Trinidad – Photography exhibition

Posted February 9th, 2010 by mit-admin

Mention of the Caribbean usually conjures mental images of sun, sea and sand. Mention of Trinidad and Tobago may invoke images of carnival and steelpan. This exhibition presents photographs  of another side of the twin-island state – its industrial landscape, specifically, the areas developed by heavy industries in the oil and gas sectors.

On view at Rotch Library (7-238) now through February 25, 2010.

Photographer: Kristal Peters

Funded (in part) by a Director’s Grant from the Council for the Arts at MIT, and MIT’s Caribbean Club.

For more information, click here.

Shortcuts to Your Favorite Library Databases!

Posted February 5th, 2010 by mit-admin

Have a favorite database and want to avoid searching Vera for it every time? Use the Get URL! Do a search in Vera by title and then just right click to add the link to your bookmarks. Now Proquest, Avery, PubMed and others are just a click away, whether you’re on campus or off!

GIS Lab Hours Resume Tuesday 2/2/2010

Posted February 2nd, 2010 by Lisa Sweeney

Regular GIS lab hours are:
Monday-Thursday
12:30-4 pm

These hours will run through the term : Feb. 2 – May 13

If you have a GIS question, but cannot attend regular lab hours please email gishelp@mit.edu A brief description of the question, what you are working on, and the geographic area of interest is helpful.

For those less familiar with MIT GIS Services:

We provide consultation to assist with the challenges that can arise with Geographic Information System (GIS) projects. We help people think through their project ideas and learn how to use the tools they need. We also help people find and use GIS data, available from diverse sources in a variety of formats. MIT GIS Services supports GIS in teaching and research in all disciplines at MIT. We help support a dynamic community working to solve exciting, real-life problems in many different departments.

Geographic Information Systems (GIS) enable users to visualize and analyze spatial information in a dynamic, digital environment. It provides tools for integrating, querying and analyzing a wide variety of data types, such as scientific and cultural data, satellite imagery and aerial photography, as well as data collected by individuals, into projects, with geographic locations providing the integral link between all the data.

Technology & Enlightenment in the Maihaugen Gallery

Posted February 2nd, 2010 by Heather Denny

A new exhibit opens in the Libraries’ Maihaugen Gallery on Wednesday, February 3. Technology and Enlightenment: The Mechanical Arts in Diderot’s Encyclopédie explores one of the most important and controversial publications of the eighteenth century, Diderot’s Encyclopédie, ou Dictionnaire raisonné des sciences, des arts et des métiers.

This massive work became infamous in its day as an enlightened attack on French and European religious dogmatism and monarchical inefficiency and injustice. Containing over 2,500 elaborately engraved plates, it documented the mechanical arts and technology, placing equal importance on the manual trades as the arts and sciences.

Curated by Jeffrey S. Ravel, MIT Associate Professor of History, and Kristel Smentek, MIT Assistant Professor of Art History, the exhibit features fascinating images chosen from the 32 original folio volumes owned by the MIT Libraries, as well as multimedia components illustrating the Encylopedie’s significance.  The exhibit is open to the public Mon.-Thurs. during gallery hours, and runs through July 2010.

American Meteorological Society Confirms Full Cooperation With MIT Faculty Open Access Policy

Posted February 2nd, 2010 by Ellen Duranceau

The American Meteorological Society (AMS) has confirmed that their recently adopted policy on open access repositories is fully consistent with the new MIT Faculty Open Access Policy.

oapolicylogofinal

The AMS, which publishes 13 journals, including the Journal of Climate and Monthly Weather Review, has just established a new policy to support the “increasing demand for institutions to provide open access to the published research being produced at that institution.” Their policy allows for the posting of the published articles into a repository like MIT’s DSpace@MIT.


Because the AMS is allowing MIT to obtain copies of their final published articles from their website, authors do not need to submit their manuscripts in order for them to appear in DSpace@MIT. This will happen automatically.

To review other confirmed publisher responses to the policy, please see: Publishers and the MIT Faculty Open Access Policy. Publishers are being added to this web page as information becomes available. Please send any questions about publishers not yet on the page to copyright-lib@mit.edu.

For more information:

MIT Faculty Open Access Policy

Details on working with the policy

New Podcast: Craig Carter on the MIT Faculty Open Access Policy

Posted February 1st, 2010 by Ellen Duranceau

The latest in the series of podcasts on scholarly publication and copyright is an interview with Craig Carter, Professor of Materials Science and Engineering. He directs the Carter Research Group, which uses modeling to predict complex material behavior.

In the podcast, Professor Carter speaks about the MIT Faculty Open Access Policy from his perspective as a member of the faculty committee that put the policy forward for a faculty vote in March of 2009. Under the policy, the faculty gives MIT nonexclusive permission to make the faculty’s scholarly articles available and to exercise the copyright in those articles for the purpose of open dissemination.

He reflects on the “swiftness with which [the committee] reached consensus” about changes needed in the publishing environment, and his belief that “participation in the [policy] will help us do our job better by allowing us to freely distribute our works.”

Download the audio file. (5:32 minutes)

More information:

To subscribe to the MIT Libraries’ Podcasts on Scholarly Publishing, paste this link into iTunes or another podcast reader: http://feeds.rapidfeeds.com/6772/

We encourage and welcome your feedback, which you may direct to copyright-lib@mit.edu.