Scholarly Communication

New web page summarizes major US research funder open access requirements

Posted October 17th, 2014 by Ellen Duranceau

As part of an effort to provide information about new open access requirements that are emerging from the White House Directive on “Expanding Public Access to the Results of Federally Funded Research,” the MIT Libraries will be tracking each agency’s requirements on a new web page.

screen shot research funder table

The requirements of the Department of Energy, the first agency to release its Public Access Plan, are included, as are other existing policies, such as the NIH Public Access Policy, as well as the NSF’s existing policy on data management plans.

doe logo

US federal agencies with more than $100 Million annually in R&D will be issuing their open access requirements in coming months, and those policies will be summarized on this web page as details become available.

If you have questions about open access requirements:

  • For publications, contact Ellen Finnie Duranceau, Program Manager, Scholarly Publishing, Copyright, and Licensing, MIT Libraries
  • For data, contact datamanagement@mit.edu.

  • This news is being shared in celebration of International Open Access Week.

    An Open Access Week event: Chemistry societies and open access — new options for authors

    Posted October 17th, 2014 by Ellen Duranceau
    OA speakers

    Pictured above, L to R from top: Professor Christopher Cummins; Jennifer Griffiths, RSC; Mary Yess, ECS; Kevin Davies, ACS

    In honor of International Open Access Week, the MIT Libraries are sponsoring a panel discussion on October 24 which will give authors an opportunity to hear directly from three chemistry societies about their new open access publishing options, and future plans.

    Please join us for this panel:

    Date: October 24, 2014
    Time: 12:00-1:00
    Location: Room 2-105
    Refreshments: a light lunch will be available at 11:45.

    Each of these societies has recently expanded their open access programs, and has announced new ways for authors to make their journal articles openly accessible.

    The panel will be moderated by Steve Gass, Interim Director of Libraries, and will include:

    • Professor of Chemistry Christopher Cummins, who will offer his perspective as an MIT author and Associate Editor for the journal Chemical Science (published by the Royal Society of Chemistry).
    • American Chemical Society: Kevin Davies, VP of business development.
    • Electrochemical Society: Mary Yess, Deputy Executive Director/Chief Content Officer & Publisher.
    • Royal Society of Chemistry: Jennifer Griffiths, Editorial Development Manager for North America.

    Short remarks from each speaker will be followed by a discussion.

    Ellen Finnie Duranceau, Program Manager, Scholarly Publishing, Copyright, and Licensing, MIT Libraries

    OA research in the news: Autism as a disorder of prediction

    Posted October 15th, 2014 by Katharine Dunn
    Pawan Sinha

    Pawan Sinha

    In a paper published this month, MIT researchers suggest that many of the varied symptoms that characterize autism may be explained by a difficulty with making predictions. The ability to predict is fundamental to tasks as diverse as adjusting to sensory stimuli and inferring other’s mental states based on the context. When prediction is compromised, a person lives in a “seemingly ‘magical’ world wherein events occur unexpectedly and without cause,” write the authors, who include professors Pawan Sinha and Richard Held from the Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences. Impaired predictive skills can make the world feel overwhelming and may lead to some of the behaviors linked to autism, such as repetitive behavior or difficulty gauging social situations.

    In devising their hypothesis, the researchers reviewed more than 100 studies and accounts of autism over more than three decades, with the goal of finding a common and coherent basis for the disorder. A new theory of autism could help researchers design to more effective therapies to treat it.

    “At the moment, the treatments that have been developed are driven by the end symptoms. We’re suggesting that the deeper issue is a predictive difficulty, which may, therefore, be a better target for interventions,” says Sinha.

    Explore Professor Sinha’s research in the Open Access Articles collection in DSpace@MIT, where it is openly accessible to the world.

    Since the MIT faculty established their Open Access Policy in March 2009 they have made thousands of research papers freely available to the world via DSpace@MIT. To highlight that research, we’re offering a series of blog posts that link news stories about scholars’ work to their open access papers in DSpace.

    OA research in the news: Study shows “substantial learning” in MOOC

    Posted October 1st, 2014 by Katharine Dunn
    by Ilonka Hebels, licensed under under CC-BY-NC-SA 2.0

    by Ilonka Hebels, licensed under under CC-BY-NC-SA 2.0

    Massive open online courses, or MOOCs, appear to be thriving. Want to hear about the “violent universe” from faculty at the Australian National University? Or take an introductory class on the music business from the renowned Berklee College of Music? These and hundreds of other courses have been offered on platforms like edX, Coursera, or Udacity in the two-and-a-half years since edX ran one of the first MOOCs out of MIT. Enticed by personal or professional edification, as well as the by the cost (free), thousands of people worldwide have signed up for online classes.

    But are MOOC students learning anything?

    This question has been little explored in the online teaching arena. Now, researchers including MIT physics professor David Pritchard, have published a study showing “substantial learning” in an edX MOOC. Using pretest and posttest questions, as well as analyzing homework and test results throughout the course, the researchers found that online students improved as well as or better than those in previously studied traditional classes.

    Explore Professor Pritchard’s research in the Open Access Articles collection in DSpace@MIT, where it is openly accessible to the world.

    Since the MIT faculty established their Open Access Policy in March 2009 they have made thousands of research papers freely available to the world via DSpace@MIT. To highlight that research, we’re offering a series of blog posts that link news stories about scholars’ work to their open access papers in DSpace.

    Chemistry societies and open access: new options for authors

    Posted September 22nd, 2014 by Ellen Duranceau
    OA speakers

    Pictured above, L to R from top: Professor Christopher Cummins; Jennifer Griffiths, RSC; Mary Yess, ECS; Kevin Davies, ACS

    The MIT Libraries are sponsoring a panel discussion on October 24 which will give authors an opportunity to hear directly from three chemistry societies about their new open access publishing options, and future plans.

    Each of these societies has recently expanded their open access programs, and has announced new ways for authors to make their journal articles openly accessible.

    The panel will be moderated by Steve Gass, Interim Director of Libraries, and will include:

    • Professor of Chemistry Christopher Cummins, who will offer his perspective as an MIT author and Associate Editor for the journal Chemical Science (published by the Royal Society of Chemistry).
    • American Chemical Society: Kevin Davies, VP of business development.
    • Electrochemical Society: Mary Yess, Deputy Executive Director/Chief Content Officer & Publisher.
    • Royal Society of Chemistry: Jennifer Griffiths, Editorial Development Manager for North America.

    Short remarks from each speaker will be followed by a discussion.

    Please join us for this panel, held in honor of International Open Access Week:

    Date: October 24, 2014
    Time: 12:00-1:00
    Location: Room 2-105
    Refreshments: a light lunch will be available at 11:45.

    OA research in the news: Bhatia wins Lemelson-MIT Prize

    Posted September 17th, 2014 by Katharine Dunn
    Sangeeta Bhatia

    Sangeeta Bhatia

    Biomedical engineer and professor Sangeeta Bhatia has been awarded the 2014 Lemelson-MIT Prize, worth $500,000, which goes to mid-career inventors with a commitment to mentoring others and bettering the world with their work. Bhatia was cited for building “tiny technologies” in medicine that address complex problems in areas like drug toxicity, tissue regeneration, cancer therapeutics, and infectious disease. Among her inventions is a paper urine test for detecting cancer that has been adapted for use in developing areas.

    Explore Professor Bhatia’s research in the Open Access Articles collection in DSpace@MIT, where it is openly accessible to the world.

    Since the MIT faculty established their Open Access Policy in March 2009 they have made thousands of research papers freely available to the world via DSpace@MIT. To highlight that research, we’re offering a series of blog posts that link news stories about scholars’ work to their open access papers in DSpace.

    OA research in the news: Ebola outbreak linked to funeral

    Posted September 3rd, 2014 by Katharine Dunn

    In a study published last week, researchers including MIT Biology professor Eric Lander show that this year’s explosive Ebola outbreak in West Africa possibly stemmed from the burial of a traditional healer at which 14 women were infected. Scientists sequenced the Ebola virus from 78 patients treated in Sierra Leone and found that the virus for all 78 could be traced to funeral guests. They also determined that the current Ebola strain is genetically distinct from a previous strain circulating elsewhere in Africa. This information could help scientists and public health officials determine which diagnostic tests and drugs may be most effective on the infection. Five authors on the study, all staff members at a hospital in Kenema, Sierra Leone, died of Ebola before the paper was published.

    Explore Professor Lander’s research in the Open Access Articles collection in DSpace@MIT, where it is openly accessible to the world.

    Since the MIT faculty established their Open Access Policy in March 2009 they have made thousands of research papers freely available to the world via DSpace@MIT. To highlight that research, we’re offering a series of blog posts that link news stories about scholars’ work to their open access papers in DSpace.

    New Requirements for DOE-funded Researchers: Public Access to Data and Publications

    Posted August 18th, 2014 by Ellen Duranceau

    In response to the 2013 Memorandum from the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, “Expanding Public Access to the Results of Federally Funded Research,” the Department of Energy (DOE) has issued a Public Access Plan.  The DOE is the first agency to release its open access plan in response to this directive, which applies to the largest federal agencies.

    doe logoThe aim of the directive is to ensure that “the direct results of federally funded scientific research are made available to and useful for the public, industry, and the scientific community.”

    Publications

    Under the DOE plan, researchers will be required to submit accepted manuscripts of publications that report on DOE-supported research to an open access repository such as DSpace@MIT.  Researchers will also need to submit information about their publications to the DOE’s Office of Scientific and Technical Information.   DOE will begin to include these requirements in award agreements as of October 1, 2014.

    Data

    Also under the plan, researchers will be required to include in grant proposals a Data Management Plan outlining how the data generated in research will be shared and preserved.   These requirements take effect October 1, 2014 for the DOE’s Office of Science and by October 1, 2015 for other DOE offices.

    The Libraries can help you comply with these new requirements:

    In coming months, the Libraries will be evaluating what other services may be of help to DOE-funded researchers. If you have comments or suggestions, please contact:

    For publications: contact Ellen Finnie Duranceau, Program Manager, Scholarly Publishing, Copyright, and Licensing, MIT Libraries

    For data: contact the MIT Libraries’ data management team

    OA research in the news: Report on the future of MIT education

    Posted August 6th, 2014 by Katharine Dunn

    This week, MIT President Rafael Reif released the final report of the Institute-wide Task Force on the Future of MIT Education, which “marks the beginning of an exciting new period of educational experimentation at MIT,” he wrote in a letter to the community.

    Among other things, the report addresses MIT’s role in MOOCs, or massive open online courses, and suggests that MIT consider offering different levels of certification for students enrolled in classes through MITx and edX. It also recommends increasing the Institute’s undergraduate population or allowing students to complete their degrees in fewer than four years. The Task Force has been chaired by two faculty members: Karen Willcox, a professor of aeronautics and astronautics, and Sanjay Sarma, a professor of engineering who is also MIT’s director of digital learning.

    Explore Professor Willcox’s research and Professor Sarma’s research in the Open Access Articles collection in DSpace@MIT, where it is openly accessible to the world.

    Since the MIT faculty established their Open Access Policy in March 2009 they have made thousands of research papers freely available to the world via DSpace@MIT. To highlight that research, we’re offering a series of blog posts that link news stories about scholars’ work to their open access papers in DSpace.

    OA research in the news: Reader for the visually impaired

    Posted July 23rd, 2014 by Katharine Dunn

    ring_in_use_correctedResearchers in the Media Lab’s Fluid Interfaces Group have built a prototype of a device that helps visually impaired people read printed text. The FingerReader, developed by graduate student Roy Shilkrot and professor Pattie Maes, among others, sits like a ring on a user’s finger and scans words via a built-in camera as the user points to them. Software identifies the words and translates them into an audio track. The FingerReader also alerts users if their finger veers away from a line of text.

    Though the FingerReader isn’t on the market, the researchers say they’re looking into this option. As Maes recently told the Associated Press, the FingerReader is “a lot more flexible, a lot more immediate than any solution that they have right now.”

    Explore Professor Maes’s research in the Open Access Articles collection in DSpace@MIT, where it is openly accessible to the world.

    Since the MIT faculty established their Open Access Policy in March 2009 they have made thousands of research papers freely available to the world via DSpace@MIT. To highlight that research, we’re offering a series of blog posts that link news stories about scholars’ work to their open access papers in DSpace.

    OA research in the news: Robotics expert Seth Teller dies

    Posted July 9th, 2014 by Katharine Dunn
    Seth Teller

    Seth Teller

    Seth Teller, a professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS) and head of the Robotics, Vision, and Sensor Networks group, died last week at the age of 50. In a message to the EECS community, several of Teller’s colleagues wrote: “There can be no doubt of the magnitude of the loss we face on both a personal and professional level. Seth’s outstanding contributions as a researcher, teacher, mentor, and colleague set a standard that has inspired many of us. He was a generous, warm person whose passion for his work was contagious. He had a unique ability to envision new approaches to problems, then assemble, motivate, and guide large research teams to accomplish things far beyond what they thought possible.”

    Teller worked in a wide range of fields, including robotics, vision, graphics, and human-computer interfaces. He recently led the MIT team that will compete in the finals of the DARPA Robotics Challenge, the goal of which is to develop robots that can help humans in disaster zones. He was also a leader of MIT’s Fifth Sense Project, whose researchers develop wearable devices to assist blind and low-vision people.

    Explore Professor Teller’s research in the Open Access Articles collection in DSpace@MIT, where it is openly accessible to the world.

    Since the MIT faculty established their Open Access Policy in March 2009 they have made thousands of research papers freely available to the world via DSpace@MIT. To highlight that research, we’re offering a series of blog posts that link news stories about scholars’ work to their open access papers in DSpace.

    OA research in the news: The cost of patent trolls

    Posted June 25th, 2014 by Katharine Dunn
    Catherine Tucker

    Catherine Tucker

    A new study by a Sloan researcher suggests that the recent increase of so-called “patent trolls”—companies that do little more than sue others over patent rights—has resulted in a huge loss of entrepreneurial activity in the United States. The study, by marketing professor Catherine Tucker, correlates patent litigation and venture capital (VC) investment using data from 1995 to 2012. The “evidence suggests that more lawsuits can distract management from developing new and innovative products, and may cause them to ignore products targeted by lawsuits, in addition to the more obvious litigation costs,” she writes. The paper says that VC investment would have been more than $21 billion higher over five years if not for lawsuits brought over patents by frequent litigators.

    Explore Professor Tucker’s research in the Open Access Articles collection in DSpace@MIT, where it is openly accessible to the world.

    Since the MIT faculty established their Open Access Policy in March 2009 they have made thousands of research papers freely available to the world via DSpace@MIT. To highlight that research, we’re offering a series of blog posts that link news stories about scholars’ work to their open access papers in DSpace.

    OA research in the news: Anand wins 2014 Drucker Medal

    Posted June 11th, 2014 by Katharine Dunn
    Lallit Anand

    Lallit Anand

    Mechanical engineering professor Lallit Anand has won the 2014 Daniel C. Drucker Medal, awarded by the Applied Mechanics Division of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. The medal is one of the highest distinctions a mechanician can achieve. Anand was cited for his “seminal contributions to the formulation of constitutive theories for the plastic response of a variety of engineering solids, including polycrystalline metals, metallic glasses, glassy polymers, and granular materials.”

    Explore Professor Anand’s research in the Open Access Articles collection in DSpace@MIT, where it is openly accessible to the world.

    Since the MIT faculty established their Open Access Policy in March 2009 they have made thousands of research papers freely available to the world via DSpace@MIT. To highlight that research, we’re offering a series of blog posts that link news stories about scholars’ work to their open access papers in DSpace

    OA research in the news: Storms peaking further from tropics

    Posted May 28th, 2014 by Katharine Dunn
    image from the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

    image from the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

    A new study coauthored by an MIT faculty member shows that powerful tropical storms are peaking in intensity further away from the equator. The migration of these cyclones, hurricanes, and typhoons is significant in part because residents and infrastructure where the storms now make landfall may be unprepared for them and thus in more danger. As well, the authors write, these cyclones “have an important role in maintaining regional water resources, and a poleward migration of storm tracks could threaten potable water supplies in some regions while increasing flooding events in others.”

    While the paper makes a link between the storms’ shift and global warming, coauthor Kerry Emanuel, a professor of atmospheric science in the department of Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences, says that researchers are continuing to examine this. Tropical winds have also expanded towards the poles in recent years. And, Emanuel told the MIT News, “as that belt migrates poleward, which surely it must as the whole ocean warms, the tropical cyclone genesis regions might just move with it. But we have more work to do to nail it down.”

    Explore Professor Emanuel’s research in the Open Access Articles collection in DSpace@MIT, where it is openly accessible to the world.

    Since the MIT faculty established their Open Access Policy in March 2009 they have made thousands of research papers freely available to the world via DSpace@MIT. To highlight that research, we’re offering a series of blog posts that link news stories about scholars’ work to their open access papers in DSpace.

    Two million downloads — a new open access milestone

    Posted May 21st, 2014 by Ellen Duranceau

    This month the MIT Faculty Open Access Policy hit a new milestone: papers made openly available through the Open Access Articles Collection have been downloaded over 2 million times. Total downloads from the collection of just under 12,000 papers reached 2,012,312 by the end of April, 2014.

    This new watershed was reached just one year after celebrating the 1 millionth download — a new peak of one million downloads in one year.

    Those are not the only new high water marks: In March, at the fifth anniversary of the faculty’s establishment of the Policy, monthly downloads reached over 100,000 for the first time:

    oa downloads by month through april 2014

    The downloads originate from across the globe, offering access to grateful readers from many walks of life.

    More about the MIT Faculty Open Access Policy:

    FAQ about the Policy
    Deposit a paper under the Policy

    Ellen Finnie Duranceau / Program Manager, Scholarly Publishing, Copyright, and Licensing / MIT Libraries

    OA research in the news: The structure of onscreen feelings

    Posted May 14th, 2014 by Katharine Dunn

    The-Forms-of-the-AffectsCan lines, shapes, and colors express emotions in movies? In her new book, “The Forms of the Affects,” literature professor Eugenie Brinkema closely looks at these properties in films like “Psycho” and “Open Water” and argues that they do. In her view, emotions or “affect” need not only be observed by watching characters embody a feeling like anxiety or grief. Rather, Brinkema says that formal properties like repetition, duration, and lighting show the emotion themselves.

    Take the film “Open Water,” in which a husband and wife are accidentally left behind in shark-infested waters during a scuba diving trip. The movie is frightening and anxiety producing, in part, says Brinkema, because of its visual frame. Most scenes show the sea and the sky with a horizontal line between them. As time goes on in the film, that line is interrupted by shark fins above and bodies disappearing below.

    “The commonplace assumption is that spectators pay money to go to horror films because it will make us feel anxious, and then we cathartically leave the theater at the end of the day and feel fine. But what if [the film’s] anxiety has to do with the specific visual form of movement and time?” Brinkema told the MIT News.

    Explore Professor Brinkema’s research in the Open Access Articles collection in DSpace@MIT, where it is openly accessible to the world. Brinkema also has a newly published course on MIT OpenCourseWare.

    Since the MIT faculty established their Open Access Policy in March 2009 they have made thousands of research papers freely available to the world via DSpace@MIT. To highlight that research, we’re offering a series of blog posts that link news stories about scholars’ work to their open access papers in DSpace.

    RSC, ACS offer new open access options for authors

    Posted May 14th, 2014 by Katharine Dunn

    In the last year, two major chemistry publishers have expanded their open access options.

    The Royal Society of Chemistry continues to offer its “Gold for Gold” vouchers, launched in 2013, which allow authors to publish their otherwise “closed” articles as open access articles without charge. The Libraries receive a limited number of vouchers based on the cost of providing RSC journals at MIT, and we distribute them on a first-come, first-served basis. If you have an article in the RSC publication process now and would like to make it open access at no cost, email rscvouchers@mit.edu with your name, the title of your article, and the RSC journal you’re publishing in.

    The American Chemical Society recently announced a new series of open access options for authors that include an open access journal, more flexible reuse licenses for articles, and, for the rest of 2014, free deposits of NIH-funded ACS articles to PubMed Central.

    There are four main components to the ACS open access program:

    •  ACS Central Science, an open access, peer-reviewed journal to launch later this year, will publish 100-200 articles annually across the chemical sciences. There will be no subscription fees to read the articles, nor any author processing charges to publish in the journal unless authors want to distribute articles under a Creative Commons license. CC licenses allow authors to modify their copyright terms so that other people can use, share, or even build upon a work, depending on the license authors choose. Authors can distribute ACS Central Science articles under a Creative Commons Attribution license for a fee of $500 for ACS members and $1000 for non-members in 2014.
    • ACS AuthorChoice, in which authors pay a fee to make articles open access, has been available to authors for several years. In 2014 ACS expanded it so that authors can now choose immediate or 12-month embargoed (AuthorChoice+12) open access. Other changes include:
      • For NIH-funded authors: In 2014 ACS is giving authors a free AuthorChoice+12 license and will deposit the ACS version of record to PubMed Central on their behalf. Authors need to acknowledge NIH funding when they publish. Starting in 2015, authors will need to pay for a PMC deposit of the ACS version unless they use Author Rewards (see below).

        Note: There is never a charge for authors to deposit their final manuscripts to PMC themselves.
      • Authors can now choose one of three licenses when they pay for AuthorChoice or AuthorChoice+12: the standard ACS AuthorChoice license or one of two Creative Commons licenses. There are additional fees for the CC licenses.
    • ACS Author Rewards: The corresponding author of each ACS article published in 2014 will receive two credits of $750 that can be used (individually or combined) to offset charges to make new or previously published articles open access. The Author Rewards must be used by the end of 2017, and the eligible corresponding author can transfer credits to co-authors or other colleagues.
    • ACS Editor’s Choice: Each day, ACS makes one newly published, peer-reviewed article openly available to highlight work of public interest. The chosen articles can be read for free, and their authors receive ACS AuthorChoice publishing licenses for no fee.

    For more information or to offer feedback on these options:

    RSC’s Gold for Gold FAQ

    ACS’s Open Access Initiatives FAQ

    Erja Kajosalo, Chemistry & Chemical Engineering Librarian

    Katharine Dunn, Scholarly Communications Librarian

    OA research in the news: New building will house nanoscale research

    Posted April 30th, 2014 by Katharine Dunn

    NewsImage_MITnano-3Starting in summer 2015, construction will begin on a 200,000-square-foot building called “MIT.nano” that will replace Building 12 on the MIT campus. The building, to be completed by 2018, will include cutting edge facilities to support research with nanoscale materials and processes. About one quarter of MIT’s graduate students and 20 percent of its researchers across many fields will make use of the facility, according to Vladimir Bulović, an electrical engineering professor and the faculty lead on the MIT.nano project.

    “This building needs to be centrally located, because nanoscale research is now central to so many disciplines,” Bulović told the MIT News. “[It] was designed to encourage collaboration.”

    Explore Professor Bulović’s research in the Open Access Articles collection in DSpace@MIT, where it is openly accessible to the world.

    Since the MIT faculty established their Open Access Policy in March 2009 they have made thousands of research papers freely available to the world via DSpace@MIT. To highlight that research, we’re offering a series of blog posts that link news stories about scholars’ work to their open access papers in DSpace.

    MIT Libraries launches online Fair Use Quiz for students

    Posted April 29th, 2014 by Katharine Dunn

    fairusequizThe MIT Libraries’ Office of Scholarly Publishing, Copyright, and Licensing has launched an online Fair Use Quiz to help students better understand the core concepts of copyright law’s “fair use” provision, the flexible — but notably ambiguous — exception under US copyright law that makes it possible to use others’ copyrighted works without permission. The aim of the quiz is to put information about fair use in the hands of students and empower them to make informed decisions about using copyrighted works.

    The self-guided quiz, which also covers the basics of copyright and addresses website “terms of use,” takes only about 10 minutes to complete. It walks through four cases, including use of images and data in several scenarios.

    The quiz can help students answer questions such as whether it’s possible to use a figure from a scholarly journal in a thesis, or whether a particular image can be uploaded to a class blog. Is there one correct answer for these questions? Probably not: Applying fair use can be complex, but the quiz attempts to give students the tools to make their own assessments.

    Earlier this year, we got feedback from undergraduate and graduate students on a beta version of the quiz and adapted it accordingly. If you have any comments, please email copyright-lib@mit.edu, or contact any of the staff in the Office of Scholarly Publishing, Copyright, and Licensing. We would very much appreciate hearing from you.


    OA research in the news: Germs that go to great lengths

    Posted April 16th, 2014 by Katharine Dunn
    by 729:512. CC-BY-NC https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.0/

    “Sneeze vector” by 729:512. CC-BY-NC license https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.0/

    A new study by MIT researchers shows that the droplets our noses and mouths release during coughs and sneezes can travel much further than previously thought. John Bush, a professor of applied mathematics, and Lydia Bourouiba, an assistant professor in the department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, are two of the coauthors on a recent paper, “Violent expiratory events: on coughing and sneezing.”  The researchers directly observed sneezing and coughing, and also simulated it in the lab, and found that coughs and sneezes produce “turbulent buoyant momentum puffs,” or respiratory clouds, that can carry potentially infected droplets five to 200 times further than known before. This could mean airborne pathogens are more easily transmitted through ventilation systems and enclosed spaces.

    Explore Professor Bush’s research and Professor Bourouiba’s research in the Open Access Articles collection in DSpace@MIT, where it is openly accessible to the world.

    Since the MIT faculty established their Open Access Policy in March 2009 they have made thousands of research papers freely available to the world via DSpace@MIT. To highlight that research, we’re offering a series of blog posts that link news stories about scholars’ work to their open access papers in DSpace.