Archive for March, 2007

More pick of the week CDs

Posted March 30th, 2007 by Christie Moore

Here are a few of the CDs that have just been received in the Lewis Music Library. Click on a cover image to see its Barton library catalog record. The library received over 150 CDs in March 2007.

joyful

Derek Trucks Band. Joyful noise.
PhonCD F G3701.B5.D475

 

piano

Jazz piano from the famous Savoy jazz archives. (3 discs)
1401137 precat

trumpet

Jazz trumpet from the famous Savoy jazz archives. (3 discs)
1401138 precat

lalit

Lalit Rao. Raga Darbari Kanhada; Raga Desh.
PhonCD F G7650.L357

luciano

Luciano. Child of a King.
PhonCD P L963 chi

underdogs

Music for the underdogs of the orchestra.
PhonCD V465 cotu

pacifica

Pacifica Quartet. Declarations: music between the wars.
PhonCD P119 dec

ruehr

Ruehr, Elena. Toussaint before the spirits. [Boston Modern Orchestra Project]
PhonCD R8373 tou

rylander

Rylander, Henrik. Traditional arrangements of feedback.
1401279 precat

Music CDs circulate for 3 days (limit of 5, no renewals). The Lewis Music Library is located in Bldg. 14E-109 and library hours are posted on the web.

Book reading and discussion at Humanities Library

Posted March 29th, 2007 by mit-admin

Hansjörg Schertenleib, Writer-in-Residence at MIT, author of numerous novels, poetry, film scripts, drama, and radio plays, will be reading from his latest novel from 2005, Der Glückliche (The Happy One).

Born in 1957 in Zurich Switzerland, Schertenleib’s works have been translated into seven languages. He was trained as a typesetter and a graphic designer, and educated at the School of Arts in Zurich. He was co-editor of the literary magazine Orte from 1980 to 1984. He has lived in Vienna and London, and currently lives in County Donegal in Ireland.

The reading and discussion will be in German and English. Light refreshments will be served.

  • When: Tuesday April 3, 2007
    5-7pm
  • Where: MIT Humanities Library
  • Cost: FREE!!!
  • Presented by: MIT Foreign Language and Literatures, The Max-Kade Foundation New York, S.H.A.R.E., and CB/BS
  • See the record in Barton

Upcoming IAPril Events!

Posted March 29th, 2007 by Ryan Gray

Learn how to find and use information more effectively in these hands-on workshops.

**NOTE that different events will be happening throughout the month of April. Click here for a complete listing of events.**

RefWorks Basics

WHERE: 14N-132 (Digital Instruction Resource Center – DIRC)

WHEN: Wednesday, April 4, 5-6pm

RefWorks is a web-based resource designed to help you to organize references and create a bibliography. RefWorks allows you to search, retrieve relevant citations, and build your bibliography. It allows users to create individual or group accounts, and makes it easy to write papers, or post your results to web pages.

This session will be a hands-on practicum. Attendees will create a personal web account and create a database of cited literature by importing references from resources such as Barton, Web of Science, PubMed and other sources of published literature. You will learn how to organize your references, and to generate manuscripts and bibliographies.

Bioinformatics for Beginners

WHERE: 14N-132 (Digital Instruction Resource Center – DIRC)

WHEN: Friday, April 6, 12-2pm

This class is a basic introduction to NCBI bioinformatics resources. It covers the available databases, details of sequence records, and basic BLAST searching.

No advanced registration required.

Sponsored by the MIT Libraries.
Contact the Science Library for more information.

More market research!

Posted March 28th, 2007 by Katherine McNeill


The MIT Libraries have upgraded our subscription to eMarketer, a database of market research and trend analysis on Internet, e-business, online and mobile marketing, media and emerging technologies. In addition to eMarketer’s compilation of statistics and data on Internet use and markets, MIT users now can access its archive of over 70 market research reports and new titles to be added each month. This resource will be especially useful for people interested in mobile and interactive marketing, trends in Internet and media use, and e-business development.

Access eMarketer via Vera or its shortcut URL: http://libraries.mit.edu/get/estat .

So many books; so little time! – Booksale April 3rd, Bush Room

Posted March 27th, 2007 by Ryan Gray

The next MIT Libraries booksale is coming up!

Stop by and browse titles in Art, Architecture, Chemistry, Earth Science, Engineering, Fiction, History, Linguistics, Music, Urban Studies and much, much more! You’ll find everything from cookbooks to DVDs to atlases.

WHEN: Tuesday, April 3rd, 10-3

WHERE: Bush Room 10-105

Questions? Contact the Gifts Office at gifts-lib@mit.edu or x 3.5693

All proceeds benefit the Libraries’ Preservation Fund.

IAPril Information Workshops 2007

Posted March 27th, 2007 by Ryan Gray

Learn how to find and use information more effectively in these hands-on workshops.

WHERE: 14N-132 (Digital Instruction Resource Center – DIRC)

WHEN: Every Wednesday in April at 5, and every Friday in April at 12pm (noon). Light refreshments will be served.

Wednesday, April 4, 5-6pm, RefWorks Basics

RefWorks is a web-based resource designed to help you to organize references and create a bibliography. RefWorks allows you to search, retrieve relevant citations, and build your bibliography. It allows users to create individual or group accounts, and makes it easy to write papers, or post your results to web pages.

This session will be a hands-on practicum. Attendees will create a personal web account and create a database of cited literature by importing references from resources such as Barton, Web of Science, PubMed and other sources of published literature. You will learn how to organize your references, and to generate manuscripts and bibliographies.

Friday, April 6, 12-2pm, Bioinformatics for Beginners

This class is a basic introduction to NCBI bioinformatics resources. It covers the available databases, details of sequence records, and basic BLAST searching.

Wednesday, April 11, 5-6pm, EndNote Basics

EndNote is a “personal bibliographic software” package which allows you to create and manage a database of bibliographic references. Your database can be used to automatically generate in-text citations and bibliographies in your manuscripts. It can also help you organize and manage your PDF files. This session will be a hands-on practicum. Attendees will create a personal database of cited literature by importing references from resources such as Barton, Web of Science, PubMed and other sources of published literature. You will learn how to search and manipulate databases, and to generate a manuscript and bibliography.

Friday, April 13, 12-1pm: Patent Searching Fundamentals

While you won’t come out of this session qualified to be a patent attorney, you will be able to successfully find patent references from all over the world and know how to obtain patent text and diagrams. The session will be a hands-on practicum which will help de-mystify the patent literature and expose attendees to key resources for finding patent literature. Using patent literature is important for understanding competitive technologies and keeping abreast of current product innovations.

Wednesday, April 18, 5-6pm: Flavors of Citation Searching

Have you ever used Web of Science to find citations? Have you used Google Scholar? Ever used citation links in journal articles? This session will explore the different ways you can use the citation searching method for identifying literature on a subject to benefit of your research. The concept of citation searching has been around for over 50 years, but it has evolved with technology. Several examples will be given, and we would enjoy hearing about your own techniques.

Friday, April 20, 12-1pm: Copyright and Scholarly Publication: Retaining Rights & Increasing the Impact of Research

Can you use and re-use your own work for future writing and teaching? Or is it locked tight behind a vault of copyright restrictions? This session will help you find the keys to fully realize the potential of your own work for yourself and the world. It will provide a very brief summary of copyright law and how it affects your work, and an overview of actions you can take to improve the impact and reach of your research – including why retaining rights to your work matters, and how you can take advantage such rights to increase citation and readership.

Wednesday, April 25, 5-6:30pm: Library toolbars, extensions and web apps: little tools with big impact

Tired of hopping between Google Scholar, Amazon, and library catalogs and databases? Can’t find that great article you meant to read later? Need better ways of sharing scholarly resources within your group?

Come hear about some new web tools that may help you work more efficiently. Learn to organize and share your references, catalog your personal book collections online, and search seamlessly between library resources and other web sites.

We will demo: LibraryThing, del.icio.us, CiteULike, library-relevant Firefox extensions, and more.

Friday, April 27, 12-1pm: Company Research for Engineers and Scientists: Know your Prospective Employer or Partner

You may be a skilled investigator in the area of Science or Engineering, but what do you know about company research? This session will introduce you to library-supported databases about companies and industries. We will also use examples and hands-on exercises to demonstrate strategies for learning about industry trends and prospective employers or partners.

No advanced registration required.

Sponsored by the MIT Libraries.
Contact the Science Library for more information.

Naxos jazz online music now available

Posted March 26th, 2007 by Christie Moore

naxosjazzThe Lewis Music Library now has a subscription to Naxos Music Library Jazz, one of the most comprehensive collections of jazz music available online. It has approximately 20,000 tracks of jazz from over 1,900 albums, representing over 500 jazz artists. Naxos Music Library Jazz comprises Naxos Jazz and the 22 labels of Fantasy Jazz.

Bookmarkable URL: http://libraries.mit.edu/get/naxosjazz (MIT certificates required; 6 simultaneous users).

New pick of the week CDs

Posted March 23rd, 2007 by Christie Moore

Here is a sample selection of CDs that have just been received in the Lewis Music Library. Click on a cover image to see its Barton library catalog record. The library has approximately 14,000 CDs, so come in and check out a few!

cherubini

Cherubini, Luigi. Requiem. With Beethoven, Elegiac song op.118. [Boston Baroque, Pearlman]
PhonCD C424 req

handel

Handel, George Frideric. Le cantate per il Cardinal Pamphili: Roma, 1706-1707. [Invernizzi, La Risonanza, Bonizzoni]
PhonCD H191 ca a

henze

Henze, Hans Werner. Orpheus behind the wire [Rundfunkchor Berlin, Gritton]; Aristaeus [Wuttke, Rundfunk-Sinfonieorchester Berlin, Janowski].
PhonCD H399 orp

slackkey

Legends of Hawaiian slack key guitar: live from Maui. [Kahumoku, Ho, et al.]
PhonCD F G4380.L44

zodiac

Mary Lou Williams Collective. Zodiac suite–revisited.
PhonCD J W674 zodre

minstrelsy

Monarchs of minstrelsy: historic recordings by the stars of the minstrel stage. [Recorded between 1902 and 1954]
PhonCD F G3700.M666

reich

Reich, Steve. Phases: a Nonesuch retrospective. [Recorded 1984-2005]
PhonCD R270.8 sel c v.1-5 & booklet

werner

Werner, Kenny. Lawn chair society. [With Douglas, Potter, Picket, Colley, Blade]
1401929 precat

ziporyn

Ziporyn, Evan. Frog’s eye. [Ziporyn, Boston Modern Orchestra Project, et al.]
PhonCD Z679 sel

   

Music CDs ordinarily circulate for 3 days (limit of 5, no renewals); however, this year there is a special longer loan period beginning March 22nd and extending through spring break. The Lewis Music Library is located in Bldg. 14E-109 and library hours are posted on the web.

Books ‘n’ salsa Today (Thursday March 22nd) at the MIT Humanities Library Bookmobile!

Posted March 22nd, 2007 by mit-admin

Bookmobile Salsa Image

Spice up your day with the hot hot moves of the MIT Salsa Club! Then, while your hips are still shaking, cha cha cha over to the ninth wonder of the world, the mysterious and magical Bookmobile, and check out a cd or a book or two (or three, or four). Now, here’s the kicker (so to speak): you can also enter our raffle for 1 FREE dance lesson for 2 from Salsa maestro Chris Zabo!

Los Details:

  • When: Thursday March 22nd (Today!!!)
    10:30am – 2pm
    (dancing starts at 11)
  • Where: Lobby 10
  • Cost: FREE!!!

Using Data: Responsible Use and Restricted Data

Posted March 21st, 2007 by Katherine McNeill

Want to be sure you’re using data responsibly? Concerned about issues of confidentiality of survey respondents? Have you ever come across a data set that says it’s “restricted access?” The Libraries’ Social Science Data Services has two new web resources to help you:

Responsible Use: Outlines good practices for using data, including maintaining respondent confidentiality and citing data sources.

Restricted Data: Describes the process at MIT for getting access to data sets and variables that data archives restrict for reasons of confidentiality.

New Database: Historical Statistics of the United States

Posted March 21st, 2007 by Katherine McNeill

Interested in researching U.S. history? A new tool is at your disposal: the online edition of the Historical Statistics of the United States.

This recently updated compendium source for American history covers the earliest times to present. It includes over 37,000 data series from over 1,000 sources, covering topics such as:

  • population work and welfare
  • economic structure and performance
  • governance and international relations

Tables may be viewed in PDF or HTML format and downloaded in Excel or .csv.

Access it via Vera or its shortcut URL: http://libraries.mit.edu/get/hsus.

Retaining Rights & Increasing the Impact of Your Research: Information for MIT authors

Posted March 16th, 2007 by Ellen Duranceau

In response to faculty requests, this new, concise overview of information about retaining rights when publishing is now available on the MIT Libraries’ scholarly publishing website:

Why retain rights?

• Many publishers create significant barriers for authors who want to reuse or share their work, and for access to that work by others. Negotiating changes to standard publisher agreements can help authors avoid these obstacles, thus increasing options for authors as well as readership, citation, and impact of the work itself. (Openly available articles have been shown to be more heavily cited.)
• Publishers routinely change the agreements they ask authors to sign. If you have not secured rights you want as an author, the publisher may alter its practices over time.
• Making research and scholarship as widely available as possible supports MIT’s mission of “generating, disseminating, and preserving knowledge, and to working with others to bring this knowledge to bear on the world’s great challenges.”
• Some research funders request or require that work created with their funds be made available openly on the web. Their policies can be reviewed at the Juliet site. Other institutions also have open access policies or mandates.

Which rights to retain?

• MIT authors are often most interested in retaining rights to:

  • Reuse their work in teaching, future publications, and in all scholarly and professional activities.
  • Post their work on the web (sometimes referred to as “self-archiving”), e.g. in Dspace, MIT’s research repository; in a discipline archive (such as PubMed Central or arXiv); or on a web page.

How to retain rights?

• Authors should specify the rights they want to retain, as most publishers do not extend these rights to authors in their standard agreements.
• One simple way to retain rights is to use the MIT Copyright Amendment Form.
• This form enables authors to continue using their publications in their academic work; to deposit them into DSpace; and to deposit them into any discipline-based research repository (including PubMed Central, the National Library of Medicine’s database for NIH-funded manuscripts).

Which publishers are likely to be flexible about these rights?

• Publisher policies and agreements vary considerably. The Romeo database offers a convenient summary of many publisher copyright and self-archiving policies.
• Publisher policies and agreements are usually linked from the author information or article submission section of a journal’s website.
• Publisher policies change over time, and the terms stated on their websites often vary from the terms of their actual agreements, so it is important to read the agreement itself.

Where do I go with questions about these issues?

Please contact copyright-lib@mit.edu or visit the MIT Libraries scholarly publishing website

MIT Faculty and Libraries Refuse DRM; SAE Digital Library Canceled

Posted March 16th, 2007 by Ellen Duranceau

The MIT Libraries have canceled access to the Society of Automotive Engineers’ web-based database of technical papers, rejecting the SAE’s requirement that MIT accept the imposition of Digital Rights Management (DRM) technology.

SAE’s DRM technology severely limits use of SAE papers and imposes unnecessary burdens on readers. With this technology, users must download a DRM plugin, FileOpen Systems’ third-party plug-in for Adobe Reader called “FileOpen,” in order to read SAE papers. This plugin limits use to on-screen viewing and making a single printed copy, and does not work on Linux or Unix platforms.

Latest SAE self-help guide for how to locate and how to request SAE documents.

MIT faculty respond

“It’s a step backwards,” says Professor Wai Cheng, SAE fellow and Professor of Mechanical Engineering at MIT, who feels strongly enough about the implications of DRM that he has asked to be added to the agenda of the upcoming SAE Publication Board meeting in April, when he will address this topic.

In addition to Professor Cheng, the MIT Libraries consulted with other faculty members who publish or use SAE content. The responses were uniformly against accepting DRM, even if it meant losing ready access to SAE papers. When informed that the SAE feels the need to impose DRM to protect their intellectual property, Professor John Heywood, the Director of MIT’s Sloan Automotive Lab, who publishes his own work with the SAE, responded with a question: “Their intellectual property?” He commented that increasingly strict and limiting restrictions on use of papers that are offered to publishers for free is causing faculty to become less willing to “give it all away” when they publish.

Echoing Professor Heywood, Alan Epstein, Professor of Aeronautics and Astronautics, believes that “If SAE limits exposure to their material and makes it difficult for people to get it, faculty will choose to publish elsewhere.” He noted that “SAE is a not-for-profit organization and should be in this for the long term,” rather than imposing high prices and heavy restrictions to maximize short-term profit.

Reducing access to research

At a time when technology makes it possible to share research more quickly and broadly than ever before, and when innovative automotive research is a matter of global concern, SAE is limiting access to the research that has been entrusted to the society. In addition to imposing DRM on access to the papers for paid subscribers, the SAE also prevents information about its papers from being found through any channel other than the ones they control.

What does this mean? In contrast to information about research published by other engineering societies, which can be found in databases such as Google, ISI’s Web of Science, or the Compendex engineering database, information about SAE papers is only made available through SAE’s proprietary database. Such policies severely limit access to information about SAE papers, and are out of step with market norms.

New arrangements for access to SAE content at MIT

While MIT faculty, the MIT Libraries, and MIT’s Office of Information Services & Technology all agree that SAE’s imposition of DRM is unacceptable in our environment, the Libraries nevertheless recognize that it is important to provide some level of ongoing access to SAE papers needed by the MIT community. The Libraries are therefore working on a new access arrangement.

Beginning in April, 2007, the Libraries will make available either a printed or web-based index of SAE papers; once a citation is identified in this index, the paper will be accessible through one of three channels, depending on its publication date:

• SAE papers published prior to 2004 will be available either in print or on microfiche in the Barker Engineering Library.
• SAE papers published in 2004, 2005, or 2006 will be available either in print or on CD-ROM in the Barker Engineering Library.
• SAE papers from the current year will be made available on request through a web form.

The Libraries are working to ensure that this system will be in place in time to avoid major disruption to MIT users when the SAE Digital Library access ends March 31. We regret that CD-ROM and on-demand access will not be as convenient for the MIT community as the full-text, web-based access has been.

Before taking this step, the Libraries spent several months weighing options, consulting with faculty and IS&T experts, and in conversation with the SAE. When the SAE informed the Libraries that they remain unwilling to accept any access to the Digital Library other than through the DRM plugin, the Libraries reluctantly chose this alternative path.

We welcome and encourage your feedback

We are interested in your views about this situation, particularly given its manifestation of some of the complex issues currently facing publishers, academic authors, users of digital content, and the libraries that serve them. Please address comments or questions to copyright-lib@mit.edu.

Please note: a correction was made to this story 3/22/07 to clarify the ownership of the DRM plug-in, based on information received from Adobe.

Next pick of the week CDs

Posted March 16th, 2007 by Christie Moore

Here is another selection of CDs that have just arrived in the Lewis Music Library. Come to the library or visit the Humanities and Music bookmobile on Thursday, March 22 in Lobby 10!

Music CDs ordinarily circulate for 3 days (limit of 5, no renewals); however, this year there will be a special longer loan period beginning March 22nd and extending through spring break. The Lewis Music Library is located in Bldg. 14E-109 and library hours are posted on the web.

Books ‘n’ salsa at the MIT Humanities Library Bookmobile!

Posted March 15th, 2007 by mit-admin

Bookmobile Salsa Image

Spice up your day with the hot hot moves of the MIT Salsa Club! Then, while your hips are still shaking, cha cha cha over to the ninth wonder of the world, the mysterious and magical Bookmobile, and check out a cd or a book or two (or three, or four). Now, here’s the kicker (so to speak): you can also enter our raffle for 1 FREE dance lesson for 2 from Salsa maestro Chris Zabo!

Los Details:

  • When: Thursday March 22nd
    10:30am – 2pm
    (dancing starts at 11)
  • Where: Lobby 10
  • Cost: FREE!!!

Longer CD/DVD loan over spring break

Posted March 13th, 2007 by Christie Moore

crocusThe Lewis Music Library is offering a special longer loan period for CDs and DVDs over spring break 2007. Music compact discs and DVDs borrowed Thursday, March 22 through Friday, March 30 will be due Monday, April 2 (by closing, 10pm). That’s more than a week, instead of the usual 3 days! Limit of 5, no renewals.

This longer loan period coincides with the Humanities & Music bookmobile on March 22 from 10:30am-2pm in Lobby 10. Special note: the MIT Salsa Club has agreed to come and dance! The library’s new salsa CDs and other Latin American CDs will be brought to the bookmobile.

The Lewis Music Library is located in Bldg. 14E-109 and library hours are posted on the web.

Pick of the week: more new CDs in the Lewis Music Library

Posted March 9th, 2007 by Christie Moore

This week’s new CD arrivals include the last two salsa discs (see previous blog):

Music CDs circulate for 3 days (limit of 5, no renewals). The Lewis Music Library is located in Bldg. 14E-109 and library hours are posted on the web.

ASTM standards online & new Standards On-Demand program

Posted March 7th, 2007 by Stephanie Hartman

ASTM Standards available online!

    Standards

    The MIT Libraries is very pleased to announce online access to the complete set of current ASTM Standards and Specifications. This access will be provided through the vendor, Techstreet, which is part of the Thomson group. This purchasing decision was made in part due to the responses received from the Standards Survey conducted last spring. ASTM standards received the highest use across departments, and we are confident this online access will better assist you in your teaching, research and learning. ASTM Standards can be found via Vera (http://libraries.mit.edu/vera) or via the shortcut URL: http://libraries.mit.edu/get/astmstand.

    Get any standard you need: Standards On-Demand

    Another improvement in service was also inspired by the research and data collection last spring and summer. This fall we began our “Standards On-Demand” program. Due to rising prices in standards packages, we felt it best to take our limited resources and move to an “on-demand” model. In this model, the MIT Libraries will consider and, in most cases, purchase any standard needed by the MIT community. Be sure to check the Libraries Standards page (URL below) to learn about what standards we already have access to. If you don’t find what you need, fill out the request form found on the page or at the URL below and we will do our best to get the standard for you.

    Important URLs:
    ASTM Standards via Techstreet/Thomson: http://libraries.mit.edu/get/astmstand
    Libraries guide to Standards: http://libraries.mit.edu/guides/types/standards/
    Request a standard: http://libraries.mit.edu/standards-form

    Please let us know if you have any comments or questions about any of these services, and in the meantime, enjoy!

Pick of the week CDs from Lewis Music Library

Posted March 2nd, 2007 by Christie Moore

Here are some great new CDs that just arrived in the Lewis Music Library this week:

Music CDs circulate for 3 days (limit of 5, no renewals). The Lewis Music Library is located in Bldg. 14E-109 and library hours are posted on the web.

Working with US Census Data in a GIS – 3/2/2007

Posted March 1st, 2007 by Lisa Sweeney

When: Friday, March 2, 2-4 pm
Where: MIT GIS Lab

The US Census holds an enormous amount of demographic information gathered over a long period of time. New and interesting relationships can often times be observed when looking at census data on a map. Come learn about what’s in the US Census, and the tools available at MIT for mapping it including: Geolytics, Pcensus, and the new Census Tool built into the MIT Geodata Repository for ArcGIS. More information available on the GIS workshops webpage

Single Households and Transit Choice in Boston

First issue of VooDoo is subject of Archives’ March exhibit

Posted March 1st, 2007 by Lois Beattie

VooDoo cats graphic

For March the Institute Archives and Special Collections has chosen “VooDoo, vol. 1, no. 1 (March, 1919): Student Humor at MIT” for its Object of the Month exhibit. Learn more about VooDoo and its mascot, Phosphorus the cat.

The Object of the Month is also displayed in an exhibit case across from the Archives, Room 14N-118.