Archive for April, 2008

Video Recordings of IAP 2008: Sessions Now Available

Posted April 30th, 2008 by Ryan Gray

Peter teachin’
Were you unable to attend a Libraries’ sponsored IAP session this January? Wish you could have attended the March workshops on Building an EndNote Library, or the recent class on Google Maps?

The Libraries are pleased to unveil recordings of our popular workshops. The sessions were recorded in cooperation with Academic Media Production Services (AMPS) and are viewable both on and off campus with your MIT Certificates.

To see a list of recordings, go to the MIT Libraries Video Tutorials page and scroll down to Videos of Recent Workshops.

Contact Angie Locknar with any questions.

Video Contest: Student Views on Information Sharing

Posted April 30th, 2008 by Ellen Duranceau

sparkmindmashup2big.png The Second Annual Sparky Awards, a contest that recognizes the best new short videos on the value of information sharing, were announced today.

The 2008 contest theme is “MindMashup: The Value of Information Sharing.” Videos of two minutes or less that “imaginatively portray the benefits of the open, legal exchange of information” are due by November 30, 2008.   The winner receives a $1000 cash award.

The Sparky Awards are sponsored by SPARC (the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition) with additional co- sponsorship by the Association of College and Research Libraries, the Association of Research Libraries, Penn Libraries (at the University of Pennsylvania), Students for Free Culture, and The Student PIRGs.

For more information see:

Details about this year’s contest.

Last year’s winning entries.

MIT Libraries Puzzle Challenge – Sixth Puzzle Launched!

Posted April 29th, 2008 by Ryan Gray

Puzzle piece
The MIT Libraries have launched the sixth puzzle in a series of puzzles that can be solved using Libraries’ resources. The puzzles will be released over the course of the Spring 2008 semester, appearing in the Tech, on kiosks in Lobby 7, and elsewhere around campus. MIT students can view the puzzle and submit their answers online at http://libraries.mit.edu/puzzle. Correct answers submitted by the deadline will be entered into a drawing for an Apple iPod Nano.

The deadline for entries for the sixth puzzle is Monday, May 5, 2008.

Congratulations to Jenn Young, winner of the fifth puzzle!

New CD by MIT Wind Ensemble

Posted April 29th, 2008 by Christie Moore

Solo Eclipse

Solo Eclipse, the new CD by the MIT Wind Ensemble (MITWE), has just been received by the Lewis Music Library. This exciting disc contains world premiere recordings commissioned by Dr. Frederick Harris and MITWE. Click on the cover image to see the Barton catalog record.

Music CDs and DVDs circulate for 3 days (limit of 5; no renewals). The Lewis Music Library is located in Bldg. 14E-109 and library hours are posted on the web.

Welcome spring with music CDs!

Posted April 28th, 2008 by Christie Moore

Thinking about birds, flowers, and good weather? Here are a few spring-related themes on music CDs in the Lewis Music Library, selected from the more than 18,000 CDs in the collection. Click on an image to view its Barton catalog record:

Just-spring
Duke, John. Just-spring:
art songs. [Kolb, Toglia]
PhonCD D886 song
Peer Gynt
Grieg. Edvard. Peer Gynt,
op.23. [Järvi]
PhonCD G871 pe a
Messiaen
Messiaen, Olivier. Petites
esquisses d’oiseaux;
Catalogue d’oiseaux.
[Austbø]
PhonCD M563 petes
 
Rainbow body
Spano, Robert. Rainbow
body: Theofanidis, Barber,
Copland, Higdon. [Atlanta
Symphony]
PhonCD Sp24 rai
Spring awakening
Spring awakening: a new
musical. [Original
Broadway cast]
1487849 precat
Where the wild things are
Woolf, Randall. Where the
wild things are; based on the
book by Maurice Sendak.
[Various performers]
PhonCD W884 whe

Music CDs and DVDs circulate for 3 days (limit of 5; no renewals). The Lewis Music Library is located in Bldg. 14E-109 and library hours are posted on the web.

New USGS Landsat Image Policy

Posted April 24th, 2008 by Lisa Sweeney

By February 2009, any Landsat archive scene selected by a user will be processed, at no charge, automatically to a standard product recipe and staged for electronic retrieval. In addition, newly acquired scenes meeting a cloud cover threshold of 20% or below will be processed to the standard recipe and placed on line for at least three months, after which they will remain available for selection from the archive. The USGS is pursuing an aggressive schedule to provide users with electronic access to any Landsat scene held in the USGS-managed national archive of global scenes dating back to Landsat 1, launched in 1972. Details can be found in the USGS Technical Announcement.

More Access to M&A Deals through Zephyr

Posted April 23rd, 2008 by Katherine McNeill

BVD logoBureau van Dijk’s Zephyr database is now available at MIT: http://libraries.mit.edu/get/zephyr. Zephyr provides:

  • summaries and financial details about worldwide corporate mergers & acquisitions
  • transactions such as IPOs, buyouts, and joint ventures
  • private equity and venture capital financing details

How does Zephyr compare with SDC Platinum?

  • Zephyr is web-based and requires no software download
  • Zephyr also provides access to more recent deals (no 30-day embargo) and adds more deals each year
  • SDC Platinum data goes back to 1980s (Zephyr goes back to 2000 (1998 for European deals))
  • The databases can have different coverage so you may want to utilize both

Try out Zephyr and tell us what you think! Send your questions and comments to Alex Caracuzzo (alex3@mit.edu).

IAPril 2008 – Citation Surfing: Using Databases to Track Article Citations

Posted April 22nd, 2008 by Ryan Gray

Google Scholar logo            Web of Science logo

Citation Surfing: Using Databases to Track Article Citations
Michael Noga

Learn how to find and use information more effectively in our hands-on workshops. No advanced registration required. Light refreshments will be served at each session.

**NOTE that different events will be happening throughout the month of April and early May.**

WHERE: 14N-132 (Digital Instruction Resource Center – DIRC)

WHEN: Friday, May 2, 12pm (noon)

Have your ever used the Web of Science to find citations? Have you used Google Scholar? Perhaps you have used citation links in journal articles. This session will explore the different ways you can use citation searching to identify literature on a subject.

Sponsored by the MIT Libraries.

Contact the Science Library for more information.

More online books now available through CRCnetBASE

Posted April 22nd, 2008 by Remlee Green

CRCnetBASE logo

The MIT Libraries now subscribe to over 2,000 e-books from CRC Press, adding 7 new subject collections, including chemistry, engineering, energy, materials science and polymers, nanotechnology, and mathematics.

To search all titles available to the MIT Community, visit CRCnetBASE, or go to each individual subject collection to browse titles.  With time, we will add records of these items to our catalog, Barton to make finding them easier.

List of individual CRCnetBASEs added to our collections:

Previously subscribed: Combined Chemical Dictionary and CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics through CHEMnetBASE.

To see other e-books provided by the MIT Libraries, go to Vera, and select the subject “E-Books.”

Social Explorer adds Census Maps and Data from 1790 to 1930

Posted April 17th, 2008 by Lisa Sweeney

Social Explorer provides over 3200 maps, and thousands of variables, painting a picture of US population change from 1790 to 2000. The MIT Libraries’ subscription to Social Explorer provides the MIT community with access to the full set of data, for all years if you use this url to enter the website: http://libraries.mit.edu/get/explorer

1790 % US Urban Population

Patriot’s Day Weekend Bookmobile

Posted April 16th, 2008 by mit-admin

Bookmobile graphic

Come see, and check out, highlights from The Humanities Library‘s book and DVD collections, and The Lewis Music Library‘s music collections.

Details:

  • Date: Thursday April 17th, 2008
  • Time: 10:30AM – 2:30PM
  • Where: Lobby 10
  • Cost: FREE!!!

Violin music concert Friday noon, 4/18/08

Posted April 16th, 2008 by Christie Moore

violinDon’t forget! The 6th annual Prokopoff violin music concert will be held from noon-1 pm on Friday, April 18th, 2008 in the Lewis Music Library. Concert coordinator Sherman Jia (G) has lined up MIT student musicians Mark Avara ’08, Albert Chow ’08, Karen Chu ’08, Laura Jacox ’08, David Somach ’11, Jason Wallace ’10, Amy Xu (G), and accompanist Hsin-Bei Lee to perform works by Bach, Gershwin, Halvorsen, Kreisler, and Sarasate.

The Lewis Music Library is located in Bldg. 14E-109 and the concert is free and open to the public. The opening celebration for the MIT Libraries’ Maihaugen Gallery follows this concert. Come join us!

ICPSR Summer Program in Quantitative Methods: a Summer of Statistics and Fun!

Posted April 15th, 2008 by Katherine McNeill

Need to expand your skills in statistical methods and quantitative analysis? Attend the ICPSR Summer Program! Each year, ICPSR provides a comprehensive, integrated program of studies in research design, statistics, data analysis, and social science methodology. Registration is now open for the 2008 session. For a listing of course offerings and application information, see the ICPSR Summer Program web site.

Note: Small stipends are available to support attendance by a limited number of MIT students. For more information contact Katherine McNeill-Harman at mcneillh@mit.edu.

IAPril 2008: EndNote basics

Posted April 15th, 2008 by Ryan Gray

EndNote
EndNote Basics
Peter Cohn, Anita Perkins

Learn how to find and use information more effectively in our hands-on workshops. No advanced registration required. Light refreshments will be served at each session.

**NOTE that different events will be happening throughout the month of April and early May.**

WHERE: 14N-132 (Digital Instruction Resource Center – DIRC)

WHEN: Friday, April 25, 12pm (noon)

EndNote is a “personal bibliographic software” package which allows you to create and manage a database of bibliographic references.

Sponsored by the MIT Libraries.

Contact the Science Library for more information.

Introduction to Google Maps API – April 16th, 5pm, 14N-132

Posted April 14th, 2008 by Lisa Sweeney

Google Maps

Introduction to Google Maps API (5 – 6 pm)

Googler Pamela Fox will give a whirlwind tour of the Google Maps API and KML, teaching the basics of each and showing off some of the really fun applications of them (like campus maps, interactive panoramas, and fantasy worlds).

Google Maps Codelab (6 – 7 pm)

Interactive codelabs in the topics addressed in the Introduction to Google Maps API. Codelab participants should come prepared with basic Javascript or XML experience, and will find debugging the Maps API easier if they have Firebug installed.

Both sessions will be held in 14N-132.

Food will be provided

Email gishelp at mit.edu if you have questions.

Complete Dictionary of Scientific Biography: Your Favorite Scientists, from A to Z!

Posted April 11th, 2008 by mit-admin

dsb2.jpgHave you even been in Building 10 and wondered what exactly Vannevar Bush did to get the Bush Room named after him? Have you ever looked at the names on the buildings around Killian Court and asked yourself, what’s so great about Chladni, Gramme, and Regnault that their names are carved alongside Darwin, Faraday, and Ben Franklin?

Wonder no more! They’re just a few of the more than 5000 scientists and mathematicians profiled in the Complete Dictionary of Scientific Biography. All 18 volumes of the classic work Dictionary of Scientific Biography are now available online, supplemented by the eight volumes of the recently published New Dictionary of Scientific Biography, which adds almost 800 new authoritative profile.

IAPril 2008: Bioinformatics for Beginners

Posted April 11th, 2008 by Ryan Gray

NCBI logo
Bioinformatics for Beginners
Amy Stout, Courtney Crummett

Learn how to find and use information more effectively in our hands-on workshops. No advanced registration required. Light refreshments will be served at each session.

**NOTE that different events will be happening throughout the month of April and early May.**

WHERE: 14N-132 (Digital Instruction Resource Center – DIRC)

WHEN: Friday, April 18, 12pm (noon)

Class attendees will learn about the organization of key NCBI databases, understand the database record structure, and work with the BLAST search tool. The session is a hands-on practicum and an excellent starting point for people who are new to, or curious about bioinformatics research tools.

Sponsored by the MIT Libraries.

Contact the Science Library for more information.

NIH Public Access Policy of 2008: New Guide for MIT Authors Available

Posted April 10th, 2008 by Ellen Duranceau

The new NIH Public Access Policy of 2008 requires all NIH-funded investigators to submit their final, peer-reviewed manuscripts to the NIH’s PubMed Central (PMC) database (the digital archive of biomedical and life sciences journal literature) upon acceptance for journal publication.

This policy, created to conform with a new law passed by Congress, applies to all peer-reviewed articles accepted for publication on or after April 7, 2008, if they arise, in whole or in part, from direct costs funded by NIH.

The MIT Libraries have developed a step-by-step guide for MIT authors who need to comply with this policy.   In addition, the MIT Libraries’ Scholarly Publishing & Licensing Consultant is available to assist MIT authors in complying with it.

For more information, please contact copyright-lib@mit.edu.

MIT professor Junot Diaz wins Pulitzer for ‘Oscar Wao’

Posted April 10th, 2008 by mit-admin

 

diaz2.jpg

 

Junot Diaz‘ critically acclaimed first novel “The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao,” has just been awarded the prestigious Pulitzer Prize for fiction. Diaz, a tenured professor at MIT, worked on his novel for eleven years before its publication in September, 2007. Since then it has received glowing reviews from some of the most highly-regarded publications. Michiko Kakutani, writing for the The New York Times Book Review, called the novel “An extraordinarily vibrant book that’s fueled by adrenaline-powered prose.”

More about Mr. Diaz (from the Pulitzer board):

Junot Diaz has had his fiction published in The New Yorker and The Paris Review, and four times in The Best American Short Stories. His critically praised, bestselling debut book, Drown, led to his inclusion among Newsweek’s “New Faces of 1996.” The New Yorker placed him on a list of the twenty top writers of the twenty-first century. Diaz has won the Eugene McDermott Award, the Lila Wallace-Reader’s Digest Writers’ Award, the PEN/Malamud Award, a Guggenheim Fellowship, a Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study Fellowship, a U.S.-Japan Creative Artists Fellowship from the NEA, and most recently the Rome Fellowship from the American Academy of Arts and Letters. Born in Santo Domingo, the Dominican Republic, and raised there and in New Jersey, he graduated from Rutgers and received an MFA from Cornell. He lives in New York City and Boston.

More about ‘The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao” (from the book jacket):

Things have never been easy for Oscar, a sweet but disastrously overweight, lovesick Dominican ghetto nerd. From his home in New Jersey, where he lives with his old-world mother and rebellious sister, Oscar dreams of becoming the Dominican J. R. R. Tolkien and, most of all, of finding love. But he may never get what he wants, thanks to the Fukú-the curse that has haunted Oscar’s family for generations, dooming them to prison, torture, tragic accidents, and, above all, ill-starred love. Oscar, still waiting for his first kiss, is just its most recent victim.

Diaz immerses us in the tumultuous life of Oscar and the history of the family at large, rendering with genuine warmth and dazzling energy, humor, and insight the Dominican-American experience, and, ultimately, the endless human capacity to persevere in the face of heartbreak and loss. A true literary triumph, The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao confirms Junot Diaz as one of the best and most exciting voices of our time.

And from the MIT news office:

http://web.mit.edu/newsoffice/2008/diaz-pulitzer-0407.html

MIT Libraries Puzzle Challenge – Fifth Puzzle Launched!

Posted April 8th, 2008 by Ryan Gray

Puzzle piece

The MIT Libraries have launched the fifth puzzle in a series of puzzles that can be solved using Libraries’ resources. The puzzles will be released over the course of the Spring 2008 semester, appearing in the Tech, on kiosks in Lobby 7, and elsewhere around campus. MIT students can view the puzzle and submit their answers online at http://libraries.mit.edu/puzzle. Correct answers submitted by the deadline will be entered into a drawing for an Apple iPod Nano. The deadline for entries for the fifth puzzle is Monday, April 14, 2008.

Congratulations to Steven Sivek, winner of the fourth puzzle!

SHASS open house & special bookmobile Tues. 4/8 @ noon

Posted April 8th, 2008 by mit-admin

Come to the SHASS Open House, and meet members of the MIT Libraries community who provide support for SHASS. Subject specialists from the Dewey and Humanities Libraries will be on hand to tell you more about our online, and human, resources.

And, our Bookmobile will make special appearance, with a related collection of library materials on display…and to check out!!!

Today @ noon, in the Sala De Puerto Rico, 2nd floor of the Student Center.

Professor Irving Singer Lecture Now Available on MIT World

Posted April 4th, 2008 by Heather Denny

bergman-225.jpgOn Thursday, November 15th the MIT Humanities Library hosted Professor Irving Singer who spoke about his new book, Ingmar Bergman, Cinematic Philosopher, just published by The MIT Press. A video of the event is now available on MIT World.

In this lecture, Singer discusses how Bergman used philosophical ideas “in an extended sense” — not by including philosophical discussions in his films, but through his masterful use of cinematic technique to examine the particularities of human experience. Singer also describes how Bergman wove aspects of his own life’s story into his films, in intense and vivid ways.

Irving Singer is Professor of Philosophy at MIT. He is the author of Reality Transformed: Film as Meaning and Technique, Three Philosophical Filmmakers: Hitchcock, Welles, Renoir (both published by The MIT Press), and many other books.

This event was sponsored by authors@mit. For more information, call call 253-5249, or email authors@mit.edu. See the MIT Press Bookstore’s “Events” page for a list of upcoming events.

New Tool for Industry and Market Research: IBISWorld Reports

Posted April 4th, 2008 by Katherine McNeill

IbisWorld

Industry and market researchers at MIT now have access to IBISWorld Reports (http://libraries.mit.edu/get/ibisworld), a database spanning 700+ U.S. industries. Each IBIS report covers:

  • industry performance and conditions
  • market size
  • demand determinants
  • and other key variables

IBIS is searchable by keyword and is unique in grouping its reports by the NAICS industrial codes at five-digits. Note: while IBIS is among our more comprehensive sources for U.S. industries, Global Industry reports are not part of MIT’s subscription.

Lewis Music Library spring newsletter available

Posted April 3rd, 2008 by Christie Moore

flying envelopeThe spring 2008 issue of What’s the Score? the newsletter of the Lewis Music Library is now available. The web version has been posted online and print copies are on the front counter in the library (Bldg. 14E-109).

Read about library activities, projects, and new subscriptions — and don’t miss the ever-popular bad music jokes!

IAPril 2008: Overview of EndNote, RefWorks and Zotero

Posted April 3rd, 2008 by Ryan Gray

logo_strip22.bmp

Managing your references: Overview of EndNote, RefWorks and Zotero
Remlee Green, Mathew Willmott

Learn how to find and use information more effectively in our hands-on workshops. No advanced registration required. Light refreshments will be served at each session.

**NOTE that different events will be happening throughout the month of April and early May.**

WHERE: 14N-132 (Digital Instruction Resource Center – DIRC)

WHEN: Friday, April 11, 12pm (noon)

Using citation management software to create and maintain a collection of references is becoming more common and important in today’s academic world. This session will focus on EndNote, RefWorks, and Zotero, the three major options for bibliographic software at MIT.

Sponsored by the MIT Libraries.

Contact the Science Library for more information.

New Podcast: Hal Abelson on Supporting Our Intellectual Commons

Posted April 2nd, 2008 by Ellen Duranceau

hal.gifThe latest in the series of podcasts on scholarly publication and copyright is an interview with Hal Abelson, Class of 1922 Professor of Computer Science and Engineering in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT.

Professor Abelson has played key roles in fostering educational technology initiatives such MIT’s OpenCourseWare and DSpace. He has a broad interest in information technology and policy,  and developed and teaches the course “Ethics and Law on the Electronic Frontier.”  He was a founding director of Creative Commons, Public Knowledge, and the Free Software Foundation, organizations that are devoted to strengthening our intellectual commons.

In the podcast, Professor Abelson reflects on the origins and impacts of these efforts, his reasons for remaining committed to more open access to research, and the concerns he has about the future.

Download the audio file. (22:53 minutes; 21 MB)


The other episodes in the podcast series are available on the scholarly publication website.To subscribe to the MIT Libraries’ Podcasts on Scholarly Publishing, paste this link into iTunes or another podcast reader: http://feeds.rapidfeeds.com/6772/

We encourage and welcome your feedback, which you may direct to copyright-lib@mit.edu.

Stock up at the MIT Libraries Booksale, Wednesday, April 30

Posted April 1st, 2008 by Ryan Gray

BooksaleWednesday, April 30, 2008

Time: 10:00a–3:00p

Location: 10-105

Stop by and browse titles in diverse subject areas including Aero/Astro, Art, Architecture, Engineering, Fiction, Math, Management, Music, Physics, & Political Science/Social Science.

Open to the MIT Community only.

Questions? Contact the Gifts Office at gifts-lib@mit.edu or x 3.5693

All proceeds benefit the Libraries’ Preservation Fund.

IAPril Information Workshops 2008

Posted April 1st, 2008 by Ryan Gray

banner_logos2.jpg

Learn how to find and use information more effectively in these hands-on workshops. No advanced registration required. Light refreshments will be served at each session.

WHERE: 14N-132 (Digital Instruction Resource Center – DIRC)

WHEN: Fridays in April (and May), 12pm (noon)

April 11: Managing your references: Overview of EndNote, RefWorks and Zotero
Remlee Green, Mathew Willmott

Using citation management software to create and maintain a collection of references is becoming more common and important in today’s academic world. This session will focus on EndNote, RefWorks, and Zotero, the three major options for bibliographic software at MIT.

April 18: Bioinformatics for Beginners
Amy Stout, Courtney Crummett

Class attendees will learn about the organization of key NCBI databases, understand the database record structure, and work with the BLAST search tool. The session is a hands-on practicum and an excellent starting point for people who are new to, or curious about bioinformatics research tools.

April 25: EndNote Basics
Peter Cohn, Anita Perkins

EndNote is a “personal bibliographic software” package which allows you to create and manage a database of bibliographic references.

May 2: Citation Surfing: Using Databases to Track Article Citations
Michael M Noga

Have your ever used the Web of Science to find citations? Have you used Google Scholar? Perhaps you have used citation links in journal articles. This session will explore the different ways you can use citation searching to identify literature on a subject.

Sponsored by the MIT Libraries.

Contact the Science Library for more information.

Archives’ April exhibit: Letter from Governor John A. Andrew to MIT’s founder, William Barton Rogers, March 9, 1861

Posted April 1st, 2008 by Lois Beattie

Page 1 of Andrew’s letterInterest was high in 1861 as the proposed Institute of Technology moved through the Massachusetts legislative process. But among those opposed was the secretary of the Board of Education. In March, Governor John A. Andrew invited William Barton Rogers to a meeting of the board to persuade them of its advantages for education and industry. “Be thou the advocate,” wrote Massachusetts Governor Andrew in a letter exhibited as the Object of the Month by the Institute Archives and Special Collections. The proposal was finally approved by the Massachusetts legislature, and on April 10, 1861, Governor Andrew signed the Act to Incorporate the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Celebrate MIT’s anniversary month, and the countdown to MIT’s sesquicentennial in 2011, by learning more about the Institute’s beginnings and William Barton Rogers, the extraordinary man whose vision made it happen. Rogers’s papers and many documents concerning MIT’s early years are available for research in the Institute Archives, 14N-118, Monday – Thursday, 10:00 am – 4:00 pm.