Archive for January, 2010

IAP 2010: Demystifying Fair Use – An Interactive Workshop for Users of Copyrighted Content

Posted January 6th, 2010 by Ryan Gray

This session is for anyone who wants to know more about Fair Use, which allows for reuse of copyrighted content, whether in publications, student work, or for personal use.

Offered by an intellectual property specialist in the General Counsel’s office and the copyright contact in the MIT Libraries, the session will explain Fair Use in US copyright law, and provide an opportunity for attendees to apply the concept to real and hypothetical cases. There will be ample time for individual questions.

WHEN: Wednesday, January 27, 1 – 2:15pm

WHERE: 1-150

Contact copyright-lib@mit.edu for more information.

Check out the MIT Libraries’ full schedule of IAP sessions.

IAP 2010: LabLife Tutorial

Posted January 6th, 2010 by Ryan Gray

LabLife provides free lab management software to biologists.

Learn how LabLife can help you organize your lab materials, coordinate lab ordering, analyze DNA sequences, and more! Also, meet the MIT alums behind the software.

WHEN: Tuesday, January 26, 12:30 – 1:30pm

WHERE: DIRC, 14N-132

Enrollment is on a first-come, first-served basis and limited to 20 participants.

Contact Amy Stout with any questions.

Check out the MIT Libraries’ full schedule of IAP sessions.

IAP 2010: Middle East Blogsphere: Who Are They? Where Are They Archived?

Posted January 6th, 2010 by Ryan Gray

Who are the main bloggers in the Middle East?

How are they changing the culture of communication in the region?

Where are the blogs archived?

Come and hear this exciting presentation that shows the dynamics of change in the Middle East in blogsphere.

WHEN: Tuesday, January 26, 12 – 1pm

WHERE: Rotch Library conference room, 7-238

This session is limited to 15 participants and advance sign-up is required. Please contact Omar Khalidi with questions or to sign up.

Check out the MIT Libraries’ full schedule of IAP sessions.

IAP 2010: Practically Genomic

Posted January 6th, 2010 by Ryan Gray

Genomics, microarrays, and massively parallel applications such as next generation sequencing have made biology research a highly quantitative field. As a result, many biologists face the challenge of mastering computers and computational methods. Our sessions are designed to begin the process.

We will provide an overview of some of the bioinformatics tools and methods mandated by modern biological research. Practical examples will be used to introduce powerful aspects of the Unix operating system, Perl, R, Excel and MySQL. We will also instruct attendees on the usage of bioinformatics tools for genomics, phylogenetics and microarray data analysis. Topics to be covered include the UCSC genome browser, GALAXY, Argo, GenePattern, Bioconductor, ClustalX, and a variety of functional annotation methods.

NOTE: Enrollment is limited to 20 participants, on a first-come, first-served basis. Participants are requested to attend all sessions. Please see this page to prepare for the sessions (links, presentations, data, downloads, etc.).

WHEN: Monday, January 25, Wednesday, January 27, and Friday, January 29, 11am – 1pm

WHERE: DIRC, 14N-132

Contact Charlie Whittaker or Courtney Crummett with any questions.

Check out the MIT Libraries’ full schedule of IAP sessions.

This session is co-sponsored by the David H. Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research.

IAP 2010: Introduction to Company and Industry Research for Engineers and Scientists

Posted January 6th, 2010 by Ryan Gray

You may be a skilled investigator on the topic of science or engineering, but what do you know about business research? This session will introduce you to library-supported databases that cover company and industry information. We will use hands-on exercises to demonstrate strategies for researching two key components of a business plan: competitors and industry trends.

WHEN: Friday, January 22, 12 – 1pm

WHERE: DIRC, 14N-132

Contact Stephanie Hartman with any questions.

Check out the MIT Libraries’ full schedule of IAP sessions.

IAP 2010: Cool Tools for Science and Engineering Research: Meet the Developers!

Posted January 6th, 2010 by Ryan Gray


Learn about new tools to support your research, collaboration, and personal knowledge management. Three developers will demonstrate their applications.

QUOSA Information Manager can help streamline your literature management. Search for articles and retrieve one or many PDFs in a single step from PubMed, Web-of-Knowledge, and other databases. Organize and manage your existing article PDF collections, and share them with your group in real time.

WebNotes Academic is the world’s first research tool that allows you to annotate PDF documents and web pages, all seamlessly while online.

ResearchGATE is a scientific network that connects researchers. Find research partners, collaborate with scientists and explore journal articles.

WHEN: Thursday, January 21, 4 – 5pm

WHERE: 2-105

Contact Howard Silver with any questions.

Check out the MIT Libraries’ full schedule of IAP sessions.

IAP 2010: Patent Searching Fundamentals

Posted January 6th, 2010 by Ryan Gray

While you won’t come out of this session qualified to be a patent attorney, you will be able to successfully find patent references from all over the world and know how to obtain patent text and diagrams.

The session will be a hands-on practicum that will help de-mystify the patent literature and expose attendees to key resources for finding patents through free resources available on the web.

No pre-registration, but space is limited so come early!

WHEN: Wednesday, January 20, 5 – 6pm & Thursday, January 21, 12 – 1pm (duplicate session)

WHERE: DIRC, 14N-132

Contact Darcy Duke with any questions.

Check out the MIT Libraries’ full schedule of IAP sessions.

IAP 2010: Geographic Information Systems (GIS) Workshops

Posted January 6th, 2010 by Ryan Gray

MIT GIS Services will be offering a series of workshops to introduce the MIT community to Geographic Information Systems and the world of Digital Mapping. All workshops will combine lectures about concepts with hands-on exercises.

MIT GIS Services are cooperatively supported by the MIT Libraries, the Office of Educational Innovation and Technology (OEIT), and MIT Information Services & Technology (IS&T).

WHERE: All sessions take place in the DIRC (14N-132), with the exception of the Python session (see below), which takes place in the Rotch Library, 7-238.

NOTE: Advance sign-up is required by January 19 for several sessions – see notes below.

Check out the GIS website for copies of presentations, exercises and more. Also check out the MIT Libraries’ complete listing of IAP offerings.

Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS)
Learn the basics of visualizing and analyzing geographic information and creating your own maps in a GIS. Learn to work with data from the MIT Geodata Repository, analyze the data and create maps that can be used in reports and presentations. Registration is required and this workshop is only open to people with MIT kerberos accounts.

WHEN: Friday, January 15, 2 – 4pm & Tuesday, January 19, 2 – 4pm (duplicate session)

ModelBuilder for beginners
Learn to build graphic models of your GIS processes. ESRI’s ModelBuilder helps you to visualize the process you use and makes it easy to document your work for thesis or for publication. We will create models to automate processes learned in the ‘Site Selection’ workshop. This session is targeted toward beginners.

WHEN: Wednesday, January 20, 10:30-11:30am

Introduction to Spatial Statistics using GIS
Have you ever wondered if your data is dispersed or clustered? Are there patterns? This workshop will introduce participants to basic statistical tools that can be used to analyze spatial data. While we will primarily use ArcGIS, we will also briefly discuss alternative software for analyzing spatial data. A basic knowledge of statistics and GIS (especially ArcGIS) is helpful. Registration is required and this workshop is only open to people with MIT kerberos accounts.

WHEN: Wednesday, January 20, 2 – 4pm

Mapping and Using US Census Data
The US Census holds an enormous amount of demographic information dating back to 1790. New and interesting relationships can be observed when looking at census data on a map. Come learn about what is in the US Census and how to use some of the tools available for mapping it.

WHEN: Thursday, January 21, 2 – 4pm

Site Selection – Making Spatial Decisions Using a GIS
Learn to select a new project location based on a variety of data types and perform analysis using tools provided in ArcGIS. Pre-requisite: Participants should take the Introduction to GIS or have previous experience using ArcGIS.

WHEN: Friday, January 22, 2 – 4pm

Using Elevation Data and Hydrographic Tools in a GIS
Learn to read a topographic map and how to use a digital elevation model to create contour lines and do hydrographic analysis. Pre-requisite: Participants should take the Introduction to GIS or have previous experience using ArcGIS.

WHEN: Monday, January 25, 2 – 4pm

Model Builder for Programmers
Learn to use model builder for automating complex processes in GIS. This tool is useful for increasing efficiency and documenting your work. We will create models to automate processes learned in the ‘Elevation and Hydrographic Tools’ and ‘Site Selection’ workshops. Pre-requisite: Participants should take the Introduction to GIS or have previous experience using ArcGIS.

WHEN: Tuesday, Januray 26, 2 – 4pm

Python Programming for GIS
An introduction to scripting for geographic analysis systems. Scripting in Python is an efficient method of automating analysis in ArcGIS. An understanding of programming concepts is useful; an intermediate level of ArcGIS is necessary.

WHEN: Wednesday, January 27, Thursday, January 28, and Friday, January 29, 9am – 12pm

Please fill out this survey, as there are several technical considerations for this class.

Contact Daniel Sheehan or David Quinn with questions about the Python session or the GIS staff for general questions about the rest of the sessions.

IAP 2010: Power Up with Maps! GIS and Energy Resources

Posted January 6th, 2010 by Ryan Gray

Where are the power plants and the pipelines? How close are they to population centers?

In this session, MIT GIS Services will introduce you to energy maps and spatial data available, and demonstrate GIS in action on the energy front.

WHEN: Monday, January 11, 1 – 2pm

WHERE: DIRC, 14N-132

Contact Anne Graham with any questions.

Check out the MIT Libraries’ full schedule of IAP sessions.

This session is co-sponsored by the MIT Energy Initiative.

IAP 2010: Going Beyond Google Scholar: Using the Web of Science and Other Citation Searching Resources to Discover Articles

Posted January 6th, 2010 by Ryan Gray

The Web of Science has changed its search interface substantially in 2008. Learn about the new citation analysis and report features which enable you to quickly find relevant articles. Also learn about other Web sites that provide citation searching, a powerful tool in finding information for research.

WHEN: Tuesday, January 19, 12:30 – 1:30pm & Wednesday, January 27, 5 – 6pm (duplicate session)

WHERE: DIRC, 14N-132

Contact Michael Noga with questions.

Check out the MIT Libraries’ full schedule of IAP sessions.

IAP 2010: Using NCBI's BLAST

Posted January 6th, 2010 by Ryan Gray


Want to know more about how BLAST works and how to use it more effectively in your research? Then this class is for you! This class will follow up on Bioinformatics for Beginners and lead into Advanced Bioinformatics, although attendance at the other sessions is not necessary.

WHEN: Tuesday, January 19, 11 – 12am

WHERE: DIRC, 14N-132

Enrollment is on a first-come, first-served basis and is limited to 20 participants.

Contact Courtney Crummett with questions.

Check out the MIT Libraries’ full schedule of IAP sessions.

This session is co-sponsored by the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science department.

IAP 2010: Keeping Current: Using RSS Feeds to Stay Ahead in Your Research

Posted January 6th, 2010 by Ryan Gray

What’s an RSS feed? How can I use it to keep up with new information in my field? We’ll show you how RSS and other current awareness tools can help you stay up to date!

This will be a hands-on session on Windows PCs. You are also welcome to bring your own laptop.

WHEN: Friday, January 16, 12 – 1pm

WHERE: DIRC, 14N-132

Enrollment is on a first-come, first-served basis and is limited to 25 participants.

Contact Darcy Duke with any questions.

Check out the MIT Libraries’ full schedule of IAP sessions.

IAP 2010: Tips & Techniques for Searching for Images Online

Posted January 6th, 2010 by Ryan Gray

Searching for visual content in online environments is often confusing even for those who are quite experienced with text-based searching. An effective search and discovery method for images requires that one become more visually literate. In fact, because of the current proliferation of images visual literacy has increased in importance during the 21st century.

This session will focus on strategies for finding images in image repositories. Tips will be offered to help you construct an effective search. Unidentified images will be projected and participants will analyze and “interpret” the images in order to understand how to retrieve them in the digital environment. Participants will have an opportunity to practice searching through challenging hands-on exercises.

WHEN: Thursday, January 14, 2:30 – 3:30pm

WHERE: DIRC, 14N-132

Contact Jolene de Verges with any questions.

Check out the MIT Libraries’ full schedule of IAP sessions.

IAP 2010: Finding Research Datasets: ICPSR and the Harvard-MIT Data Center

Posted January 6th, 2010 by Ryan Gray

Need data to answer a research question? Interested in analyzing raw datasets with micro-level records about individual respondents?

This hands-on workshop will familiarize you with the resources of the Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research (ICPSR) and the Harvard-MIT Data Center, which provide access to datasets in the social sciences and related fields. Topics will include the structure of data files, finding and downloading datasets, and understanding data documentation.

NOTE: Advance sign-up is required. Registration due by January 11. This session is limited to 20 participants.

WHEN: Thursday, January 14, 1 – 2:30pm

WHERE: DIRC, 14N-132

Contact Kate McNeill with any questions and/or to register.

Check out other Social Science Data Services IAP sessions as well as the MIT Libraries’ full schedule of IAP sessions.

IAP 2010: Making Your Own Videos for the Web & MIT TechTV

Posted January 6th, 2010 by Ryan Gray

Web video is suddenly everywhere. From YouTube to MIT’s own MIT TechTV, it seems like everyone is creating and posting video on the Internet. Now you can join the club. In this seminar, you’ll learn the basics of video production, digital video editing and how to post your finished piece on sites such as MIT TechTV. No experience necessary. A laptop loaded with some kind of digital editing software (Apple iMovie, Final Cut Pro, Windows MovieMaker, etc.) is nice but not required.

Enrollment is limited to 20 participants and is on a first-come, first-served basis. Participants are welcome at individual sessions or the entire series.

All sessions will be held in the DIRC, 14N-132.

A Focus on Shooting and Lighting
In this session, we will be covering the basics of shooting & lighting.
Friday, January 8, 1 – 2pm

A Focus on Audio
In this session, we will be covering the basics of audio and microphones.
Thursday, January 14, 11am – 12pm

A Focus on Digital Video Editing
In this session, we will be covering the basics of digital video editing.
Friday, January 22, 10 – 11am

A Focus on Compression and Posting to the Web
In this session, we will be covering the basics of compression and on how to compress and post your video on the web.
Thursday, January 28, 10:30 – 11:30am

Contact Kris Brewer with any questions.

Check out the MIT Libraries’ full schedule of IAP sessions.

These sessions are co-sponsored by Academic Media Production Services (AMPS).

IAP 2010: Course Reserves Overview

Posted January 6th, 2010 by Ryan Gray

Are you new to teaching or TAing at MIT, or are you an Admin Assistant who supports teaching faculty? Or do you just want to learn more about course reserves and copyright?

The MIT Libraries can help! We’ll help you navigate through the ins and outs of print and electronic courses reserves, and provide an overview of “fair use” and other copyright restrictions for course materials. We’ll also cover details about submitting required textbook information so that it can be displayed for students in Stellar.

Reserves staff from around the MIT Libraries will be available to answer questions.

WHEN: Tuesday, January 12, 11am – 12pm

WHERE: Rotch Library, 7-134A

Light refreshments will be provided.

Please sign-up to help us gauge attendance.

Contact Roshni Gohil with any questions.

IAP 2010: Writing and Formatting Your Thesis: Don't Let WORD Get You Down

Posted January 5th, 2010 by Ryan Gray

Are you writing your thesis this year? This one-hour interactive tutorial led by a recent PhD graduate will illustrate some simple shortcuts you can take in Microsoft Word to make thesis formatting a breeze (automatically generating/updating table of contents, applying consistent formatting throughout the document, etc.), saving you many precious hours.

There are 20 PCs available on a first-come, first-serve basis or you can bring your own laptop.

WHEN: Wednesday, January 13, 4 – 5pm

WHERE: DIRC, 14N-132

Contact Lourdes Aleman with any questions.

Check out the MIT Libraries’ full schedule of IAP sessions.

This session is co-sponsored by the Biology department.

IAP 2010: BrainNavigator Demo: Interactive Atlas & 3D Brain Imaging Software

Posted January 5th, 2010 by Ryan Gray

Join us for a hands-on demo of BrainNavigator, a new product sponsored by the MIT Libraries.

Navigating brain structures is complex—especially in small subjects like rats and mice. It’s easy to get lost as you view structures, make injections and analyze research. BrainNavigator is a collaboration between Elsevier and the Allen Institute for Brain Science, and it helps you locate the positions of structures within the brain, making visualization and understanding the brain easier.

Learn to use BrainNavigator to:
• Browse and compare diagrams
• View high-resolution images at the cellular level
• Compare rat and mouse brains using a unified nomenclature
• Compare BrainNavigator information with your own content

WHEN: Wednesday, January 13, 2 – 3pm

WHERE: DIRC, 14N-132

Contact Remlee Green with any questions.

Check out the MIT Libraries’ full schedule of IAP sessions.

This session is co-sponsored by the Brain and Cognitive Sciences department.

IAP 2010: Power-up!: Energy Industry Resources

Posted January 5th, 2010 by Ryan Gray

Interested in researching or working in the field of energy? Want to find out how your energy project fits into the landscape of various industries? This session will give you the skills to research the business and statistical information on energy to find industry overviews, market research, news and data.

WHEN: Wednesday, January 13, 1 – 2pm

WHERE: DIRC, 14N-132

Contact Katherine McNeill with any questions.

Check out the MIT Libraries’ full schedule of IAP sessions.

IAP 2010: EndNote Basics

Posted January 5th, 2010 by Ryan Gray

EndNote is a “personal bibliographic software” package which allows you to create and manage a database of bibliographic references.

Attendees will create a personal database of cited literature by importing references from resources such as Barton, Web of Science, PubMed, & other sources of published literature. Your database can be used to automatically generate in-text citations and bibliographies in your manuscripts. It can also help you organize and manage your PDF files.

WHEN: Wednesday, January 13, 12 – 1pm, Tuesday, January 19, 5 – 6pm, or Monday, January 25, 5 – 6pm

WHERE: DIRC, 14N-132

Contact Peter Cohn with any questions.

Check out the MIT Libraries’ full schedule of IAP sessions.