Scholarly Communication

OA research in the news: A breakthrough in endometriosis research

Posted February 26th, 2014 by Katharine Dunn
Linda Griffith

Linda Griffith

Over the years Linda Griffith has undergone many surgeries for endometriosis, a condition in which tissue that normally grows in the uterus is found elsewhere in the body and can cause lesions, inflammation, and infertility. The disease is poorly understood, and so it made sense to Griffith, a professor of biological and mechanical engineering, to start researching it. In a paper published earlier this month, Griffith and colleagues, including bioengineering professor Douglas Lauffenburger, studied pelvic fluid from women with endometriosis and in about a third they found elevated levels of a group of immune system proteins. The work is an early step towards classifying the disease and, eventually, finding new treatments for it. “We’re not claiming we found a mechanism — the mechanism for endometriosis,” Griffith told the Boston Globe. “We have found a very convincing approach to understand an immune network.”

Explore Professor Griffith’s research in the Open Access Articles collection in DSpace@MIT, where it is openly accessible to the world.

Since the MIT faculty established their Open Access Policy in March 2009 they have made thousands of research papers freely available to the world via DSpace@MIT. To highlight that research, we’re offering a series of blog posts that link news stories about scholars’ work to their open access papers in DSpace.

OA research in the news: MIT names new provost and chancellor

Posted February 12th, 2014 by Katharine Dunn
Martin Schmidt and Cynthia Barnhart Photos: Dominick Reuter

Martin Schmidt and Cynthia Barnhart
Photos: Dominick Reuter

Two MIT faculty members have been named provost and chancellor, the Institute’s two most senior academic posts. Martin Schmidt, the new provost, is an electrical engineering professor and had been associate provost since 2008. The provost is the senior academic and budget officer on campus. Cynthia Barnhart, a professor in civil and environmental engineering, has been associate dean of the School of Engineering since 2007. In Barnhart’s job as chancellor she’s responsible for undergraduate and graduate education and student life.

Explore Professor Schmidt’s research and Professor Barnhart’s research in the Open Access Articles collection in DSpace@MIT, where it is openly accessible to the world.

Since the MIT faculty established their Open Access Policy in March 2009 they have made thousands of research papers freely available to the world via DSpace@MIT. To highlight that research, we’re offering a series of blog posts that link news stories about scholars’ work to their open access papers in DSpace.

Libraries release new guide to independent book publishing

Posted February 6th, 2014 by Katharine Dunn

Independent (or self) publishing has exploded in the last few years: The number of independently published titles grew by 422% between 2007 and 2012. A large part of that growth is because in some ways it’s quite easy to publish a compilation of lecture notes, monograph, book of essays, textbook, or novel—there are now dozens of companies that can help authors sell to a potentially large audience or simply print a copy of their book. But which company, if any, is right for a given project?

The MIT Libraries’ Office of Scholarly Publishing, Copyright, and Licensing has created a guide to independent publishing as a resource for authors navigating the services and companies out there. We released the guide last month during the IAP session “An Introduction to Independent Publishing” cosponsored by Urban Studies & Planning Professor Anne Whiston Spirn. Spirn, who independently published her latest book, The Eye is a Door, led the well-attended session and shared her own experience and advice. We hope to run it again next year.

The guide gives an overview of what independent publishing is and why you might decide to do it, and suggests questions to ask before choosing a company or service, e.g., do you want to edit or design your book or pay someone to do this work? Do you hope to make money from sales? Do you want to publish an e-book, print book, or both? The guide also highlights some of today’s most popular publishing companies and the services they offer.

 

OA research in the news: Rewriting fearful memories

Posted January 30th, 2014 by Katharine Dunn
Photo by Len Rubenstein

Photo by Len Rubenstein

Sufferers of post-traumatic stress disorder sometimes undergo a treatment in which they re-experience a fearful memory in a safe place, with the hope that their brains will rewrite the memory so it no longer triggers them. But this therapy doesn’t always work and its effects may not last, especially if the memory is years old. MIT neuroscientists, including Picower Institute for Learning and Memory director Li-Huei Tsai, have shown they can lessen traumatic memories in mice when pairing the behavioral therapy with a dose of a drug that that makes the brain more malleable. “Our experiments really strongly argue that either the old memories are permanently being modified, or a new much more potent memory is formed that completely overwrites the old memory,” Tsai told the MIT News.

Explore Professor Tsai’s research in the Open Access Articles collection in DSpace@MIT, where it is openly accessible to the world.

Since the MIT faculty established their Open Access Policy in March 2009 they have made thousands of research papers freely available to the world via DSpace@MIT. To highlight that research, we’re offering a series of blog posts that link news stories about scholars’ work to their open access papers in DSpace.

IAP prize opportunity for students!

Posted January 23rd, 2014 by Katharine Dunn

There are still spots open for the Libraries’ “Fair Use & Images: Quiz Tool Beta Test” IAP session on January 30th at 12 pm, room 14N-132. If you’re one of the first 10 undergraduate or graduate students to register, you get a $20 Amazon gift certificate just for coming and giving us feedback on the quiz. During the session we’ll also draw names for two $50 Amazon gift certificates.

The quiz is intended to shed light on aspects of copyright, including how to determine whether a use of an online image is “fair” under US copyright law, as well as related legal issues about using images on your website, blog, or in social media.

To sign up, contact Ellen Duranceau, 14S-216, 617 253-8483, EFINNIE@MIT.EDU

OA research in the news: Medicaid increases visits to the ER

Posted January 21st, 2014 by Katharine Dunn

A study coauthored by MIT economics professor Amy Finkelstein shows that newly health-insured adults are more likely to visit emergency rooms than their uninsured peers. The study, published earlier this month, used data from a 2008 Medicaid expansion program in Oregon and found that the newly insured visited ERs about 40 percent more often. Researchers looked at emergency department records over an 18-month period for about 25,000 low-income adults, some of whom were randomly selected in a lottery to receive Medicaid.

Millions of Americans are now eligible for Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act, and analysts have suggested that expanded coverage could reduce visits to urgent care—and thus overall healthcare costs—by giving more people cheaper access to primary care physicians and preventive care. This study opens the door to further work. “We should not view [use of] the emergency room as a failure of our health-care system,” economist Amitabh Chandra told the MIT News. “The big unanswered question is, ‘Which effect is causing them to go to the emergency room?’”

Explore Professor Finkelstein’s research in the Open Access Articles collection in DSpace@MIT, where it is openly accessible to the world.

Since the MIT faculty established their Open Access Policy in March 2009 they have made thousands of research papers freely available to the world via DSpace@MIT. To highlight that research, we’re offering a series of blog posts that link news stories about scholars’ work to their open access papers in DSpace.

OA research in the news: Kastner to be nominated to DOE

Posted December 11th, 2013 by Katharine Dunn
Marc Kastner

Marc Kastner

Last month, President Obama announced his intent to nominate Marc Kastner, dean of MIT’s School of Science, to head the Department of Energy’s Office of Science. The office is the largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States; its 2013 budget is $4.9 billion. Kastner, who works in condensed matter physics, has led the School of Science since 2007. “A brilliant physicist and highly effective manager, Marc Kastner is ideally suited to manage DOE’s basic science portfolio and its network of national labs,” said MIT President Rafael Reif. “He argues eloquently for the value of basic science but has worked with equal enthusiasm to help MIT faculty transform emerging ideas into important real-world technologies. He knows the challenges of building a sustainable energy future, and I can think of no one better to help the U.S. seize the opportunities, as well.”

Explore Professor Kastner’s research in the Open Access Articles collection in DSpace@MIT, where it is openly accessible to the world.

Since the MIT faculty established their Open Access Policy in March 2009 they have made thousands of research papers freely available to the world via DSpace@MIT. To highlight that research, we’re offering a series of blog posts that link news stories about scholars’ work to their open access papers in DSpace.

OA research in the news: Hard math for grade schoolers

Posted November 25th, 2013 by Katharine Dunn

Hard math for elementary schoolAfter a couple of years of coaching his daughter’s middle-school math team, MIT economist Glenn Ellison compiled his notes into a self-published book, Hard Math for Middle School. The book was intended for members of the math league his daughter participated in, but in the five years since it was published it has sold thousands of copies nationwide. Now (at the urging of his youngest daughter), Ellison has released a second book for third- to sixth-graders looking for a challenge beyond what they learn in the classroom. The goal is to keep math interesting for advanced students. “What would be great is if in 10 to 12 years my MIT students come up to me and say ‘I used your book when I was in fifth grade,’” says Ellison. “That would be really awesome.”

Ellison’s research has previously been inspired by his daughters: In 2010 he published a paper exploring the gender gap at high school math competitions.

Explore Professor Ellison’s research in the Open Access Articles collection in DSpace@MIT, where it is openly accessible to the world.

Since the MIT faculty established their Open Access Policy in March 2009 they have made thousands of research papers freely available to the world via DSpace@MIT. To highlight that research, we’re offering a series of blog posts that link news stories about scholars’ work to their open access papers in DSpace.

OA research in the news: New way to monitor induced-coma patients

Posted November 14th, 2013 by Katharine Dunn
Emery N. Brown

Emery N. Brown

Brain injury patients are sometimes deliberately placed in a coma with anesthesia drugs to allow swelling to go down and their brains to heal. Comas can last for days, during which patients’ brain activity must be regularly monitored to ensure the right level of sedation. The constant checking is “totally inefficient,” says Emery Brown, an anesthesiologist at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and a professor in MIT’s Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences. Brown and his colleagues at MGH have developed a “brain-machine interface” that automatically monitors brain activity and adjusts drug dosages accordingly. They’ve tested the system on rats and are now planning human trials.

Explore Professor Brown’s research in the Open Access Articles collection in DSpace@MIT, where it is openly accessible to the world.

Since the MIT faculty established their Open Access Policy in March 2009 they have made thousands of research papers freely available to the world via DSpace@MIT. To highlight that research, we’re offering a series of blog posts that link news stories about scholars’ work to their open access papers in DSpace.

Libraries continue financial support for MIT authors’ open access publishing — though PLoS closes discount program

Posted November 12th, 2013 by Ellen Duranceau

The MIT Libraries have been supporting MIT authors who wish to make their work as openly available as possible, by funding programs and memberships that reduce publication fees for those who choose open access publishing options.

Through the MIT Libraries, MIT authors receive discounts in the following open access publications:

    MIT Libraries Open Access Publication Fund — Provides MIT faculty with up to $1000 towards publication fees in peer-reviewed, open access journals, including memberships in the new PeerJ. more info

    arXiv –Through funding from the MIT Libraries and the Department of Physics, MIT is an institutional supporting member of this repository, which offers open access to e-prints in Physics, Mathematics, Computer Science, Quantitative Biology, Quantitative Finance and Statistics. more info

    BioMed Central –MIT Libraries’ membership provides MIT authors with a 15% discount on article processing fees for BMC journals and all SpringerOpen journals as well. more info

    Nucleic Acids Research — MIT Libraries’ membership provides MIT authors with a 50% discount on open access processing fees. more info

    PNAS (Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences) — MIT Libraries’ site license provides MIT authors with a 25% discount on the optional open access processing fees. more info

    Royal Society — MIT Libraries’ membership provides MIT authors with a 25% discount on article processing charges for any Royal Society journal, including their open access journal and their open access option for traditional journals called EXiS Open Choice. more info

    Royal Society of Chemistry – MIT Libraries’ site license provides MIT authors with a 15% discount on the optional open access processing fees. more info / and see: Special information on vouchers covering entire open access publishing fees for limited number of articles in 2013

The Libraries had also been subscribing to a membership in PLoS (Public Library of Science), which has been providing MIT authors with a 10% discount on author fees.   PLoS has decided to retire this membership program, which was intended to be a transitional part of their business model, at the end of 2013.

More information:

Libraries’ web page on Open Access publication support

Ellen Finnie Duranceau, Program Manager, Scholarly Publishing, Copyright, and Licensing, MIT Libraries

New frontiers in open access publishing video released — speakers praise transparent peer review

Posted November 4th, 2013 by Ellen Duranceau

During International Open Access Week, the MIT Faculty Open Access Working Group and the MIT Libraries co-sponsored a panel discussion about new models of open access publishing, which is now available through TechTV. A central theme was the merits of moving not just to open access publishing — thus allowing readers access without payment — but making what is arguably a more radical shift, to open peer review.

Tibor Tscheke

Tibor Tscheke

Tibor Tscheke, of the soon-to-be-launched publishing platform ScienceOpen.com
Tscheke, CFO and CTO of ScienceOpen.com, an open access publishing platform, commented that the “concept of journals will go away” in the not-too-distant future, given that there is no longer the need for this kind of “container.” Publishing will move from being a product to being a service. One of the “most culturally interesting changes,” Tscheke believes, will be the break with walled peer review, which will be transformed into “public post-publication peer review.” This new model will improve upon problems with existing peer review, including delays in publication, closed commentary, and binary decision making about the value of an article.

In response to questions about how the system would work without the editorial role that points to works ‘objectively,’ Tscheke questioned in turn whether a closed-door process that selects peer reviewers is in fact “objective.” With increased numbers of reviewers, including one’s direct peers around the world, the process would be improved.

Jacqueline Thai

Jacqueline Thai

Jacqueline Thai, of the new open access journal PeerJ
Thai, Head of Publishing Operations at PeerJ, picked up immediately on the theme of open, signed peer review, indicating that PeerJ has this option. While some questioned whether people would be willing to engage in open peer review, Thai reported that 73% of their authors are choosing to share their review history openly, and that 40% of their reviewers sign their reviews. (Reviewers are given incentives by PeerJ to sign the reviews).

Asked about the recent “sting,” in which a large percentage of open access journals that were sent a fake paper published it, Thai responded that the incident reflected problems with peer review that are inherent in how journals are run, not problems specific to open access journals.

Tscheke concurred, indicating that the way to avoid such problems is to open up peer review publicly so that a fake submission is not worthwhile, presumably because it would quickly be seen as a fake when the review process is cast open so widely.

Marguerite Avery, of MIT Press and the Berkman Center for Internet and Society
Avery is Senior Acquisitions Editor at The MIT Press. From her perspective in book publishing, she provided a foil for the two article-focused speakers, noting for example that open peer review and relying on the “wisdom of the crowd,” is unlikely to work when the object to be reviewed is a 500-page manuscript. She also questioned whether the “hidden labor” involved in time-consuming peer review has been fully addressed by the open models, and what would happen to work that was never reviewed.

Marguerite Avery

Marguerite Avery

Tscheke responded that such a lack of reviews may mean the work is simply not interesting enough. And ultimately, he said, “there is no perfect system — but there is more perfection in transparency than in hidden processes.”

The video, including the full panel discussion, is available under a Creative Commons Attribution license, and may be freely reused, adapted, and shared.

Ellen Finnie Duranceau / Program Manager, Scholarly Publishing, Copyright, and Licensing.

OA research in the news: Nanoparticles attack aggressive tumors

Posted October 31st, 2013 by Katharine Dunn
Schematic drawing of a new nanoparticle developed at MIT. Graphic courtesy of the researchers.

Schematic drawing of a new nanoparticle developed at MIT. Graphic courtesy of the researchers.

MIT chemical engineers have developed a new treatment for an aggressive form of breast cancer whose tumors resist chemotherapy drugs. Led by David H. Koch Professor in Engineering Paula Hammond, the team designed nanoparticles that pack a one-two punch: They deliver a cancer drug along with short strands of RNA that shut off genes used by cancer cells to escape the drug. The nanoparticles are also coated with an outer layer that protects them from degrading while en route to the cancer cells. The researchers used the particles to successfully shrink breast tumors in mice, as they report in a recent issue of the journal ACS Nano. The lead author on the paper is Jason Deng, a postdoc in Hammond’s lab.

Explore Professor Hammond’s research in the Open Access Articles collection in DSpace@MIT, where it is openly accessible to the world.

Since the MIT faculty established their Open Access Policy in March 2009 they have made thousands of research papers freely available to the world via DSpace@MIT. To highlight that research, we’re offering a series of blog posts that link news stories about scholars’ work to their open access papers in DSpace.

MIT students engage with open access at Libraries event

Posted October 29th, 2013 by Katharine Dunn
Katharine Dunn and Mark Clemente field questions at an information table during Open Access week

Katharine Dunn and Mark Clemente field questions at an information table during Open Access Week

Last Wednesday, more than 30 MIT students and researchers stopped by the Office of Scholarly Publishing & Licensing table in Lobby 10 set up to celebrate international Open Access Week. About two-thirds of the people who came by to chat were undergraduate students who hadn’t previously heard of open access or DSpace@MIT, the digital repository that houses scholarly articles, theses, and other MIT content. Most were curious and happy to learn that through the MIT Faculty Open Access Policy researchers are making their scholarly articles freely available online. Issues that particularly resonated with students were the fact that increasing journal subscription prices are shutting out large numbers of readers around the world and that open access is way to democratize scientific research.

The information table was a new experiment for the Libraries. Students who attempted a quiz question on open access, DSpace@MIT, or author rights won a prize: an MIT Libraries t-shirt, a PLOS t-shirt, or the book Open Access by Peter Suber, a leader of the open access movement. The shirts were popular and disappeared quickly. Other giveaways included pens, magnets, and Halloween candy. Given the interest and enthusiasm, the Libraries hope to make this an annual event.

 

Praise for MIT open access articles

Posted October 24th, 2013 by Katharine Dunn

open dome logo black on white 2

More reasons celebrate International Open Access Week, October 21–25

The thank-you note arrived with language echoing the voices of many other readers of MIT Open Access Articles: “I thought I would show my appreciation for the open access that MIT affords. Many projects and papers require access to cutting-edge studies and articles. Many of these are unfortunately stuck behind paywalls. Having access to these types of information has helped me succeed.”

But the author of the note may not be who you’d expect: it was a graduate student at an American university. Reader comments sent to the MIT Libraries make clear that while many beneficiaries of the MIT Faculty Open Access Policy come from developing nations, where institutions and individuals can afford fewer resources, a growing number come from the United States, where even well-funded colleges and universities are increasingly forced to limit access to journals in order to make ends meet. Scholarly journals can cost more than $10,000 a year and subscription prices continue to rise, leading to cancellations and reduced access.

US students, even those associated with a university, therefore have much to gain from open access. As one astrophysics student recently wrote: “While doing preliminary research, I stumbled upon one of your articles. The articles not only provided me insight, but also directed my further searches, leading me on different paths than I had considered, and considerably expediting the process.”

Another student commented that “Thanks to MIT Open Access, I was able to read a high-quality document on a subject in which there has been very little research. I discovered that I’m not alone in my research interests, however esoteric some of [them] may seem. I found a very insightful article that took me to a new level of inspiration.”

For those not associated with a university, the need for access is particularly pressing. In the last six months alone, MIT heard from artists, engineers, independent researchers, and authors who all made similar comments: They felt excluded from scholarly research because of article costs, and the articles they found and read in DSpace@MIT gave them the opportunity to, as they wrote, “catch up on new ideas,” “open my mind beyond the talking points of the day,” or “find further research.”

Readers also gain personally, including one individual who used a DSpace@MIT article as a resource for medical information. He wrote that he began to think about bone elasticity as being implicated in a fracture he had recently sustained: “The article assisted me in understanding the role of collagen in bone growth and renewal and, in turn, led me to further research into dietary modifications that I can implement.”

The need for access expressed by these US-based readers has not been lost on the Obama administration or the US Congress. In mid-February, members of Congress introduced a bill that would require a dozen US government agencies—including the Department of Education, the Department of Energy, and NASA—to make articles that result from research they fund publicly available on the Internet. A week later, the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy issued a directive to an even larger group of federal agencies requiring that they devise plans to develop open access policies. Those plans were due in August and are now under review. Both the bill and the directive build on the successful public access policy adopted by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in 2008.

Meanwhile, right here at MIT, the voices of grateful readers—whether in the US or beyond—reflect and consummate the faculty’s commitment to “disseminating the fruits of [their] research as widely as possible.” As one reader wrote: “It is wonderful to have the chance to go straight to the source and learn something about how knowledge is produced at the best places.”

(a version of article originally appeared in the MIT News)

Downloads of MIT faculty open access articles top 1.3 million

Posted October 23rd, 2013 by Ellen Duranceau

Articles in the Open Access Articles Collection in DSpace@MIT have been downloaded more than 1,380,000 times since the collection was created in October 2009 to house articles under the MIT Faculty Open Access Policy.
oa downloads by month through sept. 2013

Monthly downloads have reached a new peak of over 73,000 in September 2013, an increase of 72% over last year’s total from the same month.

This information is being shared in celebration of International Open Access Week.

Ellen Finnie Duranceau / Program Manager, Scholarly Publishing & Licensing / MIT Libraries

Global reach: The Open Access Articles Collection at 4

Posted October 22nd, 2013 by Ellen Duranceau

This month, the Open Access Articles Collection, created to house articles made available under the MIT Faculty Open Access Policy, turns four. In those four years, downloads have grown past the 1.3 million mark, and have been documented from every corner of the globe.

In the last few months, Greenland joined the chorus of downloads from around the world (with 4 downloads), as did the Holy See (Vatican City State), Montserrat, and Somalia (1 download each).

Worldwide downloads from Open Access Articles Collection, 2009- September 2013

Worldwide downloads from Open Access Articles Collection, October 2009- September 2013

Downloads are heaviest from the United States (33%), China (9%), India (6%), the United Kingdom (5%), and Germany (4%). Not surprisingly, Canada (3%) and Australia (2%) are also heavy users of the collection, along with Japan, South Korea, and France. Use is very widespread, with substantial downloads from countries as diverse geographically as Chile, Indonesia, Mexico, Finland, Saudi Arabia, and Kenya (which accounts for 1% of the downloads). Hong Kong and Vietnam account for 0.7% and 0.6% of the downloads, respectively, with Bhutan comprising .002%, at 20 downloads.

Readers around the world have spoken with their actions, supporting the premise of the faculty’s open access policy, which is designed to share MIT research and scholarship as widely as possible.

This news is reported in celebration of International Open Access Week.

Ellen Finnie Duranceau / Program Manager, Scholarly Publishing & Licensing / MIT Libraries

MIT Faculty share 10,000 articles freely — with an appreciative world

Posted October 21st, 2013 by Ellen Duranceau

In the four years since the MIT Faculty adopted their Open Access Policy, the collection housing their open access articles has shown steady growth, and recently topped 10,000 papers.

oa articles items per month through september 2013

These papers are not simply stored and counted, however. They are read by grateful readers from all around the world. The stories are as varied as they are moving and compelling: the fifth grader acquiring a new insight about planet composition; the high school debater preparing for a competition; the faculty member in the Baltic trying to get quality information to students; the business person working on clean energy; the reader in India frustrated by paywalls. While each story is unique, in other ways each person tells the same tale — each is a productive reader of MIT research who would otherwise have done without, to the detriment of us all.

oa quotes fifth grade and clean energy business

oa quotes high school debater and india paywalls

This information is being shared in celebration of International Open Access Week.

Ellen Finnie Duranceau / Program Manager, Scholarly Publishing & Licensing / MIT Libraries

OA research in the news: Changes to auditing may help reduce pollution

Posted October 15th, 2013 by Katharine Dunn
Michael Greenstone

Michael Greenstone

Economists at MIT have co-authored a study that underscores a troubling aspect of the auditing industry, in which auditors, because they’re paid by the companies they scrutinize, have an incentive to not deliver bad reviews. The study looked at about 500 industrial plants in a western Indian state and found that when auditors were randomly assigned to plants and paid from central funds, their results were very different. For example, auditors in the study found that nearly 60% of the plants were violating India’s particulates emissions laws; previous audits had cited only 7%. The state is now using this information to help enforce pollution laws.

“There is a fundamental conflict of interest in the way auditing markets are set up around the world,” said Professor Michael Greenstone, an author on the paper with his colleague Esther Duflo. “The ultimate hope with the experiment was definitely to see pollution at the firm level drop,” said Duflo.

Esther Duflo

Esther Duflo

Explore Professor Greenstone’s research and Professor Duflo’s research in the Open Access Articles collection in DSpace@MIT, where it is openly accessible to the world.

Since the MIT faculty established their Open Access Policy in March 2009 they have made thousands of research papers freely available to the world via DSpace@MIT. To highlight that research, we’re offering a series of blog posts that link news stories about scholars’ work to their open access papers in DSpace.

10,000th paper deposited under MIT Faculty Open Access Policy

Posted October 7th, 2013 by Ellen Duranceau

This month, the 10,000th paper was added to the Open Access Articles Collection, which houses papers collected under the MIT Faculty Open Access Policy. This important milestone comes as the collection marks its fourth birthday. The collection was created in October 2009, in the wake of the faculty’s adoption of their policy, which makes their scholarly articles openly available on the web.

Sara Seager

Sara Seager

The 10,000th paper was authored by Sara Seager, who just received a MacArthur Fellowship for her work on planets outside our solar system. Her paper “Infrared transmission spectroscopy of the exoplanets HD 209458b and XO-1b using the wide field camera-3 on the hubble space telescope” can be accessed in DSpace@MIT, along with others she has written. Professor Seager comments that “it’s great that MIT is fostering open access of the MIT community’s work.”

And in fact, since the inception of the Policy in March 2009, 37% of the MIT faculty’s articles have been made openly accessible in the Open Access Articles Collection. We reported on a previous milestone, the one millionth download from the Collection, in May.

This news is reported in celebration of International Open Access Week, which begins later in October.

More information:

Ellen Finnie Duranceau, Program Manager, Scholarly Publishing & Licensing

MIT Faculty Open Access Policy FAQ

Deposit a paper under the Faculty Open Access Policy

 

Panel discussion on “New Frontiers in Open Access Publishing” Tuesday, October 22

Posted October 3rd, 2013 by Ellen Duranceau

The MIT Faculty Open Access Working Group and the MIT Libraries are cosponsoring a panel discussion of “New Frontiers in Open Access Publishing.”

The session will be held on Tuesday October 22, from 3-4:30 in E25-111.

Speakers will include:

Jacqueline Thai

Jacqueline Thai

Jacqueline Thai, of the new open access journal PeerJ
Thai is Head of Publishing Operations at PeerJ, an open access, peer-reviewed, scholarly journal in the Biological and Medical Sciences. It offers a unique business model: low-cost lifetime memberships that allow authors (if their papers are accepted) to publish once, twice, or unlimited times per year, depending on the membership level.

Tibor Tscheke

Tibor Tscheke

Tibor Tscheke, of the soon-to-be-launched publishing platform ScienceOpen.com
Tscheke is CFO and CTO of ScienceOpen.com, an open access publishing platform to support researchers in networking, accessing, organizing, and publishing their work. Founded by individuals with decades of experience in traditional scholarly publishing, ScienceOpen’s aim is to “combine the goal of open science with social networking and crowd sourcing tools to create knowledge out of a sea of information.”

Marguerite Avery, of MIT Press and the Berkman Center for Internet and Society
Avery is Senior Acquisitions Editor at The MIT Press. As a Fellow at the Berkman Center, Avery is focused on seeking out solutions for scholarly publishing to accommodate the changing needs of scholars, including publishing models for open access.

Marguerite Avery

Marguerite Avery

This panel is being presented in celebration of International Open Access Week, and is intended to provide a forum for discussion of new open access models of scholarly publishing and how they can serve authors and readers. We anticipate a lively and informative conversation.

Refreshments will be served.

If you have questions about this event, contact Ellen Finnie Duranceau, Program Manager, Scholarly Publishing & Licensing, MIT Libraries