Subject/Topic areas

OA research in the news: Storms peaking further from tropics

Posted May 28th, 2014 by Katharine Dunn
image from the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

image from the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

A new study coauthored by an MIT faculty member shows that powerful tropical storms are peaking in intensity further away from the equator. The migration of these cyclones, hurricanes, and typhoons is significant in part because residents and infrastructure where the storms now make landfall may be unprepared for them and thus in more danger. As well, the authors write, these cyclones “have an important role in maintaining regional water resources, and a poleward migration of storm tracks could threaten potable water supplies in some regions while increasing flooding events in others.”

While the paper makes a link between the storms’ shift and global warming, coauthor Kerry Emanuel, a professor of atmospheric science in the department of Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences, says that researchers are continuing to examine this. Tropical winds have also expanded towards the poles in recent years. And, Emanuel told the MIT News, “as that belt migrates poleward, which surely it must as the whole ocean warms, the tropical cyclone genesis regions might just move with it. But we have more work to do to nail it down.”

Explore Professor Emanuel’s research in the Open Access Articles collection in DSpace@MIT, where it is openly accessible to the world.

Since the MIT faculty established their Open Access Policy in March 2009 they have made thousands of research papers freely available to the world via DSpace@MIT. To highlight that research, we’re offering a series of blog posts that link news stories about scholars’ work to their open access papers in DSpace.

Taking a trip this summer? We’ve got a guide book for you.

Posted May 21st, 2014 by Heather Denny

Jetting off this summer to some fabulous destination? Or just dreaming of places to go? If so, take a few moments to see if we have a guide book for your vacation spot. We have a Travel Collection in Hayden Library that now circulates for 60 days. This collection has expanded over the last year to include many new countries. Browse the collection, located on the second floor of Hayden near our Browsery, or search the Barton catalog by title.

Guidebooks for places like Africa, China, Italy, Morocco, Japan, Paris, San Francisco, and Washington DC (just to name a few) are already on the shelf. If you’re staying local this summer, we have guides to Boston and New England too.

If we are missing a location, you can suggest we purchase it.

Have questions?  Ask Us!

Two million downloads — a new open access milestone

Posted May 21st, 2014 by Ellen Duranceau

This month the MIT Faculty Open Access Policy hit a new milestone: papers made openly available through the Open Access Articles Collection have been downloaded over 2 million times. Total downloads from the collection of just under 12,000 papers reached 2,012,312 by the end of April, 2014.

This new watershed was reached just one year after celebrating the 1 millionth download — a new peak of one million downloads in one year.

Those are not the only new high water marks: In March, at the fifth anniversary of the faculty’s establishment of the Policy, monthly downloads reached over 100,000 for the first time:

oa downloads by month through april 2014

The downloads originate from across the globe, offering access to grateful readers from many walks of life.

More about the MIT Faculty Open Access Policy:

FAQ about the Policy
Deposit a paper under the Policy

Ellen Finnie Duranceau / Program Manager, Scholarly Publishing, Copyright, and Licensing / MIT Libraries

New! IBISWorld Specialized Industry Reports

Posted May 16th, 2014 by Katherine McNeill

IBISWorld logo

Ever found market research information via the IBISWorld database?  You now have even more!  The Libraries have just expanded our IBISWorld subscription to include their Specialized Industry Reports on niche and emerging industries.

Specialized Industry Reports cover the following industries:

  1. Advisory & financial services
  2. Business franchises
  3. Consumer goods & services (the most extensive category)
  4. Industrial machinery, gas & chemicals
  5. Life sciences
  6. Online retail
  7. Retail market (for selected products)
  8. Specialist engineering, infrastructure & contractors
  9. Technology

The database has approximately 600 Specialized Industry Reports and the collection is continually growing; this new coverage is in addition to their hundreds of in-depth reports on U.S., Chinese, and global industries.   To see the complete list and access the reports, go to IBISWorld.    Under Industry Market Research, select U.S. Specialized Industry Reports.

OA research in the news: The structure of onscreen feelings

Posted May 14th, 2014 by Katharine Dunn

The-Forms-of-the-AffectsCan lines, shapes, and colors express emotions in movies? In her new book, “The Forms of the Affects,” literature professor Eugenie Brinkema closely looks at these properties in films like “Psycho” and “Open Water” and argues that they do. In her view, emotions or “affect” need not only be observed by watching characters embody a feeling like anxiety or grief. Rather, Brinkema says that formal properties like repetition, duration, and lighting show the emotion themselves.

Take the film “Open Water,” in which a husband and wife are accidentally left behind in shark-infested waters during a scuba diving trip. The movie is frightening and anxiety producing, in part, says Brinkema, because of its visual frame. Most scenes show the sea and the sky with a horizontal line between them. As time goes on in the film, that line is interrupted by shark fins above and bodies disappearing below.

“The commonplace assumption is that spectators pay money to go to horror films because it will make us feel anxious, and then we cathartically leave the theater at the end of the day and feel fine. But what if [the film’s] anxiety has to do with the specific visual form of movement and time?” Brinkema told the MIT News.

Explore Professor Brinkema’s research in the Open Access Articles collection in DSpace@MIT, where it is openly accessible to the world. Brinkema also has a newly published course on MIT OpenCourseWare.

Since the MIT faculty established their Open Access Policy in March 2009 they have made thousands of research papers freely available to the world via DSpace@MIT. To highlight that research, we’re offering a series of blog posts that link news stories about scholars’ work to their open access papers in DSpace.

RSC, ACS offer new open access options for authors

Posted May 14th, 2014 by Katharine Dunn

In the last year, two major chemistry publishers have expanded their open access options.

The Royal Society of Chemistry continues to offer its “Gold for Gold” vouchers, launched in 2013, which allow authors to publish their otherwise “closed” articles as open access articles without charge. The Libraries receive a limited number of vouchers based on the cost of providing RSC journals at MIT, and we distribute them on a first-come, first-served basis. If you have an article in the RSC publication process now and would like to make it open access at no cost, email rscvouchers@mit.edu with your name, the title of your article, and the RSC journal you’re publishing in.

The American Chemical Society recently announced a new series of open access options for authors that include an open access journal, more flexible reuse licenses for articles, and, for the rest of 2014, free deposits of NIH-funded ACS articles to PubMed Central.

There are four main components to the ACS open access program:

  •  ACS Central Science, an open access, peer-reviewed journal to launch later this year, will publish 100-200 articles annually across the chemical sciences. There will be no subscription fees to read the articles, nor any author processing charges to publish in the journal unless authors want to distribute articles under a Creative Commons license. CC licenses allow authors to modify their copyright terms so that other people can use, share, or even build upon a work, depending on the license authors choose. Authors can distribute ACS Central Science articles under a Creative Commons Attribution license for a fee of $500 for ACS members and $1000 for non-members in 2014.
  • ACS AuthorChoice, in which authors pay a fee to make articles open access, has been available to authors for several years. In 2014 ACS expanded it so that authors can now choose immediate or 12-month embargoed (AuthorChoice+12) open access. Other changes include:
    • For NIH-funded authors: In 2014 ACS is giving authors a free AuthorChoice+12 license and will deposit the ACS version of record to PubMed Central on their behalf. Authors need to acknowledge NIH funding when they publish. Starting in 2015, authors will need to pay for a PMC deposit of the ACS version unless they use Author Rewards (see below).

      Note: There is never a charge for authors to deposit their final manuscripts to PMC themselves.
    • Authors can now choose one of three licenses when they pay for AuthorChoice or AuthorChoice+12: the standard ACS AuthorChoice license or one of two Creative Commons licenses. There are additional fees for the CC licenses.
  • ACS Author Rewards: The corresponding author of each ACS article published in 2014 will receive two credits of $750 that can be used (individually or combined) to offset charges to make new or previously published articles open access. The Author Rewards must be used by the end of 2017, and the eligible corresponding author can transfer credits to co-authors or other colleagues.
  • ACS Editor’s Choice: Each day, ACS makes one newly published, peer-reviewed article openly available to highlight work of public interest. The chosen articles can be read for free, and their authors receive ACS AuthorChoice publishing licenses for no fee.

For more information or to offer feedback on these options:

RSC’s Gold for Gold FAQ

ACS’s Open Access Initiatives FAQ

Erja Kajosalo, Chemistry & Chemical Engineering Librarian

Katharine Dunn, Scholarly Communications Librarian

New resources: Check out the Cochrane Library & Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

Posted May 13th, 2014 by Barbara Williams

The Cochrane Library is a collection of databases that contain high quality independent evidence to inform healthcare decision-making, bringing together research on effective treatments and interventions. Published since 1996, the Cochrane Library contains over 5,000 reviews and 2,000 protocols.

Cochrane

The Cochrane Library contains:

  • Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews
  • Cochrane Central Registry of Controlled Trials
  • Cochrane Methodology Register
  • Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects
  • Health Technology Assessment Database
  • NHS Economic Evaluation Database

The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, contains highly regarded systematic reviews on treatment efficacy for specific diseases interventions and provide a summary of the results of research gathered from randomized controlled trials found in the literature.

You can browse the Cochrane Library or you can search by specific disease or intervention and limit to reviews.

Questions? Email Courtney Crummett, the Bioinformatics and Biosciences Librarian.

Share your research data with openICPSR—free for a limited time!

Posted May 12th, 2014 by Katherine McNeill

openICPSR logo

Need to share research data you have collected in the social or behavioral sciences?  Have a funding agency that requires you to make your data publicly available?  Share your data through openICPSR!

A service of the ICPSR data archive, openICPSR is a research data sharing service for the social and behavioral sciences which provides:

  • Distribution through an established network of over 740 research institutions with powerful search tools and search engine indexing, enabling your data to be discovered and cited
  • Reliability of a trusted, sustainable organization with over 50 years’ experience storing research data
  • Review by professional data curators
  • The ability to accept and disseminate sensitive or restricted-use data

In order to make your data publicly available to others, openICPSR charges a deposit fee (different levels of service are available).  Normally this cost would be written into a grant proposal when planning your data management.  But if you have data right now to share, for a limited time through the end of the calendar year, you can self-deposit your data in openICPSR with no fee!

For more information:

  • For assistance in preparing your data for deposit in ICPSR for free this year, contact data-management@mit.edu.
  • For more information on all your options for depositing data with ICPSR, including professional data curation, contact deposit@icpsr.umich.edu.
  • Working on other issues related to data management or sharing?  Looking for a way to share data from other disciplines?  We can help!  Find out more about the Libraries’ data management services.

Information Processing Letters: The complete package

Posted May 5th, 2014 by Barbara Williams

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Information Processing Letters
 is now available.

The MIT Libraries now subscribe to current, as well as historical issues, of Information Processing Letters.

Information Processing Letters is a forum for disseminating new research on information processing in a timely way.

Please send questions or comments to Amy Stout, EECS Librarian, astout@mit.edu.

Discovering the Libraries: Student jobs

Posted May 1st, 2014 by Pritee Tembhekar

By MIT Libraries’ student blogger, Pri Tembhekar

Hello everyone!

I’ve spent quite a few posts now describing resources offered by the Libraries. This week is about a resource that jumps off the page all by itself: money. The Libraries offer a range of paid positions for student workers, including jobs during the summer and IAP. Full information can be found at the student jobs page.

Jobs come in three major flavors. The first and most visible is circulation. These students may have helped you get books you reserved or check out materials. They also work to open and close the library and re-shelve books. Other responsibilities include answering questions, checking the shelves to make sure the materials are correctly placed and accessible, and retrieving materials from the stacks. The second is clerical. Fairly self-explanatory, this position includes ordering materials, stamping books, managing spreadsheets, sorting materials, and special projects like managing digital collections. Finally, students can also do storage and project work. The specifics of this job often depend on what is needed in the Libraries. That might be looking for books, applying barcodes, moving materials into storage, and helping with circulation and clerical duties. To get started you’ll need to identify the job you want, have at least some sense of your schedule, apply online, and  fill out an I-9. One of the major advantages of these jobs, in addition to being paid, is the opportunity to work in a peaceful, beautiful space surrounded by books. To get an insider’s perspective, I interviewed Rebecca Navarro and Kaylee Brent on their experiences.

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Rebecca working at the Lewis Music Library.

Name: Rebecca Navarro

Year: 2014

Course: 16

Job and tenure: Circulation at Lewis Music Library, four years

Hours per week: I’m one of the crazy ones so I work between 12 and 20 hours each week. But it’s easy to get more or fewer hours.

Highlights of the job: I like the relaxed environment. I love the staff. They are really knowledgeable. Working at the music library has also given me an opportunity to continue to pursue music. My concentration is music and I’m really interested in it. The composer forums, open mics,  live concerts, and other cool events bring music to me. I get to learn more about music and keep that passion alive.

Reasons for working at the Libraries:  Honestly as a freshman it was because I needed a job for the money. I live in senior house so I actually know the music library exists. Reasons for continuing were that I love the staff that I work for. They are really accommodating. During finals week they allow for more downtime so that I can study but they also give me assignments when I’m bored.

Learnings on the job: I have learned how to use Barton, how to research properly at the library. I have also learned how accessible the staff is, even for obscure questions.

Take-away message: Don’t be afraid to ask for something you need. I see so many people struggling to find something that they could have found in a few minutes with my help, or the help of the staff.

 

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Kaylee in the Dewey Library staff room.

Name: Kaylee Brent

Year: 2016

Course: 12

Job and tenure: Circulation at Dewey Library, two years

Hours per week: About 10 hours a week.

Highlights of the job: I like that it is pretty easy work and that it is fairly flexible. I get to listen to music when I’m in the stacks. When I’m working at desk I can do some homework during downtime. I’ve also found out about some great resources.

Reasons for working at the Libraries:  I needed money. I’ve worked a bunch of different jobs at MIT. This is low stress and reasonable. I have gotten to the point where generally people see me as competent. They are comfortable with giving me more control of the library. I don’t have to ask questions all the time.

Learnings on the job: I have learned how useful course reserves are! I haven’t bought a textbook in a while because I can use them for free in the libraries.

Take-away message: You should act in the first week of term to maximize opportunity for jobs. It varies by library what your responsibilities are.

OA research in the news: New building will house nanoscale research

Posted April 30th, 2014 by Katharine Dunn

NewsImage_MITnano-3Starting in summer 2015, construction will begin on a 200,000-square-foot building called “MIT.nano” that will replace Building 12 on the MIT campus. The building, to be completed by 2018, will include cutting edge facilities to support research with nanoscale materials and processes. About one quarter of MIT’s graduate students and 20 percent of its researchers across many fields will make use of the facility, according to Vladimir Bulović, an electrical engineering professor and the faculty lead on the MIT.nano project.

“This building needs to be centrally located, because nanoscale research is now central to so many disciplines,” Bulović told the MIT News. “[It] was designed to encourage collaboration.”

Explore Professor Bulović’s research in the Open Access Articles collection in DSpace@MIT, where it is openly accessible to the world.

Since the MIT faculty established their Open Access Policy in March 2009 they have made thousands of research papers freely available to the world via DSpace@MIT. To highlight that research, we’re offering a series of blog posts that link news stories about scholars’ work to their open access papers in DSpace.

MIT Libraries launches online Fair Use Quiz for students

Posted April 29th, 2014 by Katharine Dunn

fairusequizThe MIT Libraries’ Office of Scholarly Publishing, Copyright, and Licensing has launched an online Fair Use Quiz to help students better understand the core concepts of copyright law’s “fair use” provision, the flexible — but notably ambiguous — exception under US copyright law that makes it possible to use others’ copyrighted works without permission. The aim of the quiz is to put information about fair use in the hands of students and empower them to make informed decisions about using copyrighted works.

The self-guided quiz, which also covers the basics of copyright and addresses website “terms of use,” takes only about 10 minutes to complete. It walks through four cases, including use of images and data in several scenarios.

The quiz can help students answer questions such as whether it’s possible to use a figure from a scholarly journal in a thesis, or whether a particular image can be uploaded to a class blog. Is there one correct answer for these questions? Probably not: Applying fair use can be complex, but the quiz attempts to give students the tools to make their own assessments.

Earlier this year, we got feedback from undergraduate and graduate students on a beta version of the quiz and adapted it accordingly. If you have any comments, please email copyright-lib@mit.edu, or contact any of the staff in the Office of Scholarly Publishing, Copyright, and Licensing. We would very much appreciate hearing from you.


New energy journals in the house

Posted April 28th, 2014 by Chris Sherratt

Energy is a fast moving topic at MIT and all over the world. We’re pleased to have added three new online journal subscriptions to our energy portfolio:

Whether you browse them online, create email or RSS alerts to new issues and content, or find references through our energy databases, we hope these additional journals enhance your energy information experience.

Ask Us! Or find more resources here:  http://libguides.mit.edu/energy

MIT’s Monuments Men

Posted April 28th, 2014 by Nora Murphy

We are pleased to note that MIT alumni served with the World War II “Monuments Men” to save cultural treasures. Here is information about two of them.

Joseph “Paul” Gardner

PaulGardner_fold3

Photo credit: Fold 3 by Ancestry

According to sources in MIT Institute Archives and Special Collections Joseph Paul Gardner was born on October 20, 1894.

Prior to coming to MIT he attended Somerville High School. He attended MIT from 1913-1917, and took courses in architecture (course 4). Gardner did not receive a degree from MIT, but was considered to be part of the class of 1917. While at MIT, he was a member of Delta Kappa Epsilon and the Architectural Society. He also participated in the Tech Show, where he was described as chief ballet dancer.

Images of Mr. Gardner’s involvement in the Tech Show can be found in the 1915-1918 editions of Technique. Gardner pictured above with the troupe from 1916. (Technique, 1916).

After leaving MIT, Gardner joined the Coast Artillery Corps and served during World War I. He received the rank of 1st Lieutenant of August 9, 1917, and would be promoted to Captain on March 5, 1918. From September 3 to November 26, 1917, he was in the Officers’ Training Camp at Ft. Monroe, Virginia. He served in the American Expeditionary Forces from December 11, 1917 to July 17, 1919. He was at the Heavy Artillery School in Mailly-le-Camp in January 15, 1918. During April he was assigned special duty with the Heavy Artillery Board designing trains for Railway Artillery. From April 25 to November 8, 1918, he was in command of Battery H, 53rd Artillery, Coast Artillery Corps at front in Champagne Sector. While in command, he participated in the Champagne-Marne Defensive and the Meuse-Argonne Offensive. After the armistice, he was stationed at Le Mans Embarkation Center. He was awarded the Croix de Guerre with Palm and Fourragère for the promptness of his unit to return fire while under bombardment by shrapnel and gas shells at age twenty-one. At the end of the war, he traveled Europe studying architecture.

Gardner became the Ballet Master for the Washington Opera Company and the co-owner of the Tchernikoff Gardner School of Dancing. He also spent nine years as a dancer with Anna Pavlova’s Ballet Company. During this time, he received his Bachelor’s of Art in European history from George Washington University, graduating in 1928.

It is unclear what occupation he held after returning from Europe. The 1920 Alumni Directory lists his address as Los Angeles, California, but no occupation is given. By 1925, he had relocated to Washington, DC. In 1929 he received an MA from George Washington University. In 1930 he decided to focus on art, and attended doctoral classes at Harvard’s Fogg Art Museum in order to prepare himself for museum work, completing his studies in 1932. He became the assistant to the Trustees of the William Rockhill Nelson Trust in March of that year and was appointed as first Director of the William Rockhill Nelson Gallery of Art and Mary Atkins Museum of Fine Arts in 1933. In 1932, he was involved with the creation of a new art museum in Kansas City Missouri. The following year he was appointed director of this museum, the William Rockhill Nelson Gallery of Art (now the Nelson Atkins Museum of Art) in Kansas City, Missouri where he would work until his retirement in 1955.

Gardner_Paul_MMF

Photo credit: Monuments Men Foundation

During World War II, he served in the US Army, where he achieved the rank of Lieutenant Colonel. He served in the Military intelligence Service on the Sub-commission for Monuments and Fine Art in Italy. From 1942 to 1945 he also served as the Military Governor of Ischia, an Italian island in the Mediterranean Sea. In October 1943, he was the lone MFAA officer to arrive to the ruins of Naples after many delays and difficulties. He served during World War II as a Lieutenant Colonel in command of the MFAA in Italy. From 1942 to 1945 he also served as the Military Governor of Ischia, an Italian island in the Mediterranean Sea. In October 1943, he was the lone MFAA officer to arrive to the ruins of Naples after many delays and difficulties. The 1955 edition of the Alumni Directory lists his address was given as Las Milpas, San Patricio, New Mexico. After the war he returned to the museum until resigning as Director in May 1953. For the last nineteen years of his life he spent his summers on his ranch in New Mexico, and his winters in Italy. Gardner died in Lincoln, New Mexico on September 11, 1972.

Robert Edsel’s book Saving Italy discusses the heroism of former Nelson-Atkins director Paul Gardner. Edsel created the Monuments Men Foundation for the Preservation of Art, which honors the legacy of the Monuments Men.

Photo credit: Monuments Men Foundation

 

Sidney Biehler Waugh

Sidney Biehler Waugh was born on January 17, 1904. He attended Amherst High School prior to coming to MIT, and his address on entrance was MAC Campus, Amherst, Massachusetts. Waugh attended MIT from 1921 to 1923, and during 1925, taking courses in architecture (course 4). While at MIT, he was a member of the Architectural Society and the Kappa Sigma fraternity.

waughsharp
In 1929, Mr. Waugh won the Prix de Rome for his sculpture “Steel.” An image of this sculpture can be found in Technology Review vol. 31, p. 480. As of 1933, he began to produce designs for Steuben Glass.

Images of his glass works can be found in Technology Review (vol. 38, p. 339, and vol 40, p. 66) and the Corning Museum of Glass collection online. In 1934, he had the prize exhibit in a salon devoted to American-made glass. Around this time, he became involved with MIT again, serving on the Visiting Committee for Architecture from 1935-1940, with the exception of the 1937/1938 term. In 1937, he would design a glass medal for a competition sponsored by the Pittsburgh Glass Institute. Mr. Waugh created both a sculpture and fountain that was exhibited in front of the Maritime Building in the NY World’s Fair in 1939.

The 1948 directory states that he served as a captain in the US Army during World War II. For his service he was awarded the Silver Star, Bronze Star, and Croix de Guerre (twice), and named a Knight of the Crown of Italy. He joined National Sculpture Society in 1930 and was elected president in 1948.

He wrote two books: The Art of Glassmaking in 1938 and The Making of Fine Glass in 1947.

In 1957 Waugh designed the Atoms for Peace gold medal. A folder on Sidney Waugh can be found in the Atoms for Peace Awards records (MC10, b.3) in the MIT Institute Archives and Special Collections.

Sidney Waugh died on June 30, 1963. He had been a member of the National Institute of Arts and Sciences.

Thank you to Sony Pictures for providing a copy of “The Monuments Men, starring George Clooney, Matt Damon, and John Goodman, before its DVD/Blu-ray release on May 20th. The free screening will be shown to the MIT and Harvard students as a part of National Preservation Week celebrations. The film is based on the book The Monuments Men: Allied Heroes, Nazi Thieves and the Greatest Treasure Hunt in History by Robert M. Edsel. MIT students will have a chance to win a signed copy of the Edsel’s book at the Movie showing on April 29th. Thank you also to the Monuments Men Foundation.

Thank you to Christina Tanguay, Kate Beattie, and Jana Dambrogio for researching and co-writing this blog post.

Poetry in the Archives

Posted April 24th, 2014 by Nora Murphy

For National Poetry Month, a poem from MIT faculty papers housed in the Institute Archives and Special Collections.

ChromosomeSmall“Ode to a Chromosome,” found in the papers of biologist Francis Otto Schmitt, is one of the poems we came across recently. Poetry in scientific and engineering collections is an unexpected treat. The poetic inclinations of members of the MIT community, from limericks to sonnets, can be found throughout the collections. Early issues of The Tech and Technique are filled with verse.  Some verses are flowery, many are amusing, some reference MIT, and the theme of others is more broadly scientific. Some of the works are good and others not so good, depending on your poetic sensibilities.

MIT has spawned a number of poets, among them Frank Gelett Burgess, class of 1887, whose nonsense verse “Purple Cow: Reflections on a Mythic Beast Who’s Quite Remarkable, at Least” brought him fame but also frustration that it was the verse for which he was best known.

Discussion about the place of the humanities at MIT has been recurring since the establishment of the Institute in 1861. A 2010 editorial in The Tech by graduate student Emily Ruppel (“MIT – poetry = a travesty”) and a subsequent blog by John Lundberg for the Huffington Post (“Should MIT Teach Poetry?“) reflect on the value of poetry in a scientific and engineering community.

Contact the Institute Archives and Special Collections to find out more about poems and other research material created by the MIT community.

 

The art and science of letterlocking

Posted April 24th, 2014 by Heather Denny

Jana Dambrogio, MIT Libraries’ Thomas F. Peterson Conservator
(Photo: L. Barry Hetherington)

Long before email, text, and instant message, important words were passed discreetly from closed palm to palm with a knowing glance and nod. These hand-written notes were often elaborately folded, sealed with wax, and rigged with anti-tamper devices to ensure their protection and authenticity.

The technique of “locking” letters involves folding the parchment, papyrus, or paper securely so that the letter functions as its own envelope. Well-known historical figures such as Queen Elizabeth I of England, Marie Antoinette, and even MIT’s founder, William Barton Rogers, used locked letters for their private communications.

“Letterlocking has been around for centuries, and has been used by prominent figures as well as everyday people,” says Jana Dambrogio, MIT Libraries’ Thomas F. Peterson Conservator. “Some of the earliest examples on paper are found in the Vatican Secret Archives and date back to 1494.”

Dambrogio, who is the conservator of MIT’s rare books, archives, and manuscripts, will demonstrate the technique of locking letters in two upcoming events at MIT: Historic Letterlocking: the Art, Technology and Secrecy of Letter Writing on April 23 during the Cambridge Science Festival, and April 29 during MIT Libraries’ Preservation Week. Read the full article on MIT News.

Cite your data sources!

Posted April 23rd, 2014 by Katherine McNeill

citation needed sign    data

You’re familiar with the importance of citing the literature that you use in your paper.  But did you know that it’s equally important to cite the sources of the data that you use?

Authors don’t always rigorously cite their data sources—have you ever had a hard time finding the data underlying a publication?—but citing data is equally important in order to:

  • Give the data producer appropriate credit
  • Enable readers of your work to access the data, for their own use and to replicate your results
  • Fulfill publisher requirements

Need guidance and examples?  See the Libraries guide to citing data.  For help in citing data—or in identifying sources of data behind publications—contact Katherine McNeill, Social Science Data Services Librarian, mcneillh@mit.edu.

Want to know more about improved standards and practices in the field for data citation?  See:

Image credits: futureatlas.com [CC-BY-2.0], infocux Technologies [CC-BY-NC-2.0]

Discovering the Libraries: Enriching and simplifying research

Posted April 23rd, 2014 by Pritee Tembhekar
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Priya Kalluri, ’16, doing research on several generations of Frankenstein adaptations, using MIT Libraries’ resources.

By MIT Libraries’ student blogger, Pri Tembhekar

Hello everyone! It is research season! Well at least many of us have design projects, theses, or final reports that require significant research. This week I’ll be highlighting some of the Libraries’ resources for research. You probably already know about finding print resources, such as books owned by the MIT Libraries. While this is a good first step, there are many additional sources of information that can add depth and breadth to your findings.

Subject matter experts are part of the Libraries’ staff and have specialized knowledge about subjects ranging from accounting to women’s and gender studies. These experts can provide research consultations for courses, theses, and other in-depth research. These consultations can be very valuable if you come prepared, and with a project that isn’t due in the next two hours. In case you are facing an impending deadline, these subject matter experts have kindly put together subject matter guides. For an example of how these can be used, take the one on energy. The experts have provided a list of easily accessible databases and journals along with short descriptions of their contents. This enables students to produce higher quality research than Google alone can facilitate. The guides are also a direct way to utilize MIT-only resources without much research into which resources are available and relevant. In short, some of the leg work has been done for you! For a particularly fun research guide, check out the one on designing and making stuff.

Along the same lines as the research guides, the Libraries provide class guides. Certain classes require substantial outside material and/or research from students. The professors can work with librarians to put together class guides especially usefully for that class. If your research is for a class, it is worth checking if there is a class guide for it. In my case, the guide for 10.27 (Energy Projects Lab) along with the Energy guide mentioned above and the Chemical Engineering guide were the foundation for preparing a meaty introduction to my final report in 10.27.

Finally, one of the simplest resources is a class textbook. The Libraries provide access to select textbooks online. I never thought to search for textbooks in the library until a friend mentioned last year that he wasn’t buying the textbook because he could access it through the Libraries. This is also useful if you find that you need a textbook for a class you aren’t taking or would like to peruse the textbook for a class you might take. Never hurts to look before you buy!

Last open mic this semester – Friday, May 2

Posted April 23rd, 2014 by Christie Moore

pianoJoin us for the final open mic this semester in the Lewis Music Library, one last chance to try out the new piano. Come jam, perform, or just listen. Everyone welcome. Bring your own music or use the library’s (we’ve got lots!).

Date: Friday, May 2, 2014
Place: Lewis Music Library, Bldg. 14E-109
Time: noon- 1 pm
Refreshments provided

Composer Florian Hollerweger: Thursday, May 1

Posted April 23rd, 2014 by Christie Moore

Composer forum series: Florian Hollerweger

revolution_florianThe Revolution is Hear! Sound Art, the Everyday, and Aural Awareness.

Date: Thursday, May 1, 2014
Place: Lewis Music Library, Bldg. 14E-109
Time: 5-6 pm
Reception follows
Free and open to the public

Sponsored by MIT Music and Theater Arts.

Try Inspec for computer science, electrical engineering, & more

Posted April 18th, 2014 by Barbara Williams

Still the #1 database for research literature in computer science, electrical engineering, and applied physics!

Inspec:

  • Covers material from 1896 to the present
  • Tells you who the top researchers are in each discipline and sub-discipline
  • Contains citations and links to journal articles, conference papers, and books
  • Links to related literature in business, psychology, and design

Try searching Inspec for a computer science, electrical engineering, or applied physics topic you’ve been researching or reading about lately. If you do, please let me know what you think or what you find!

Questions? Ask Amy Stout, Librarian for EECS.

EI

MIT Earth Week: The Clean Bin Project Film Screening & Panel Discussion

Posted April 18th, 2014 by Heather McCann

 

CBP Poster

 

Time: Thursday, April 24th, 6-8:30 pm

Location: 3-270

Is it possible to live completely waste free? In this multi-award winning, festival favorite, partners Jen and Grant go head to head in a competition to see who can swear off consumerism and produce the least garbage Their light-hearted competition is set against a darker examination of the problem waste.

Afterwards, join MIT community members for a discussion of living waste free.

Snacks will be provided.

Sponsored by MIT Libraries and the Earth Day Collaborative

Learn more about Mendeley–with pizza!

Posted April 17th, 2014 by Katherine McNeill

Mendeley logo

Meet Mendeley Representatives–Refreshments served!

When: Friday April 25th 3:30-5pm

Where: 14N-132

Come eat pizza and learn more about Mendeley, a tool that helps you manage and share pdfs and easily generate citations and bibliographies when writing.  Representatives from Mendeley,  MIT Mendeley Advisors and library staff will be on hand to meet you, answer your questions and get feedback on this great tool.

RSVP for the event.

Enhanced Mendeley Access for MIT Users

The MIT Libraries has purchased Mendeley Institutional Edition for the MIT community.  This gives MIT users more personal and shared space than what is available with a free Mendeley account.  To find out more see our Mendeley page.

Questions? Email personal-content@mit.edu

Electroacoustics for lunch – Monday, April 28

Posted April 17th, 2014 by Christie Moore

electroacoustic-flyer_medJoin us for a lunchtime performance by MIT’s Florian Hollerweger (Music and Theater Arts) and Forrest Larson (Lewis Music Library) as they explore acoustic and electronic sounds of ethereal and earthbound origins in a new collaboration.

Date: Monday, April 28, 2014
Place: Lewis Music Library, Bldg. 14E-109
Time: noon – 1 pm
Reception follows
Free and open to the public

Guardians of the MIT Community

Posted April 16th, 2014 by Nora Murphy
BicyclePatroljpg

Barbara Haven, Raymond Roberts, and Robert Molino

Security on MIT’s campus has evolved since the 1950s when night watchmen, serving primarily as fire watch, patrolled the campus. The responsibilities, duties, and reporting structure of the police have changed with the times and the needs of the community. Crimes on campus previously handled by Cambridge police were taken on by MIT’s force in 1959. Over the last two decades the MIT Police have worked with students and staff more collaboratively on safety issues. Read more about the history of the MIT Police on the Institute Archives and Special Collections web site.

OA research in the news: Germs that go to great lengths

Posted April 16th, 2014 by Katharine Dunn
by 729:512. CC-BY-NC https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.0/

“Sneeze vector” by 729:512. CC-BY-NC license https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.0/

A new study by MIT researchers shows that the droplets our noses and mouths release during coughs and sneezes can travel much further than previously thought. John Bush, a professor of applied mathematics, and Lydia Bourouiba, an assistant professor in the department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, are two of the coauthors on a recent paper, “Violent expiratory events: on coughing and sneezing.”  The researchers directly observed sneezing and coughing, and also simulated it in the lab, and found that coughs and sneezes produce “turbulent buoyant momentum puffs,” or respiratory clouds, that can carry potentially infected droplets five to 200 times further than known before. This could mean airborne pathogens are more easily transmitted through ventilation systems and enclosed spaces.

Explore Professor Bush’s research and Professor Bourouiba’s research in the Open Access Articles collection in DSpace@MIT, where it is openly accessible to the world.

Since the MIT faculty established their Open Access Policy in March 2009 they have made thousands of research papers freely available to the world via DSpace@MIT. To highlight that research, we’re offering a series of blog posts that link news stories about scholars’ work to their open access papers in DSpace.

More E-books now available from Wiley Online Library

Posted April 15th, 2014 by Barbara Williams

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You keep telling us you want more e-books and we aim to please. The Libraries are pleased to announce a cooperative pilot project with Wiley Online Library. Beginning now for one year, about 15,000 electronic books published by Wiley will be available to the MIT community. After this pilot we will purchase perpetual access to books with significant use. (Note some textbooks, extensive encyclopedias and/or handbooks might not be available). This project will also help us determine how to provide access to major STEM e-books in the most cost efficient way.

Soon the links to these books will appear in Barton, but now you may visit the Wiley Online Library.

To read these on your e-book device see our E-reading FAQ.

Happy reading, and Tell Us what you think!

Climate Change volumes now online

Posted April 11th, 2014 by Chris Sherratt

Many will already be aware that Dr. James Hansen, one of the most prominent voices in the climate change conversation, visits our campus next week. In honor of his visit, the Libraries would like to highlight the new, five volume online resource, Climate Vulnerability: understanding and addressing threats to essential resources.

It would be difficult to find an aspect of this challenging topic not addressed in this collection of essays. Well referenced and written by experts, the articles explore the vulnerability of human health, food resources, energy, ecosystems and water to our climate and its changes. They address science, policy, economics and social ramifications of these changes in the world around us.temperature_gis_2012We hope you explore!  Image credit: NASA

 

Community Archives in the Digital Era: Creating the South Asian American Digital Archive

Posted April 11th, 2014 by Mark Szarko
Samip Mallick

Samip Mallick

Desis Rising Up and Moving (DRUM)

Please join the MIT Libraries for a discussion with Samip Mallick, co-founder and Executive Director of The South Asian American Digital Archive (SAADA). SAADA works nationally to give voice to South Asian Americans by documenting, preserving, and sharing stories that reflect their diverse experiences.

Mallick will share stories from the archive and SAADA’s unique approach to documenting and preserving community history. The discussion will be moderated by Professor Vivek Bald of MIT Comparative Media Studies/Writing.

SAADAphoto2

Photograph of Vaishno Das Bagai, pictured in a general store. Courtesy of Rani Bagai

 

 

 

Founded in 2008, SAADA has built a digital archive of over 1600 items, and through outreach and educational programming has raised awareness about the rich histories of South Asians in the United States.

Refreshments will be served.

Date: Wednesday, April 30, 2014
Place: 2-105
Time: 4:00-6:00pm
4-4:30: refreshments
4:30-6:00: talk followed by Q&A

The event is free and open to the public. For more information, contact: Michelle Baildon baildon@mit.edu

Additional support is provided by the MIT Asian Pacific American Employee Resource Group, the Center for Bilingual/Bicultural StudiesMIT India, and MIT’s programs in Comparative Media Studies/Writing and History.

“Be Thou the Advocate…”

Posted April 10th, 2014 by Nora Murphy

Happy Charter Day, MIT!

Letter from Governor Andrew to William Barton Rogers, 9 March 1861

On this day, 153 years ago, the Massachusetts legislature passed, and Governor John Andrew approved, legislation that established MIT.

On March 9, 1861, Governor Andrew had written to William Barton Rogers that a meeting had been scheduled with the State Board of Education to afford an opportunity for proponents of the plan to explain its advantages for education and industry. The letter reproduced here expresses the governor’s confidence in Rogers’s dynamic personality and powers of persuasion.

Rogers had worked long and hard to establish a polytechnic school in Boston, spending years sharing his vision and soliciting support. Two days later the U.S. Civil War began when Confederate soldiers fired upon Fort Sumter. MIT’s first classes were not held until 1865, shortly before the end of the war.

More information about the establishment of MIT is available on the  Institute Archives and Special Collections web site. MIT’s original charter is housed at the Massachusetts Archives among the acts and resolves of the Commonwealth.