Scholarly Communication

OA research in the news: MIT’s influence on US economics

Posted March 4th, 2015 by Katharine Dunn

In his New York Times blog last week, economist and MIT alum Paul Krugman writes about the “triumph” of MIT’s economics department as described in the 2014 book MIT and the Transformation of American Economics, whose coauthors include MIT professor Peter Temin.

The book explores how economics in the United States became more math-focused after World War II, in part led by MIT economist and Nobel Laureate Paul Samuelson, but it stops around 1970. Krugman argues for the importance of the decade that followed, with graduates like Ben Bernanke, MIT professor Olivier Blanchard, and others, including himself. (Krugman won the Nobel Prize in 2008.) “[R]ight now a remarkable number of the professional economists who either play important roles in making policy or appear to have influence on the discussion got their Ph.Ds from MIT in the second half of the 1970s,” he writes.

Explore Professor Temin’s  research and Professor Blanchard’s research in the Open Access Articles collection in DSpace@MIT, where it is openly accessible to the world.

Since the MIT faculty established their Open Access Policy in March 2009 they have made thousands of research papers freely available to the world via DSpace@MIT. To highlight that research, we’re offering a series of blog posts that link news stories about scholars’ work to their open access papers in DSpace.

MIT Libraries release Fair Use Quiz in mobile-friendly version

Posted February 26th, 2015 by Ellen Duranceau

In celebration of Fair Use Week, the MIT Libraries’ Office of Scholarly Publishing, Copyright, and Licensing has launched a mobile version of the web-based Fair Use Quiz that was initially released last year.

fair use quiz tool screen shot

The quiz is designed to help students better understand the core concepts of copyright law’s “fair use” provision, the flexible — but notably ambiguous — exception under US copyright law that makes it possible to use others’ copyrighted works without permission. The aim of the quiz is to put information about fair use in the hands of students and empower them to make informed decisions about using copyrighted works.

The self-guided quiz, which also covers the basics of copyright and how copyright intersects with website “terms of use,” takes only about 10 minutes to complete. It walks through four cases, assisting  students in considering, for example, whether it would be fair use to incorporate a figure from a scholarly journal in a thesis, or an image into a course blog.

Applying fair use can be complex; this quiz is intended to help students navigate some of the nuances and make their own assessments.

We welcome comments or questions.

For more information on copyright and fair use, please see the Scholarly Publishing website.

 

NASA Releases Public Access Plan

Posted February 24th, 2015 by Ellen Duranceau

NASA released its Public Access Plan February 11, 2015, in compliance with the White House Directive. The policy covers both publications and data.nasa logo

Publications

NASA’s plan requires that authors make final peer-reviewed accepted journal manuscripts (or, by publisher agreement, the final published version of record) openly accessible.

  • The articles must be available no later than 12 months following publication, unless there is a successful petition by a publisher for a longer embargo period.
  • Access will be through a NASA portal to the PubMed Central (PMC) platform.
  • The “system will ensure that the public can read, download, and analyze [the articles] in digital form” with “bulk downloads for research purposes… permitted as an acceptable use.”

Data

All proposals or project plans submitted to NASA now are “required to include a Data Management Plan (DMP) that describes whether and how data generated through the course of the proposed research will be shared and preserved (including timeframe).”

  • The policy focuses on “research data that underlie the results and findings in peer-reviewed publications.”
  • This data must be accessible at the time of publication or “within a reasonable time period.”
  • Data can be made available via a journal publisher, through NASA archives, or another data repository.
  • As January 1, 2015, terms and conditions of funding for grants, contracts, directed research projects, and other agreements include these requirements.

Whitehouse Office of Science and Technology Policy Directive

The NASA policy is the latest issued under the White House directive on open access to publications and data that requires Federal agencies with annual spending of more than $100M in Research & Development to develop plans to make the data and publications that flow from the research they fund openly available to the public.

Major policies that affect MIT researchers will be summarized on the scholarly publishing website as they emerge.

The Libraries can help you comply with these new requirements:

If you have comments or questions, please contact:

For publications: contact Ellen Finnie Duranceau, Program Manager, Scholarly Publishing, Copyright, and Licensing, MIT Libraries

For data: contact the MIT Libraries’ data management team

OA research in the news: How global warming can worsen snowfalls

Posted February 18th, 2015 by Katharine Dunn
Photo by Peter Eimon. Licensed under CC-BY-NC-SA.

Photo by Peter Eimon. Licensed under CC-BY-NC-SA.

In the last month, Boston has set a string of records: Most snowfall in the city in a 30-day period (90.2 inches); deepest snow in a day (37 inches); fastest six-foot snowfall (in 18 days, crushing the previous record of 45 days). The list is long. Civic pride in the achievements has run rather short.

What happened to the notion that climate change will mean more warmth and less snow?

“In some regions, fairly cold regions, you could have a decrease in the average snowfall in a year, but actually an intensification of the snowfall extremes,” atmospheric science professor Paul O’Gorman told the Boston Globe earlier this month, explaining research he published last summer.

O’Gorman cautions that it’s not easy to link global temperature changes to extreme snowfall. But, he told the Globe, Boston’s midwinter temperatures are already close to the “optimal range” for heavy snowfall, and changes in the position of storm tracks or an increase of water vapor in the atmosphere—both the result of global warming—could make the storms more frequent.

Explore Professor O’Gorman’s  research in the Open Access Articles collection in DSpace@MIT, where it is openly accessible to the world.

Since the MIT faculty established their Open Access Policy in March 2009 they have made thousands of research papers freely available to the world via DSpace@MIT. To highlight that research, we’re offering a series of blog posts that link news stories about scholars’ work to their open access papers in DSpace.

Public Access Policy Released: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality

Posted February 13th, 2015 by Ellen Duranceau

The Agency for Healthcare Research aahrq logond Quality  (AHRQ) released its Public Access policy in February 2015, in compliance with the White House Directive. The policy covers both publications and data.

Publications
As of February 2015, AHRQ requires that authors submit the final peer-reviewed accepted journal manuscripts to PubMed Central (PMC). The AHRQ “will accept the final published article [instead of the manuscript], provided the awardee can ensure AHRQ has the rights to make the published version public.” The articles must be available no later than 12 months following publication.

Data
As of October 2015, AHRQ-funded researchers “will be required to include a data management plan for sharing final research data in digital format, or state why data sharing is not possible.” The policy focuses on data “necessary to validate research findings including data sets used to support scholarly publications.” AHRQ will contract with a commercial repository that will accept and manage the data.

Whitehouse Office of Science and Technology Policy Directive

The AHRQ policy is the latest issued under the White House directive that requires Federal agencies with annual spending of more than $100M in Research & Development to develop plans to make the data and publications that flow from the research they fund openly available to the public.

doe logoThe DOE was the first agency to release its open access plan in response to this directive.  Other agencies are expected to release their plans in the coming months. Major policies that affect MIT researchers will be summarized on the scholarly publishing website as they emerge.

The Libraries can help you comply with these new requirements:

  • For assistance in creating your data management plan for the DOE or AHRQ, or for any aspect of complying with the funder data sharing requirements, contact the Libraries’ data management team at data-management@mit.edu.
  • To comply with the DOE publication requirements, MIT researchers may submit their final accepted manuscripts to MIT’s institutional repository DSpace@MIT through a simple web form.

In coming months, the Libraries will be evaluating what other services may be of help to researchers in complying with these public access policies. If you have comments or suggestions, please contact:

For publications: contact Ellen Finnie Duranceau, Program Manager, Scholarly Publishing, Copyright, and Licensing, MIT Libraries

For data: contact the MIT Libraries’ data management team

 

 

 

OA research in the news: Does church attendance cause people to vote?

Posted February 4th, 2015 by Katharine Dunn
Photo by Shawn Harquall. Licensed under CC-By-NC

Photo by Shawn Harquall. Licensed under CC-BY-NC

In a paper published last month, researchers including MIT economist Jonathan Gruber use the repeal of Sunday shopping (or “blue”) laws in various states to determine that church attendance “may have a significant causal effect” on voter turnout in elections. They find that the repeal of blue laws, which restrict Sunday retail activity, caused a 5 percent decrease in church attendance; this in turn led to a 1 percent fall in participation at the voting booth.

Previous work has shown that churchgoers are 10 to 15 percent more likely to vote, but these studies reveal associations rather than causal effects. Gruber and colleagues seek to press further. As they note in the paper, “One promising strategy for doing so is to find changes in the environment which impact religious participation but not other relevant behaviors, and then to trace through the effects on other aspects of life, such as political participation. The repeal of the blue laws provides an example of such a change.”

The work could have implications for further evaluating the effects of public policies on religious organizations.

Explore Professor Gruber’s research in the Open Access Articles collection in DSpace@MIT, where it is openly accessible to the world.

Since the MIT faculty established their Open Access Policy in March 2009 they have made thousands of research papers freely available to the world via DSpace@MIT. To highlight that research, we’re offering a series of blog posts that link news stories about scholars’ work to their open access papers in DSpace.

OA research in the news: What our sewage says about us

Posted January 21st, 2015 by Katharine Dunn
photo by Patrick Brosset. Licensed under CC-BY-NC https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.0/

photo by Patrick Brosset. Licensed under CC-BY-NC

This month, MIT researchers and local public health officials will gather and analyze waste from Cambridge sewers in search of insights into the health of city dwellers. Members of the “Underworlds” project, led by architect Carlo Ratti of the Senseable City Lab and bioengineering professor Eric Alm, will screen samples for viruses like the flu, bacteria like those that cause cholera, and biochemical flags for drugs and other compounds.

“Sewage is really an unexploited source of rich information about human activities,” Alm told the Boston Globe.

The researchers have a $4 million grant through the Kuwait-MIT Center for Natural Resources and the Environment and plan to use the initial samples to develop a software program that will help analyze data. One goal is to use sewage data to help predict epidemics.

Explore Professor Alm’s research in the Open Access Articles collection in DSpace@MIT, where it is openly accessible to the world.

Since the MIT faculty established their Open Access Policy in March 2009 they have made thousands of research papers freely available to the world via DSpace@MIT. To highlight that research, we’re offering a series of blog posts that link news stories about scholars’ work to their open access papers in DSpace.

Updated MIT amendment to publication agreements released: incorporates new federal public access requirements

Posted January 12th, 2015 by Ellen Duranceau

Two new versions of the MIT amendment to publication agreements have been released, in order to provide MIT authors with an amendment that incorporates the public access requirements of the 2013 White House Directive. This directive from the Office of Science and Technology Policy focuses on “Expanding Public Access to the Results of Federally Funded Research,” including making publications funded by major US agencies openly accessible.

screen shot MIT amendment web page revised with WH directive versionsThe revised versions of the amendment are currently appropriate for researchers funded by the Department of Energy, whose requirements for sharing publications under the Directive began taking effect in October 2014.  Other major US agencies that sponsor research are expected to be releasing their requirements early in 2015, and the revised versions of the amendment are designed to be appropriate for those agencies as well.

There are two versions of the MIT amendment: one for faculty authors which also references rights related to the MIT Faculty Open Access Policy, and one for other MIT authors, which does not reference rights related to the faculty Policy.

These new versions, as with prior versions, may be attached to a standard publication agreement, with an indication that the signature on the agreement is subject to the attached amendment, which is also signed by the author.  The MIT amendment provides legally vetted language that retains key rights of interest to many MIT authors (such as the right to share their articles openly on the web) and rights required to meet the obligations of research funders, as well as those reflected in the faculty’s Open Access Policy.

Please contact Ellen Finnie Duranceau, Program Manager, Scholarly Publishing, Copyright, and Licensing, with any questions about the use of the MIT amendment.

 

OA research in the news: Murray receives award from Queen Elizabeth

Posted January 8th, 2015 by Katharine Dunn

Murray_Fiona_Bio_120pxEntrepreneurship professor Fiona Murray, the Sloan School of Management’s associate dean for innovation, has been named a Commander in the Order of the British Empire (CBE). Murray is cited for her work to “improve the UK’s entrepreneurial community, which has led to improved trade and investment opportunities between the UK and USA.” Read more about Murray’s work in a 2013 interview with the MIT News.

Explore Professor Murray’s research in the Open Access Articles collection in DSpace@MIT, where it is openly accessible to the world.

Since the MIT faculty established their Open Access Policy in March 2009 they have made thousands of research papers freely available to the world via DSpace@MIT. To highlight that research, we’re offering a series of blog posts that link news stories about scholars’ work to their open access papers in DSpace.

Publishing and copyright — IAP workshops provide pathways through the maze

Posted January 6th, 2015 by Ellen Duranceau

The MIT Libraries’ Office of Scholarly Publishing, Copyright, and Licensing is offering seven IAP sessions devoted to publishing and copyright.  Three of the sessions offer introductions to publishing, including using independent book publishing services, understanding scholarly journal and book publishing processes (cosponsored with the MIT Press), and learning about alternative careers in publishing (cosponsored with the Graduate Student Council).

Two sessions cover publishing issues that intersect with copyright — one for graduate students writing theses, and a second focused on anyone who wants to use other people’s images or figures in new articles or other works.

For those whose research is funded by the Department of Energy (DOE), we are offering a session (with the Office of Sponsored Programs / OSP) on meeting the new DOE requirements for public access to data and publications.

A session on text-mining using APIs for scholarly resources will include hearing about two active research projects at MIT that involve using APIs that are available through Libraries’ subscriptions.

A complete list of the sessions appears below. To register for any of the sessions, please email the contact.

An Introduction to Independent Publishing  (With Professor Anne Whiston Spirn)
Wed Jan 14, 1:00-2:15pm, 14N-132
Contact: Katharine Dunn, khdunn@mit.edu

Research Funder Open Access Requirements from DOE and Other Federal Agencies (With OSP)
Thu Jan 15, 1:00-2:00, 1-150
Contact: Ellen Duranceau, efinnie@mit.edu

Alternative Careers Series for Grad Students: Careers in Publishing (With the GSC)
Fri Jan 16, 2:30-3:30pm, 3-270
Contact: Katharine Dunn, khdunn@mit.edu

Using Images in Your Work: A Look at Copyright, Fair Use, and Open Licensing
Wed Jan 21, 1:00pm-2:00pm, 14N-132
Contact: Ellen Duranceau, efinnie@mit.edu

Theses@MIT: Specifications and Copyright Issues
Mon Jan 26, 3:00-4:00pm, 14N-132
Contact: Ellen Duranceau, efinnie@mit.edu

APIs for Scholarly Resources: (With overviews of active text and data mining research projects)
Tue Jan 27, 12:00-1:00pm, 14N-132
Contact: Mark Clemente, clemente@mit.edu

From Submission to Publication: What Authors Need to Know About the Journal and Book Publishing Process (With the MIT Press)
Thu Jan 29, 3:00-4:30pm, 4-145
Contact: Ellen Duranceau, efinnie@mit.edu

 

OA research in the news: Longtime anthropologist retires from MIT

Posted December 18th, 2014 by Katharine Dunn
Jean Jackson

Jean Jackson

Jean Jackson, one of the earliest members of MIT’s Anthropology program and a founding member of the Women’s and Gender Studies program (formerly Women’s Studies), will retire this spring after 42 years as a faculty member. Jackson has done fieldwork in Mexico, Guatemala, and, for more than 45 years, Colombia. She’s written about kinship and marriage, anthropological linguistics, missionaries, and Colombia’s indigenous rights movement, among other topics. She’s now working on a book about the last two decades of her fieldwork, chronicling changes in indigenous activism in Colombia.

Over the years, Jackson has helped build a tight-knit community with her Anthropology colleagues. “She thinks ethically and acts ethically at every scale, from the global geopolitical to the very interpersonal politics of the department. She communicates through action that we’re all in it together,” Anthropology program head Stefan Helmreich told the MIT News. One of Jackson’s points of pride: “Everyone we have hired has received tenure.”

Explore Professor Jackson’s research in the Open Access Articles collection in DSpace@MIT, where it is openly accessible to the world.

Since the MIT faculty established their Open Access Policy in March 2009 they have made thousands of research papers freely available to the world via DSpace@MIT. To highlight that research, we’re offering a series of blog posts that link news stories about scholars’ work to their open access papers in DSpace.

OA research in the news: Adventures in product design

Posted December 10th, 2014 by Katharine Dunn

12_10s-2_finalThis week, dozens of MIT undergraduates showed off their work in a semester-end presentation for Product Engineering Processes, a class led by professor of mechanical engineering and engineering systems David Wallace. The theme of this year’s course was “Adventure,” and the eight teams built prototypes of devices for skiers, cyclists, skateboarders, musicians, parents, and amputees. Though the audience at Kresge Auditorium scored each presentation, Wallace said the main point of the evaluations was to help students improve their designs. “It’s not a competition; this is a learning adventure,” he said.

Explore Professor Wallace’s research in the Open Access Articles collection in DSpace@MIT, where it is openly accessible to the world.

Since the MIT faculty established their Open Access Policy in March 2009 they have made thousands of research papers freely available to the world via DSpace@MIT. To highlight that research, we’re offering a series of blog posts that link news stories about scholars’ work to their open access papers in DSpace.

IAP 2015: Research Funding and Publishing Opportunities

Posted December 8th, 2014 by Mark Szarko

stacksThinking about publishing? Looking for funding for your research? The MIT Libraries is hosting a series of classes this IAP to help! Some classes require advance registration.

Getting Started, Getting Funded: Obtaining Research Funding
Thu Jan 8, 1:00-5:00pm, E17-133
Contact: Randi Shapiro, shapiror@mit.edu

An Introduction to Independent Publishing
Wed Jan 14, 1:00-2:15pm, 14N-132
Contact: Katharine Dunn, khdunn@mit.edu

Research Funder Open Access Requirements from DOE and Other Federal Agencies
Thu Jan 15, 1:00-2:00, 1-150
Contact: Ellen Duranceau, efinnie@mit.edu

Alternative Careers Series for Grad Students: Careers in Publishing
Fri Jan 16, 2:30-3:30pm, 3-270
Contact: Katharine Dunn, khdunn@mit.edu

Theses@MIT: Specifications and Copyright Issues
Mon Jan 26, 3:00-4:00pm, 14N-132
Contact: Ellen Duranceau, efinnie@mit.edu

From Submission to Publication: What Authors Need to Know About the Journal and Book Publishing Process
Thu Jan 29, 3:00-4:30pm, 4-145
Contact: Ellen Duranceau, efinnie@mit.edu

For a complete list of all the classes offered by the Libraries this IAP, please see our calendar of events.

OA research in the news: Waves as scientific & cultural things

Posted November 25th, 2014 by Katharine Dunn

MorganLecture2014This fall, MIT anthropologist Stefan Helmreich gave the prestigious Lewis Henry Morgan Lecture at the University of Rochester. Helmreich, whose 2009 award-winning book Alien Ocean describes marine biologists studying deep-sea microbes, spoke about waves—in the water and elsewhere—and how scientists and others use the notion of a “wave” to describe many disparate phenomena.

“How do cardiologists tracking waves of electrical potential in the heart draw inspiration from research in physics? How has the image of the wave migrated into social theory, making it possible to speak of waves of opinion, of revolution, of immigration, of innovation? The cultural work of analogy in the sciences — natural and social both — fascinates me,” Helmreich told the MIT News last week.

Explore Professor Helmreich’s research in the Open Access Articles collection in DSpace@MIT, where it is openly accessible to the world.

Since the MIT faculty established their Open Access Policy in March 2009 they have made thousands of research papers freely available to the world via DSpace@MIT. To highlight that research, we’re offering a series of blog posts that link news stories about scholars’ work to their open access papers in DSpace.

Chris Bourg named director of MIT Libraries

Posted November 21st, 2014 by Heather Denny
CBourg photo blog

Chris Bourg (Photo by: Wayne Vanderkull)

Longtime libraries administrator at Stanford tapped to lead MIT’s libraries and the MIT Press.

Chris Bourg has been named as the new director of the MIT Libraries, effective in February. Provost Martin Schmidt announced her appointment today in an email to the MIT community.

Bourg comes to MIT from Stanford University, where she is currently associate university librarian for public services. At Stanford, Bourg oversees the largest division of the Stanford University Libraries, with six branches and a collection of more than 4 million volumes.

Bourg “has a deep appreciation for the critical role of scholarly communication in a research university environment, and how this communication links to education and service to the community,” Schmidt wrote in his email to the community. “She also has considerable experience with leveraging the capabilities of digital technologies in order to enhance library services.”

Bourg joins the MIT Libraries and MIT Press at a pivotal time, and will play an important role in guiding the redesign and renovation of library spaces. She will also lead the exploration of the Libraries’ role in new modes of learning and global engagement, and advance MIT’s commitment and influence in the area of scholarly communication and open access.

“I am very much looking forward to working with Chris as she undertakes the leadership of the MIT Libraries, particularly at a time when the nature of library services is evolving to accommodate a variety of needs related to research and education,” Schmidt wrote. “I know you will join me in welcoming her to the MIT community.”

As a senior officer with oversight responsibility for the MIT Press, Bourg will also provide strategic guidance to the Press, expanding international engagement and managing its evolving business models. The MIT Press is one of the largest university presses in the world; it publishes journals, scholarly books, trade books, textbooks, and reference works in print and digital formats in a wide range of academic disciplines.

Bourg’s appointment follows a nationwide search that began after the death of the Libraries’ previous director of 17 years, Ann Wolpert, in October 2013.

“I have long admired MIT’s commitment to openness, inclusion, and innovation,” Bourg says. “It is an honor to join a community of faculty, staff, and students with a global reputation for excellence, integrity, and service. I look forward to engaging in conversations across the MIT community about the future of library spaces, services, and resources. Together, with the talented staff of the libraries and the MIT Press, we have the opportunity to build on MIT’s legacy and to be a leader in creating new models for scholarly communication and research libraries. I am eager to get started.”

Read the full story on MIT News.

Publish open access in chemistry society journals at no charge

Posted November 14th, 2014 by Ellen Duranceau

Three chemistry societies have new open access options for MIT authors that allow for open access publication without any fee.

  • American Chemical Society/ACS: ACS’s open access strategy includes:
    • ACS Author Rewards, through which corresponding authors can apply credits gained by publishing articles with ACS towards open access fees, allowing authors to publish some articles open access at no cost.

    To take advantage of this free open access option:  Look for an email after acceptance of your article, with a link into the ACS ecommerce system and an order for making that article open access; enter the ACS Author Rewards promotional codes you have received in the “Discount” section. Or, if you cannot find that link, access your ACS ChemWorx account and look for the ACS AuthorChoice app, where you can enter the article’s DOI.

    • A new open access multidisciplinary journal, ACS Central Science, will launch in January 2015.

    logo acs
    To take advantage of this free open access option:   Submit your manuscript to ACS Central Science any time starting with December 2014.  There are no author fees for open access publication in this new journal.

    Also: ACS offers ACS Author Choice, a paid open access option, which is not free unless you use author rewards (see above), but which includes a 25% discount on open access fees for MIT authors because of MIT Libraries’ subscriptions.

  • Electrochemical Society/ECS:  As of early this year, all four of the ECS journals have an open access option. This option is currently free for MIT authors. 

    To take advantage of this free open access option: When submitting an article, the manuscript submission system will ask two questions:

      logo ecs

    • Do you want to publish as Open Access —the author should say ‘yes’
    • Do you have article credits to apply for the open access option – the author should indicate that they have credits because their institution, MIT, subscribes.

    These steps will ensure your article is published open access.

  • Royal Society of Chemistry/RSC: RSC is offering a new open access repository – the Chemical Sciences Article Repository, and two free open access journal options:
  • rsc publishing logo
     To take advantage of this free open access option:  request a voucher from the MIT Libraries.  A limited number of vouchers can be applied retrospectively to 2013 and 2014 articles, as well as to current articles.

    •  The RSC’s flagship journal, Chemical Science, will switch to open access as of 2015. There will be no author fees for at least two years.

     To take advantage of this free open access option:   Submit your manuscript to Chemical Science in 2015 or 2016.

     

    Ellen Finnie Duranceau / Program Manager, Scholarly Publishing, Copyright & Licensing / MIT Libraries / x38483

    Chemistry in the Open: MIT Professor Kit Cummins and three societies make the case for open access

    Posted November 7th, 2014 by Ellen Duranceau

    Leaders from three chemistry societies came to MIT during International Open Access Week to speak about their open access options for authors and their plans to provide more open access to the articles they publish. The panel, moderated by Steve Gass, Interim Director of Libraries, included Professor of Chemistry Christopher (Kit) Cummins, as well as representatives from the American Chemical Society (ACS), the Electrochemical Society (ECS), and the Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC).

    MIT Professor Kit Cummins’ comments underlined the problem authors want solved: “I would like my papers to be available to anyone who stumbles across them and wants to read them.” Cummins spoke compellingly of readers locked out, such as the “science teacher, the founder of a start-up – uses you hadn’t envisioned, that are enabled by open access.”

    “The vast majority of my papers are locked behind paywalls,” said Cummins. “My heart just bleeds for those papers.” He doesn’t think he’ll ever have the funds to unlock the papers, even though the results they contain will be “equally valid 100 years from now.”

    Pictured above, L to R from top: Professor Christopher Cummins; Jennifer Griffiths, RSC; Mary Yess, ECS; Kevin Davies, ACS

    Pictured above, L to R from top: Professor Christopher Cummins; Jennifer Griffiths, RSC; Mary Yess, ECS; Kevin Davies, ACS

    Fortunately, “the societies are doing a good job of figuring out how to offer open access,” he said. The society representatives, in what the moderator Steve Gass jokingly called a “speed dating” format, explained just what they are doing about offering open access in this evolving arena.

    Mary Yess, Deputy Executive Director and Chief Content Officer & Publisher at the ECS, reported that in May 2013, the ECS committed to an open access plan that addresses the ECS’ concern that open access not simply “shift the burden” from page charges to open access article processing fees.

      *As of early this year, all four of their journals have an open access option. This option is currently free for MIT authors.
      *ECS has pledged to be free of all author fees and subscription fees within a decade.

    Jennifer Griffiths, Editorial Development Manager for North America at the RSC, emphasized that the RSC offers open access options for authors through RSC journals, but also through a new open access repository – the Chemical Sciences Article Repository — which houses manuscripts from RSC and other publishers, and data as well. Griffiths described other details of the open access program, including:

      *Offering the “gold for gold” vouchers program where authors whose campus libraries have purchased the full RSC journals package – as at MIT—can request a voucher that will allow for open access publication of their article free of charge.
      *Switching their flagship journal, Chemical Science, to open access as of 2015, a move that was supported by Professor Cummins in his role as Associate Editor for the journal. There will be no author fees for at least two years.

    Kevin Davies, VP of business development at the American Chemical Society, reflected wryly that the ACS is not exactly known as being one of the “leading evangelists in open access,” in part because they have not heard their authors clamoring for it, but noted that the success of the open access model has become clear, manifested in the dramatic growth of journals such as PLoS One. As a society publisher, Davies said the ACS felt a responsibility to the chemistry community to offer the appropriate menu of publishing models sought by authors and/or necessitated by funders’ mandates.
    The ACS’s current open access strategy includes “four pillars”:

      *A new multidisciplinary journal, ACS Central Science, edited by HHMI and UC Berkeley chemical biologist Carolyn Bertozzi, which will launch in January 2015 and “aim high.”
      *ACS Author Rewards, through which corresponding authors can apply credits gained by publishing articles with ACS towards open access fees.
      *ACS Author Choice, a paid open access option.
      *ACS Editor’s Choice, through which one article per day, chosen by editors, is made openly available at the ACS site.

    The audience probed about peer review mechanisms, drawn to the modified model offered by PLoS One – which Davies described as comparable to an ice skating competition where everyone agrees to skip evaluating “artistic impression” and just focus on the “technical merit” — whether the skater has “landed the jump.”

    Others asked whether “open access goes far enough,” wondering about open access to original data and the complete methods section, so the work can be reproduced. Government mandates are beginning to require open access to the data, but as Griffiths of the RSC pointed out, open access to data is a “much more difficult problem” than for publications. Cummins noted that Xray crystallography data is submitted to a particular database that has evolved increased standardization of data formats, improving access as well as fraud detection. Journals are now also supporting access to data by allowing authors to submit a supporting information document with spectra included. ACS affirmed that they make all such documents open access; ECS allows posting of these materials.

    Cummins reflected that “we are in a transitional period in scientific publishing,” while Mary Yess of the ECS reinforced the same point, saying that “the models of scientific communication and publication—which have served us so well for so long—are no longer fully meeting the spirit of our mission, may not be financially viable, and are hurting the dissemination of the results of scientific research.”

    During this lively session, the panelists agreed that the time has come to provide more open access to chemistry, and that the societies have a special role to play in this shift. As Griffiths said about the RSC open access options, “We are doing this because we are a society.” From the author perspective, Cummins cut to the chase: “I want my work to be read by anybody.”

    For more information about the open access options described here, contact:
    Ellen Finnie Duranceau / Program Manager, Scholarly Publishing, Copyright, & Licensing, MIT Libraries / x38483 or
    Erja Kajosalo, Chemistry and Chemical Engineering Librarian, x39795.

    OA research in the news: AeroAstro turns 100

    Posted October 29th, 2014 by Katharine Dunn

    banner-al-ODLast week, MIT’s Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics celebrated its 100th anniversary with a three-day Centennial Symposium. The events included a panel with nine astronauts, all MIT alumni, and a talk by inventor Elon Musk, cofounder of the company SpaceX, which has built several rockets and whose goal is to fly people to other planets, like Mars. Sending more humans into space was one of the themes of the celebration.

    The AeroAstro department has been at the forefront of aerospace innovation since it started the country’s first aeronautical engineering course in 1914. In 1961, for example, members of the MIT Instrumentation Lab (now the Draper Lab) developed the computer systems for the Apollo program, which made it possible for Neil Armstrong and MIT alumnus Buzz Aldrin to walk on the moon in 1969.

    “[Apollo] became an icon of what we can accomplish through technology,” Ian Waitz, dean of the School of Engineering and a professor of aeronautics and astronautics, told the MIT Spectrum.

    As the aero-astro field has grown to include the study of unmanned aircraft, flexible spaces suits, and small satellites, MIT’s department is more popular than ever. “We’re seeing a 50% increase in our enrollment in the last two years,” said AeroAstro Department Head Jaime Peraire.

    Explore Professor Waitz’s research and Professor Peraire’s research in the Open Access Articles collection in DSpace@MIT, where it is openly accessible to the world.

    Since the MIT faculty established their Open Access Policy in March 2009 they have made thousands of research papers freely available to the world via DSpace@MIT. To highlight that research, we’re offering a series of blog posts that link news stories about scholars’ work to their open access papers in DSpace.

    Download statistics on open access articles now available

    Posted October 24th, 2014 by Ellen Duranceau

    The MIT Libraries have launched a new service offering download data for articles collected under the MIT Faculty Open Access Policy.

    MIT authors can log in and see how many times each of their own papers has been downloaded, and from which countries. Aggregated download numbers are available to anyone inside or outside MIT, including views of download data by department, lab, or center.

    oastats screen shot country map all DLCs

    The service is available at http://oastats.mit.edu.

    We would appreciate feedback from MIT authors about this new service. Please send any comments, suggestions, or questions, to oastats@mit.edu or to:

    Ellen Finnie Duranceau / Program Manager, Scholarly Publishing, Copyright, and Licensing / MIT Libraries

    This news is being shared in celebration of International Open Access Week.

    Second annual Open Access Week table a success

    Posted October 23rd, 2014 by Katharine Dunn

    OA table 2014Nearly 30 students, researchers, and staff stopped by the Office of Scholarly Publishing, Copyright & Licensing (OSPCL) table in Lobby 10 on Wednesday set up to celebrate the eighth international Open Access Week. About two-thirds were MIT undergraduates and grad students who hadn’t previously heard of open access.

    Students who attempted a quiz question won a prize: an MIT Libraries t-shirt or the book Open Access by Peter Suber, a leader of the open access movement. (Other giveaways included MIT Libraries pencils and key chains, OA literature, and Halloween candy.) The most common response to the question, “Where can anyone, anywhere find research articles by MIT authors?” was, resoundingly, “Open Access!” (A good answer, though we were also looking for: DSpace@MIT, the digital repository that houses scholarly articles, theses, and other MIT content.)

    Issues that particularly resonated with students were that increasing journal subscription prices are shutting out large numbers of readers around the world; that open access is way to democratize scientific research; and that through the Faculty Open Access Policy, MIT researchers have made more than 13,000 scholarly articles freely available online.

    This is the second year the OSPCL has run an information table for Open Access Week.

    Readers worldwide benefit from MIT open access articles

    Posted October 22nd, 2014 by Ellen Duranceau

    The MIT faculty established their open access policy as an expression of their commitment “to disseminating the fruits of [their] research and scholarship as widely as possible,” and in the five years since the policy was established, readers have indeed been accessing MIT faculty articles from all around the world.

    oa map oct 1 2010 through sept 2014 from oastats without bottom lines

    Recent comments from readers across the globe reflect the value of this open access:

    Graduate student, Uganda: “I am grateful for making your online information resources freely accessible. I am a graduate student of labour studies and have greatly benefited from your noble generosity.”

    Private researcher, Australia: “[I am] a disabled engineer researching gravity and inertia… My research is hampered by one thing alone, paywalls.”

    Undergraduate student, Brazil:
    “I am most thankful to MIT for freely sharing so many articles, for this attitude not only helps scientific knowledge to be disseminated across the globe,” but it also “inspire[s] those students who, like myself, do not have a chance of paying for many of these publications. MIT is not only sharing knowledge, it is helping those in need on the pursuing of their dreams.”

    Doctor and master’s degree student, Italy: “Your material is precious, thank you very much.”

    Access is important in the US as well. An independent researcher and open source developer in the US comments that he and a colleague researching in the same area “can each make more progress on our own, and collaborate together, more effectively thanks to the availability of a critical article.”

    More reader comments are posted on the scholarly publishing website.

    This news is being shared in celebration of International Open Access Week.

    Downloads of MIT open access articles exceed 2.4 million

    Posted October 22nd, 2014 by Ellen Duranceau

    Downloads of articles in the MIT Open Access Articles Collection, made available under the faculty’s open access policy, now total over 2,460,000.

    Monthly downloads from the collection of 13,700 articles routinely top 90,000, following a new peak of over 101,000 downloads in March of this year.

    oa downloads by month through sept 2014

    These downloads reflect the faculty’s wish, as expressed in their open access policy, to “disseminat[e] the fruits of [their] research and scholarship as widely as possible.”

    This news is being shared in celebration of International Open Access Week.

    New web page summarizes major US research funder open access requirements

    Posted October 17th, 2014 by Ellen Duranceau

    As part of an effort to provide information about new open access requirements that are emerging from the White House Directive on “Expanding Public Access to the Results of Federally Funded Research,” the MIT Libraries will be tracking each agency’s requirements on a new web page.

    screen shot research funder table

    The requirements of the Department of Energy, the first agency to release its Public Access Plan, are included, as are other existing policies, such as the NIH Public Access Policy, as well as the NSF’s existing policy on data management plans.

    doe logo

    US federal agencies with more than $100 Million annually in R&D will be issuing their open access requirements in coming months, and those policies will be summarized on this web page as details become available.

    If you have questions about open access requirements:

  • For publications, contact Ellen Finnie Duranceau, Program Manager, Scholarly Publishing, Copyright, and Licensing, MIT Libraries
  • For data, contact datamanagement@mit.edu.

  • This news is being shared in celebration of International Open Access Week.

    An Open Access Week event: Chemistry societies and open access — new options for authors

    Posted October 17th, 2014 by Ellen Duranceau
    OA speakers

    Pictured above, L to R from top: Professor Christopher Cummins; Jennifer Griffiths, RSC; Mary Yess, ECS; Kevin Davies, ACS

    In honor of International Open Access Week, the MIT Libraries are sponsoring a panel discussion on October 24 which will give authors an opportunity to hear directly from three chemistry societies about their new open access publishing options, and future plans.

    Please join us for this panel:

    Date: October 24, 2014
    Time: 12:00-1:00
    Location: Room 2-105
    Refreshments: a light lunch will be available at 11:45.

    Each of these societies has recently expanded their open access programs, and has announced new ways for authors to make their journal articles openly accessible.

    The panel will be moderated by Steve Gass, Interim Director of Libraries, and will include:

    • Professor of Chemistry Christopher Cummins, who will offer his perspective as an MIT author and Associate Editor for the journal Chemical Science (published by the Royal Society of Chemistry).
    • American Chemical Society: Kevin Davies, VP of business development.
    • Electrochemical Society: Mary Yess, Deputy Executive Director/Chief Content Officer & Publisher.
    • Royal Society of Chemistry: Jennifer Griffiths, Editorial Development Manager for North America.

    Short remarks from each speaker will be followed by a discussion.

    Ellen Finnie Duranceau, Program Manager, Scholarly Publishing, Copyright, and Licensing, MIT Libraries

    OA research in the news: Autism as a disorder of prediction

    Posted October 15th, 2014 by Katharine Dunn
    Pawan Sinha

    Pawan Sinha

    In a paper published this month, MIT researchers suggest that many of the varied symptoms that characterize autism may be explained by a difficulty with making predictions. The ability to predict is fundamental to tasks as diverse as adjusting to sensory stimuli and inferring other’s mental states based on the context. When prediction is compromised, a person lives in a “seemingly ‘magical’ world wherein events occur unexpectedly and without cause,” write the authors, who include professors Pawan Sinha and Richard Held from the Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences. Impaired predictive skills can make the world feel overwhelming and may lead to some of the behaviors linked to autism, such as repetitive behavior or difficulty gauging social situations.

    In devising their hypothesis, the researchers reviewed more than 100 studies and accounts of autism over more than three decades, with the goal of finding a common and coherent basis for the disorder. A new theory of autism could help researchers design to more effective therapies to treat it.

    “At the moment, the treatments that have been developed are driven by the end symptoms. We’re suggesting that the deeper issue is a predictive difficulty, which may, therefore, be a better target for interventions,” says Sinha.

    Explore Professor Sinha’s research in the Open Access Articles collection in DSpace@MIT, where it is openly accessible to the world.

    Since the MIT faculty established their Open Access Policy in March 2009 they have made thousands of research papers freely available to the world via DSpace@MIT. To highlight that research, we’re offering a series of blog posts that link news stories about scholars’ work to their open access papers in DSpace.

    OA research in the news: Study shows “substantial learning” in MOOC

    Posted October 1st, 2014 by Katharine Dunn
    by Ilonka Hebels, licensed under under CC-BY-NC-SA 2.0

    by Ilonka Hebels, licensed under under CC-BY-NC-SA 2.0

    Massive open online courses, or MOOCs, appear to be thriving. Want to hear about the “violent universe” from faculty at the Australian National University? Or take an introductory class on the music business from the renowned Berklee College of Music? These and hundreds of other courses have been offered on platforms like edX, Coursera, or Udacity in the two-and-a-half years since edX ran one of the first MOOCs out of MIT. Enticed by personal or professional edification, as well as the by the cost (free), thousands of people worldwide have signed up for online classes.

    But are MOOC students learning anything?

    This question has been little explored in the online teaching arena. Now, researchers including MIT physics professor David Pritchard, have published a study showing “substantial learning” in an edX MOOC. Using pretest and posttest questions, as well as analyzing homework and test results throughout the course, the researchers found that online students improved as well as or better than those in previously studied traditional classes.

    Explore Professor Pritchard’s research in the Open Access Articles collection in DSpace@MIT, where it is openly accessible to the world.

    Since the MIT faculty established their Open Access Policy in March 2009 they have made thousands of research papers freely available to the world via DSpace@MIT. To highlight that research, we’re offering a series of blog posts that link news stories about scholars’ work to their open access papers in DSpace.

    Chemistry societies and open access: new options for authors

    Posted September 22nd, 2014 by Ellen Duranceau
    OA speakers

    Pictured above, L to R from top: Professor Christopher Cummins; Jennifer Griffiths, RSC; Mary Yess, ECS; Kevin Davies, ACS

    The MIT Libraries are sponsoring a panel discussion on October 24 which will give authors an opportunity to hear directly from three chemistry societies about their new open access publishing options, and future plans.

    Each of these societies has recently expanded their open access programs, and has announced new ways for authors to make their journal articles openly accessible.

    The panel will be moderated by Steve Gass, Interim Director of Libraries, and will include:

    • Professor of Chemistry Christopher Cummins, who will offer his perspective as an MIT author and Associate Editor for the journal Chemical Science (published by the Royal Society of Chemistry).
    • American Chemical Society: Kevin Davies, VP of business development.
    • Electrochemical Society: Mary Yess, Deputy Executive Director/Chief Content Officer & Publisher.
    • Royal Society of Chemistry: Jennifer Griffiths, Editorial Development Manager for North America.

    Short remarks from each speaker will be followed by a discussion.

    Please join us for this panel, held in honor of International Open Access Week:

    Date: October 24, 2014
    Time: 12:00-1:00
    Location: Room 2-105
    Refreshments: a light lunch will be available at 11:45.

    OA research in the news: Bhatia wins Lemelson-MIT Prize

    Posted September 17th, 2014 by Katharine Dunn
    Sangeeta Bhatia

    Sangeeta Bhatia

    Biomedical engineer and professor Sangeeta Bhatia has been awarded the 2014 Lemelson-MIT Prize, worth $500,000, which goes to mid-career inventors with a commitment to mentoring others and bettering the world with their work. Bhatia was cited for building “tiny technologies” in medicine that address complex problems in areas like drug toxicity, tissue regeneration, cancer therapeutics, and infectious disease. Among her inventions is a paper urine test for detecting cancer that has been adapted for use in developing areas.

    Explore Professor Bhatia’s research in the Open Access Articles collection in DSpace@MIT, where it is openly accessible to the world.

    Since the MIT faculty established their Open Access Policy in March 2009 they have made thousands of research papers freely available to the world via DSpace@MIT. To highlight that research, we’re offering a series of blog posts that link news stories about scholars’ work to their open access papers in DSpace.

    OA research in the news: Ebola outbreak linked to funeral

    Posted September 3rd, 2014 by Katharine Dunn

    In a study published last week, researchers including MIT Biology professor Eric Lander show that this year’s explosive Ebola outbreak in West Africa possibly stemmed from the burial of a traditional healer at which 14 women were infected. Scientists sequenced the Ebola virus from 78 patients treated in Sierra Leone and found that the virus for all 78 could be traced to funeral guests. They also determined that the current Ebola strain is genetically distinct from a previous strain circulating elsewhere in Africa. This information could help scientists and public health officials determine which diagnostic tests and drugs may be most effective on the infection. Five authors on the study, all staff members at a hospital in Kenema, Sierra Leone, died of Ebola before the paper was published.

    Explore Professor Lander’s research in the Open Access Articles collection in DSpace@MIT, where it is openly accessible to the world.

    Since the MIT faculty established their Open Access Policy in March 2009 they have made thousands of research papers freely available to the world via DSpace@MIT. To highlight that research, we’re offering a series of blog posts that link news stories about scholars’ work to their open access papers in DSpace.

    New Requirements for DOE-funded Researchers: Public Access to Data and Publications

    Posted August 18th, 2014 by Ellen Duranceau

    In response to the 2013 Memorandum from the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, “Expanding Public Access to the Results of Federally Funded Research,” the Department of Energy (DOE) has issued a Public Access Plan.  The DOE is the first agency to release its open access plan in response to this directive, which applies to the largest federal agencies.

    doe logoThe aim of the directive is to ensure that “the direct results of federally funded scientific research are made available to and useful for the public, industry, and the scientific community.”

    Publications

    Under the DOE plan, researchers will be required to submit accepted manuscripts of publications that report on DOE-supported research to an open access repository such as DSpace@MIT.  Researchers will also need to submit information about their publications to the DOE’s Office of Scientific and Technical Information.   DOE will begin to include these requirements in award agreements as of October 1, 2014.

    Data

    Also under the plan, researchers will be required to include in grant proposals a Data Management Plan outlining how the data generated in research will be shared and preserved.   These requirements take effect October 1, 2014 for the DOE’s Office of Science and by October 1, 2015 for other DOE offices.

    The Libraries can help you comply with these new requirements:

    In coming months, the Libraries will be evaluating what other services may be of help to DOE-funded researchers. If you have comments or suggestions, please contact:

    For publications: contact Ellen Finnie Duranceau, Program Manager, Scholarly Publishing, Copyright, and Licensing, MIT Libraries

    For data: contact the MIT Libraries’ data management team