Archive for April, 2007

Reminder: Bill Mitchell speaks tonight!!!

Posted April 25th, 2007 by mit-admin
Professor William J. Mitchell and Imaginig MIT

Please join us as Professor William J. Mitchell presents his newest book. Imagining MIT is the image rich story of the decade long, billion-dollar building boom at MIT and how it produced major works of architecture by Charles Correa, Frank Gehry, Steven Holl, Fumihiko Maki, and Kevin Roche.

Professor Mitchell is the Alexander W. Dreyfoos Professor of Architecture and Media Arts and Sciences and directs the Smart Cities research group at MIT’s Media Lab.

Imagining MIT is published by The MIT Press, 2007.
This event is free and wheelchair accessible.

 

Market Research on Mobile Marketing

Posted April 20th, 2007 by Katherine McNeill

Nearly ubiquitous, cell phones offer marketers a personalized platform to reach consumers. It is not surprising that mobile marketing is an area of growing research, data collection, and trend analysis.

In order to provide MIT users with cutting edge research reports in this rapidly-developing field, MIT Libraries recently upgraded their subscription to Jupiter Research, a leading market research firm in media and internet communications. Look for the reports and analyses on mobile marketing and media under the Marketing and Advertising tab on Jupiter’s web site at http://libraries.mit.edu/get/jupiter.

5th annual Prokopoff violin music concert on April 27

Posted April 20th, 2007 by Christie Moore

violinOn Friday, April 27 from noon to 1 pm the Lewis Music Library will host the 5th annual concert of violin music donated from the collection of Stephen Prokopoff. MIT students Vincent Chi-Kwan Cheung P, Albert Chow ’08, Christine Hsueh ’10, Serenus Hua ’07, Sherman Jia G (concert coordinator), Catherine McCurry ’07, Matthew Roitstein ’07, Sunny Wicks ’07, Nina Young ’07, and accompanist Hsin-Bei Lee will perform music by Bach, Poulenc, Schubert, and Spohr.

In 2001, Lois Craig, former Associate Dean of MIT’s School of Architecture and Planning, donated her late husband’s collection of 2,680 violin scores to the library. Most of the scores have been cataloged, bound, and added to the library’s collection and many have already circulated to the large number of violinists and other performers at MIT.

Come enjoy some wonderful music in an attractive setting!

The Lewis Music Library is located in Bldg. 14E-109 and the concert is free and open to the public.

Upcoming IAPril Events!

Posted April 19th, 2007 by Ryan Gray

Learn how to find and use information more effectively in these hands-on workshops.

**NOTE that different events will be happening throughout the month of April. Click here for a complete listing of events.**

Library toolbars, extensions and web apps: little tools with big impact

WHERE: 14N-132 (Digital Instruction Resource Center – DIRC)

WHEN: Wednesday, April 25, 5-6:30pm

Tired of hopping between Google Scholar, Amazon, and library catalogs and databases? Can’t find that great article you meant to read later? Need better ways of sharing scholarly resources within your group?

Come hear about some new web tools that may help you work more efficiently. Learn to organize and share your references, catalog your personal book collections online, and search seamlessly between library resources and other web sites.

We will demo: LibraryThing, del.icio.us, CiteULike, library-relevant Firefox extensions, and more.

Company Research for Engineers and Scientists: Know your Prospective Employer or Partner

WHERE: 14N-132 (Digital Instruction Resource Center – DIRC)

WHEN: Friday, April 27, 12-2pm

You may be a skilled investigator in the area of Science or Engineering, but what do you know about company research? This session will introduce you to library-supported databases about companies and industries. We will also use examples and hands-on exercises to demonstrate strategies for learning about industry trends and prospective employers or partners.

No advanced registration required.

Sponsored by the MIT Libraries.
Contact the Science Library for more information.

Bill Mitchell speaks about his new book IMAGINING MIT!

Posted April 18th, 2007 by mit-admin
Professor William J. Mitchell and Imagining MIT Please join us as Professor William J. Mitchell presents his newest book. Imagining MIT is the image rich story of the decade long, billion-dollar building boom at MIT and how it produced major works of architecture by Charles Correa, Frank Gehry, Steven Holl, Fumihiko Maki, and Kevin Roche.

Professor Mitchell is the Alexander W. Dreyfoos Professor of Architecture and Media Arts and Sciences and directs the Smart Cities research group at MIT’s Media Lab.

Imagining MIT is published by The MIT Press, 2007.
This event is free and wheelchair accessible.

More pick of the week CDs

Posted April 13th, 2007 by Christie Moore

Here are some of the CDs that have been received in the Lewis Music Library during the past week. So far the library has received 82 CDs month in the month of April.

Click on a cover image to see its Barton library catalog record:

gloryland

Anonymous 4 (Musical group). Gloryland.
PhonCD An785 glo

 

cheer

American Brass Quintet. Brass Band. Cheer, boys, cheer!: music of the 26th N.C. regimental band, CSA. Volume 2.
PhonCD Am353 che

dido

Convivium Musicum. Dido’s lament: and other music by Franco-Flemish composers, c. 1500-1600.
1410600 precat

eton

The Eton choirbook collection.
PhonCD Et65 cho v.1-5
 

hacker

Hacker, Alan. A portrait of Alan Hacker.
PhonCD H115 por
 

jordan

Jordan, Joe. From barrelhouse to Broadway: the musical odyssey of Joe Jordan.
PhonCD J P2123 jord

mock

Mock Mozart.
1403266 precat

eichendorff

Schumann, Robert. Eichendorff-Lieder.
PhonCD Sch86 lie39

zummo

Zummo, Peter. Zummo with an X.
PhonCD Z848 sel

The library is offering a longer loan period over Patriots’ Day weekend; CDs and DVDs borrowed through Sunday, April 12-15 will be due Wednesday, 4/18/07 (by closing, 10pm). Limit of 5, no renewals. The Lewis Music Library is located in Bldg. 14E-109 and library hours are posted on the web.

NCBI Bioinformatics Mini-Courses: May 10-11

Posted April 13th, 2007 by Remlee Green

NCBI logo

The MIT Libraries will sponsor a series of 4 NCBI bioinformatics mini-courses on May 10-11, 2007 in the Hayden Library DIRC, 14N-132. Each course is 2.5 hours in length, including a lecture followed by a 1-hour hands-on session. To register, send your name, name of course(s), department, affiliation, and email address to Louisa Worthington Rogers. There is a limit of 20 attendees per course. (UPDATE: Classes are full, and no additional sign-ups will be accepted at this time.)

Thursday, May 10:

9:30-12:00 – Making Sense of DNA and Protein Sequences
In this mini-course, we will find a gene within a eukaryotic DNA sequence. We will then predict the function of the implied protein product by seeking sequence similarities to proteins of documented function using BLAST and other tools. Finally, we will find a 3D modeling template for this protein sequence using a Conserved Domain Database Search.

1:00-3:30 – Entrez Gene Quick Start
In this course, we will use NCBI ‘s Entrez Gene to learn how to obtain information about a human gene such as its mRNA and genomic sequence, gene structure (exon-intron locations), function and phenotypes associated with mutations. We will also learn how to determine whether the SNPs in the coding region of a gene are known to alter the function of the protein product.

Friday, May 11:

9:30-12:00 – Structural Analysis Quick Start
This course covers how to visualize and annotate 3D protein structures using NCBI’s Cn3D, identify conserved domain(s) present in a protein, seach for other proteins containing similar domain(s), explore a 3D modeling template for the query protein and find distant sequence homologs that may not be identified by BLAST.

1:00-3:30 – Mapviewer Quick Start
In this course, we will use the human genome Map Viewer. Used to view the NCBI assembly of the complete human genome, Map Viewer is a valuable tool for the identification and localization of genes that contribute to human disease. In this course, we will see how to view different human genome maps and make best use of them. We will learn to locate a human gene, download its sequence along with its upstream sequence (to analyze promoter regions), obtain exon-intron coordinates, find a possible splice variant and identify whether the variations in the gene are associated with a disease.

About the Instructors:

Simin Assadi and Steve Pechous are biologists on the User Services staff of the National Center for Biotechnology Information.

NOTE: CLASSES ARE FULL!

April is National Poetry Month – publish your poem on the Humanities Library Blog!

Posted April 12th, 2007 by mit-admin
“happily leave enough disdain there”

“uptight versatile whispers are sublime”

“we cry above our anatomy”

Those are a few of the odd thoughts and profound notions currently gracing our Reading Room. Think you can do better? Make us a poem with our poetry magnets on the PN1998 stack end in the Humanities Reading Room (14S-200) and we’ll publish selections on this news blog!

Upcoming IAPril Events!

Posted April 12th, 2007 by Ryan Gray

Learn how to find and use information more effectively in these hands-on workshops.

**NOTE that different events will be happening throughout the month of April. Click here for a complete listing of events.**

Flavors of Citation Searching

WHERE: 14N-132 (Digital Instruction Resource Center – DIRC)

WHEN: Wednesday, April 18, 5-6pm

Have you ever used Web of Science to find citations? Have you used Google Scholar? Ever used citation links in journal articles? This session will explore the different ways you can use the citation searching method for identifying literature on a subject to benefit of your research. The concept of citation searching has been around for over 50 years, but it has evolved with technology. Several examples will be given, and we would enjoy hearing about your own techniques.

Copyright and Scholarly Publication: Retaining Rights & Increasing the Impact of Research

WHERE: 14N-132 (Digital Instruction Resource Center – DIRC)

WHEN: Friday, April 20, 12-2pm

Can you use and re-use your own work for future writing and teaching? Or is it locked tight behind a vault of copyright restrictions? This session will help you find the keys to fully realize the potential of your own work for yourself and the world. It will provide a very brief summary of copyright law and how it affects your work, and an overview of actions you can take to improve the impact and reach of your research – including why retaining rights to your work matters, and how you can take advantage such rights to increase citation and readership.

No advanced registration required.

Sponsored by the MIT Libraries.
Contact the Science Library for more information.

Longer CD/DVD loan over Patriots’ Day weekend

Posted April 12th, 2007 by Christie Moore

revereThe Lewis Music Library is offering a special loan period for CDs and DVDs over Patriots’ Day weekend. Music compact discs and DVDs borrowed Thursday-Sunday, April 12-15 will be due Wednesday, 4/18/07 (by closing, 10pm). Limit of 5, no renewals.

This special offer coincides with Thursday’s Bookmobile which will be from 11am-2pm in the Stata Center.

The Lewis Music Library is located in Bldg. 14E-109 and library hours are posted on the web.

Lewis Music Library spring newsletter available

Posted April 10th, 2007 by Christie Moore

line-note

The spring 2007 issue of the MIT Lewis Music Library newsletter, “What’s the Score?” is now available. The web version has been posted online and print copies are on the front counter in the library (Bldg. 14E-109).

Read about library activities and projects, new subscriptions, and of course the usual really, really bad music jokes.

line-note

Bookmobile! Just in time for Patriots’ Day!

Posted April 9th, 2007 by Ryan Gray

The Humanities Library will hold its next Bookmobile on Thursday, April 12, from 11-2 at the Information Intersection in the Stata Center.

Choose from books, DVDs, audiobooks and music for Patriots’ Day weekend.

Come check us out!

Innovation Expert Eric von Hippel Walks the Walk — Offering His Books Open Access

Posted April 9th, 2007 by Ellen Duranceau

Eric von Hippel is T Wilson Professor of Management at the MIT Sloan School of Management and Professor of Engineering Systems at MIT. He specializes in research related to the nature and economics of distributed and open innovation. Recently he spoke with Ellen Finnie Duranceau, Scholarly Publishing and Licensing Consultant in the MIT Libraries, about his own innovation in publishing. He made two of his books available openly on his website at no cost to the reader: Democratizing Innovation, published in 2005 by the MIT Press, and Sources of Innovation, published in 1988 by Oxford University Press.

democratizing innovation cover

Sources of Innovation

Libraries: What motivated you to make your books openly available, and to what extent was your motivation a direct result of the subject of your research?

EVH: My whole purpose – doing all of my research – is not to get money from book royalties. That’s not my goal. I’m trying to diffuse my work and ideas, much the way MIT does with OpenCourseWare. Society is already paying me for my work via my research funding.

Libraries: So your motivation to make the book openly available was not so much directly related to your work in open innovation?

EVH: Only in the sense that I probably knew more about how to make a free downloading option work because of my research – I knew about Creative Commons licensing, for example, while many people are not aware of that option.Libraries: What was involved in making the arrangements with the two publishers?

EVH: For Sources of Innovation, Oxford University Press made a special deal with me. I approached them about 15 years after my book was initially published. Oxford agreed I could post the book for downloading, but they required that I make some compensation to them for any significant decline in sales. If the sales remained stable, we’d be even. I did not end up having to pay them any money.

In the case of Democratizing Innovation, I worked with MIT Press from the start to be sure I would have the right to offer my book on my website. In that case, I kept copyright to the book, and gave MIT Press the right to publish the printed version. This is why I was able to post the book under the CreativeCommons license.

Libraries: What has the impact been, both in terms of downloads from the site, and on sales of hard copies of the books?

EVH: There have been 12,700 downloads of Sources of Innovation since I put it on the web last year, running about 20 per day. Sales before posting in 2005 (the book was published in 1988) were about 325 per year. In the year after posting, they were about 575.

Democratizing Innovation has been downloaded 55,000 times so far, with downloads from my MIT website running about 50 per day. I don’t think this has hurt hard copy sales – and it actually may have helped. MIT Press told me that hardcopy sales are higher than their pre-pub estimate of what they would have been without the option of free downloads.

Libraries: So by your estimates, sales of Sources of Innovation went up well over 70% after you made the book openly downloadable, and you believe at least some of the sales of Democratizing Innovation were the result of the open access version. It would seem these numbers would please MIT Press and Oxford University Press. What have the publishers’ reactions been?

EVH: It’s counterintuitive for publishers that they will sell more books if copies can be downloaded for free. So Oxford thought the result was really great. I’m not sure they’ve altered their business model based on the results, but they were pleased. In the case of MIT Press, my book was their first real experiment with this model. Because sales were higher than otherwise expected, they have begun to experiment with offering this option to other authors.

Libraries: The MIT Press confirms that the experiment was very successful. Here’s what Ellen Faran, Director of MIT Press, shared with me about your book: “In order to establish a benchmark for the experiment, we projected the number of copies we would expect to sell in the traditional paid environment during the first year of publication: 3,000 copies, and let me assure you, in our world that’s a big number representing a successful book. The results [in the first] 10 months after publication: excellent reviews and publicity attention, hardcover sales of over 4,800 copies, and more than 31,000 visitors to the web sites where downloads are available. The reception for this book dramatically exceeded our initial expectations.”

Ellen Faran also points out that “we will never know if, without the free PDF, we might have sold 7-8,000 copies” but that “the experiment shows indisputably that, for this one title, open text and paid print may happily co-exist.”

So MIT Press’ expectations have been exceeded. What have your colleagues and readers’ reactions been?

EVH: The colleagues and readers I have heard from thank me. They appreciate having free access. But I think for many people the physical book is still very important. And some people have told me that they liked the book so much after downloading it, they felt they owed it to me to buy a copy, so they did. Others just liked the book so much, they wanted a bound copy.

I have found that my readers appreciate that I not only talk the talk, but walk the walk with respect to encouraging the growth of the information commons. That’s really important to me.

Libraries: What do you think keeps authors from trying what you’ve tried?

EVH: Most authors don’t know that this is possible. They don’t have a model in mind for how they might offer their book openly this way. And for young authors, they are not willing to fight with publishers to make this kind of arrangement – they are so eager to be published.

Libraries: You make some of your working papers available on your web site and in MIT’s research repository, DSpace. Have you made systematic efforts to post articles you’ve authored?

EVH: I’d like to put more of my papers on my website and in DSpace, but I haven’t gotten around to it lately. Thanks for the gentle suggestion :) .

Libraries: Democratizing Innovation is dedicated to “all who are building the information commons.” Do you have any closing words of wisdom for those who are hoping to support this vision here at MIT?

EVH: There is good reason to think that information placed in the information commons enhances both social and private welfare. Specifically in the case of academia, studies indicate that freely-downloadable academic papers get significantly increased diffusion and citations, other things being equal.

*****
If you have questions about this story, or about retaining rights to make your work openly available, please contact copyright-lib@mit.edu.

Download Eric von Hippel’s books from his web page.
Borrow Democratizing Innovation from the MIT Libraries.
Borrow Sources of Innovation from the MIT Libraries.
Review purchase options for Democratizing Innovation.
Review purchase options for Sources of Innovation.

Upcoming IAPril Events!

Posted April 6th, 2007 by Ryan Gray

Learn how to find and use information more effectively in these hands-on workshops.

**NOTE that different events will be happening throughout the month of April. Click here for a complete listing of events.**

EndNote Basics

WHERE: 14N-132 (Digital Instruction Resource Center – DIRC)

WHEN: Wednesday, April 11, 5-6pm

EndNote is a “personal bibliographic software” package which allows you to create and manage a database of bibliographic references. Your database can be used to automatically generate in-text citations and bibliographies in your manuscripts. It can also help you organize and manage your PDF files. This session will be a hands-on practicum. Attendees will create a personal database of cited literature by importing references from resources such as Barton, Web of Science, PubMed and other sources of published literature. You will learn how to search and manipulate databases, and to generate a manuscript and bibliography.

Patent Searching Fundamentals

WHERE: 14N-132 (Digital Instruction Resource Center – DIRC)

WHEN: Friday, April 13, 12-2pm

While you won’t come out of this session qualified to be a patent attorney, you will be able to successfully find patent references from all over the world and know how to obtain patent text and diagrams. The session will be a hands-on practicum which will help de-mystify the patent literature and expose attendees to key resources for finding patent literature. Using patent literature is important for understanding competitive technologies and keeping abreast of current product innovations.

No advanced registration required.

Sponsored by the MIT Libraries.
Contact the Science Library for more information.

Managing Copyright to Advance Research and Teaching: Videotape Now Available

Posted April 6th, 2007 by Ellen Duranceau

iap panel full

The Libraries’ IAP panel on authors’ rights and access to research is now available as a videotape for free viewing over the internet. The panel examines how MIT authors can take actions that will increase the impact of their own work, and serve the advancement of science and technology by maximizing the full potential of research to be shared and reused.

The speakers (in order pictured) include:

Ann Wolpert : Director, MIT Libraries
Thinh Nguyen: Science Commons Counsel
Brian Evans: EAPS Professor of Geophysics
Ellen Duranceau: MIT Libraries Scholarly Publishing and Licensing Consultant
Ann Hammersla: MIT Intellectual Property Counsel
Claude Canizares: Associate Provost

Summary Adapted From MIT World:

ann wolpert iap Ann Wolpert’s panel should set off alarm bells among academics who imagine they may enter blithely into a publishing agreement in the digital age.
claude canizares iap Claude Canizares sets the stage, describing the transformative changes in academic publishing: the disappearance of a paper-driven industry (with limited and controlled copies of authors’ works) and the emergence of internet publishing, “where anything goes.” The inexorable consolidation of academic publishers has allowed “relatively small numbers to exert significant control.” This leads to conflict with institutions like MIT, whose mission is research and the untrammeled dissemination of knowledge. Canizares himself has been subject to copyright agreements that limit his ability to use his own work. “We’d like to make it much easier for authors,” says Canizares.
thinh nguyen iap The archives of Britain’s Royal Society going back 350 years are available online today, says Thinh Nguyen, “but the catch is, you have to be a current subscriber to download” this content. Newton’s article on the invention of the telescope costs $9. “This is the essence of the current model: a gated community of information.” Nguyen’s Science Commons enterprise attempts to reduce legal barriers to scientific research. For instance, he hopes to allow internet users to conduct software searches of online journals—currently prohibited by many publishers. Nguyen encourages scientists who publish to consider alternatives to signing over copyright to publishers without first attempting to negotiate the terms of ownership.
<img src=”http://news-libraries.mit.edu/blog/wp-images/thumb-annhammerslaiap.jpg” hspace=”10″ width=”200″ height=”133″ alt=”ann hammersla iap” / In her job as intellectual property overseer for MIT, Ann Hammersla works to retain as many rights for authors as she can. She’s engaged in the challenging job of working out arrangements with publishers that enable authors to use their own materials in future work, in their classrooms, and to publish on the internet after first publishing in print. She sees an increasing demand by private and government funders for public posting of authors’ works, a demand that runs directly counter to the copyright agreements publishers insist on.
ellen fd iap The best way forward for individual scientific authors, declares Ellen Finnie Duranceau, is through “collective and institutional action.” Together, authors must demand in their publisher agreements the right to “share work as widely as possible,” which will increase their readership and citation rate; and the right to reuse their work flexibly, and to authorize others to use their work. Duranceau discusses “chilling stories,” including an MIT faculty member who gave a publisher copyright to his own hand-drawn maps, and then could not use them on his MIT OpenCourseWare site. Duranceau recommends an MIT amendment to copyright transfer agreements that entitles authors more access to their own work, and more access by others through public repositories.
brian evans iap Brian Evans sees an imbalance, where researchers and universities “are being preyed on by large companies.” Researchers lose rights to their own work, and libraries pay excessively for journals: Says Evans, for “every $10 thousand we pay to a publishing company, it’s $10 thousand we can’t do something else with at the Institute.” He exhorts his colleagues “to consider publishing in public access journals or starting one in your own field,” and to reduce copyright restrictions through individual negotiations. Most of all, faculty should come together to work toward uniform standards.

The video service is provided by MIT World, MIT’s free and open site, which provides on-demand video of significant public events at MIT. The videotape is about one hour and forty minutes in length, but a viewer can select specific tracks, identified and described at the site.

If you have any questions about the panel or the topics it addresses, please contact copyright-lib@mit.edu
or see The Libraries’ Scholarly Publishing Website

Next pick of the week CDs from Lewis Music Library

Posted April 4th, 2007 by Christie Moore

Here are some of the CDs received this week in the Lewis Music Library. The library receives about 175 CDs each month.

Click on a cover image to see its Barton library catalog record:

spagna

Atrium Musicae. La Spagna [a tune through three centuries].
PhonCD At75 spa

glazunov

Glazunov, Aleksandr Konstantinovich. The King of the Jews.
PhonCD G469 tsar

hirosawa

Hirosawa, Asami. Music of the Couperins.
PhonCD H615 musco

kirkby

Kirkby, Emma. Classical Kirkby: Orpheus and Corinna, 17th century English songs on classical themes.
PhonCD K634 cla

lehrer

Lehrer, Tom. The remains of Tom Lehrer.
PhonCD P L529 rem v.1-3 & booklet

latin

Musici de Montréal. Latin impressions.
PhonCD M97348 la
 

winter
Philharmonisches Bläserquintett Berlin. Winter songs.
PhonCD P536 win

piazzolla

Piazzolla, Astor. Astor Piazzolla: el tango.
PhonCD P578 sel ar a
 

strauss

Strauss, Richard. Concerto in D major for oboe and small orchestra; Sonatina no. 2 in E flat major for 16 wind instruments.
PhonCD Str82.7 coob

Music CDs circulate for 3 days (limit of 5, no renewals). The Lewis Music Library is located in Bldg. 14E-109 and library hours are posted on the web.

ISI Covers More Emerging Markets: Now Includes Iran

Posted April 4th, 2007 by Katherine McNeill

ISI Emerging Markets , a database of news, company, and financial data from emerging markets, periodically adds more countries to its coverage. Now they’ve added Iran.

Take a look at information on Iran or numerous other countries from Latin America; Central, Eastern, and Southeast Europe; Asia (including Central Asia); and Africa and the Middle East.

Access ISI Emerging Markets via Vera or its shortcut URL: http://libraries.mit.edu/get/emerg-mkts.

More AIAA technical meeting papers now online!

Posted April 2nd, 2007 by Remlee Green

AIAA logo

The MIT Libraries are pleased to announce the addition of another eight years of online access to American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) technical meeting papers. You can now access these papers online from 1988 to the present.

The Aeronautics and Astronautics Library (33-111) also has copies of all AIAA technical meeting papers, from 1963-date. Most of the older papers are available in paper with those from 1986-1987 available only on microfiche.

MIT’s first building is subject of Archives’ April exhibit

Posted April 1st, 2007 by Lois Beattie
Rogers Building, 1866-1938 To celebrate the 146th anniversary of the founding of MIT (April 10, 1861), the Institute Archives and Special Collections showcases The Rogers Building, Boston, 1866-1938 — MIT’s First Building — as its April Object of the Month. The exhibit includes photographs of the inside of the building as well as links to related exhibits about MIT’s years as “Boston Tech.”

Learn more about MIT at the Institute Archives and Special Collections (14N-118) — The Source for MIT History.