Subject/Topic areas

OA research in the news: Autism as a disorder of prediction

Posted October 15th, 2014 by Katharine Dunn
Pawan Sinha

Pawan Sinha

In a paper published this month, MIT researchers suggest that many of the varied symptoms that characterize autism may be explained by a difficulty with making predictions. The ability to predict is fundamental to tasks as diverse as adjusting to sensory stimuli and inferring other’s mental states based on the context. When prediction is compromised, a person lives in a “seemingly ‘magical’ world wherein events occur unexpectedly and without cause,” write the authors, who include professors Pawan Sinha and Richard Held from the Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences. Impaired predictive skills can make the world feel overwhelming and may lead to some of the behaviors linked to autism, such as repetitive behavior or difficulty gauging social situations.

In devising their hypothesis, the researchers reviewed more than 100 studies and accounts of autism over more than three decades, with the goal of finding a common and coherent basis for the disorder. A new theory of autism could help researchers design to more effective therapies to treat it.

“At the moment, the treatments that have been developed are driven by the end symptoms. We’re suggesting that the deeper issue is a predictive difficulty, which may, therefore, be a better target for interventions,” says Sinha.

Explore Professor Sinha’s research in the Open Access Articles collection in DSpace@MIT, where it is openly accessible to the world.

Since the MIT faculty established their Open Access Policy in March 2009 they have made thousands of research papers freely available to the world via DSpace@MIT. To highlight that research, we’re offering a series of blog posts that link news stories about scholars’ work to their open access papers in DSpace.

The Springer Book Archive (SBA) is here!

Posted October 14th, 2014 by Chris Sherratt

springer

You may know that for several years, MIT Libraries has had online books (2005+) from the prolific publisher Springer. Now we are pleased to announce the addition of approximately 47,320 more e-books across all fields of engineering, math, physics, life sciences, social sciences and more…through Springerlink!

Most of the titles in SBA were published between 1980 and 2005, but it does include some older books, such as Very’s Prize Essay on the Distribution of the Moon’s Heat and its Variation with the Phase (1891) and Economics Aspects of Immigration (1954). And, as before, you can still download chapters or whole books; great for a community on the go.

Another great service available to MIT is Springer’s MyCopy: a chance to buy a sturdy paperbound copy of a book for $24.99 regardless of the current price: Bargains!

Contact Michael Noga for further information, and enjoy your new access to older Springer books!

authors@mit reading by Ellen Harris

Posted October 8th, 2014 by Patsy Baudoin

*Handel_ok jacket.inddCome hear Ellen Harris read from and discuss her latest book, George Frideric Handel: A Life with Friends, published just this month by W. W. Norton & Company.

Ellen T. Harris, professor emerita at MIT, formerly the Class of 1949 Professor of Music, was MIT’s first associate provost for the arts. She is an internationally recognized scholar in Baroque opera, specializing in the music of Handel and Purcell. She is also a performing soprano.

Wednesday, October 22nd, 2014

5:30 pm

Lewis Music Library (Bldg. 14E, 160 Memorial Drive)

Refreshments will be served.

Free & open to the public – Questions? Contact: (617) 253-5249

authors@mit is a co-sponsored by the MIT Libraries and the MIT Press Bookstore

 

OA research in the news: Study shows “substantial learning” in MOOC

Posted October 1st, 2014 by Katharine Dunn
by Ilonka Hebels, licensed under under CC-BY-NC-SA 2.0

by Ilonka Hebels, licensed under under CC-BY-NC-SA 2.0

Massive open online courses, or MOOCs, appear to be thriving. Want to hear about the “violent universe” from faculty at the Australian National University? Or take an introductory class on the music business from the renowned Berklee College of Music? These and hundreds of other courses have been offered on platforms like edX, Coursera, or Udacity in the two-and-a-half years since edX ran one of the first MOOCs out of MIT. Enticed by personal or professional edification, as well as the by the cost (free), thousands of people worldwide have signed up for online classes.

But are MOOC students learning anything?

This question has been little explored in the online teaching arena. Now, researchers including MIT physics professor David Pritchard, have published a study showing “substantial learning” in an edX MOOC. Using pretest and posttest questions, as well as analyzing homework and test results throughout the course, the researchers found that online students improved as well as or better than those in previously studied traditional classes.

Explore Professor Pritchard’s research in the Open Access Articles collection in DSpace@MIT, where it is openly accessible to the world.

Since the MIT faculty established their Open Access Policy in March 2009 they have made thousands of research papers freely available to the world via DSpace@MIT. To highlight that research, we’re offering a series of blog posts that link news stories about scholars’ work to their open access papers in DSpace.

New Handel book by Ellen T. Harris

Posted September 23rd, 2014 by Christie Moore

handelcover_harris_tnJust in:
George Frideric Handel: a Life with Friends, by MIT Professor Emeritus Ellen T. Harris
(ML410.H13 H279 2014)

Save the date to hear Professor Harris talk about the book at the authors@mit event on Oct.22!

OECD coming to MIT

Posted September 23rd, 2014 by Katherine McNeill

OECD logo

The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) is coming to MIT!  Join us to:

  • increase your knowledge of the world
  • get a leg up on your job search
  • enjoy some refreshments!

Join the Libraries for an event co-hosted by MIT Economics major Caroline Shinkle, the first-ever MIT student to be selected by the OECD to be a Student Ambassador. In this role, Caroline is raising awareness about the OECD within the MIT community.

When: Thursday, October 9, 2014, 3-4PM
Where: 14N-132
Register
Refreshments served

Kathleen DeBoer, Deputy Head of the OECD Washington Center, will present about the OECD iLibrary (http://libraries.mit.edu/get/oecd), including:

  • Information the OECD provides on countries around the world, in areas such as:
    • Development
    • Employment
    • Energy
    • Environment
    • Trade
    • and more…
  •  How to efficiently extract data from their vast array of statistics

Note: For those interested in working for the OECD, Ms. DeBoer will be available to meet in the afternoon before and after the presentation to discuss the application process. If interested, contact her at Kathleen.DEBOER@oecd.org.

The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) provides a forum in which governments can work together to share experiences and seek solutions to common problems. Today, 34 OECD member countries worldwide regularly turn to one another to identify problems, discuss and analyse them, and promote policies to solve them. It is one of the largest economics publishers in the world.

Chemistry societies and open access: new options for authors

Posted September 22nd, 2014 by Ellen Duranceau
OA speakers

Pictured above, L to R from top: Professor Christopher Cummins; Jennifer Griffiths, RSC; Mary Yess, ECS; Kevin Davies, ACS

The MIT Libraries are sponsoring a panel discussion on October 24 which will give authors an opportunity to hear directly from three chemistry societies about their new open access publishing options, and future plans.

Each of these societies has recently expanded their open access programs, and has announced new ways for authors to make their journal articles openly accessible.

The panel will be moderated by Steve Gass, Interim Director of Libraries, and will include:

  • Professor of Chemistry Christopher Cummins, who will offer his perspective as an MIT author and Associate Editor for the journal Chemical Science (published by the Royal Society of Chemistry).
  • American Chemical Society: Kevin Davies, VP of business development.
  • Electrochemical Society: Mary Yess, Deputy Executive Director/Chief Content Officer & Publisher.
  • Royal Society of Chemistry: Jennifer Griffiths, Editorial Development Manager for North America.

Short remarks from each speaker will be followed by a discussion.

Please join us for this panel, held in honor of International Open Access Week:

Date: October 24, 2014
Time: 12:00-1:00
Location: Room 2-105
Refreshments: a light lunch will be available at 11:45.

OA research in the news: Bhatia wins Lemelson-MIT Prize

Posted September 17th, 2014 by Katharine Dunn
Sangeeta Bhatia

Sangeeta Bhatia

Biomedical engineer and professor Sangeeta Bhatia has been awarded the 2014 Lemelson-MIT Prize, worth $500,000, which goes to mid-career inventors with a commitment to mentoring others and bettering the world with their work. Bhatia was cited for building “tiny technologies” in medicine that address complex problems in areas like drug toxicity, tissue regeneration, cancer therapeutics, and infectious disease. Among her inventions is a paper urine test for detecting cancer that has been adapted for use in developing areas.

Explore Professor Bhatia’s research in the Open Access Articles collection in DSpace@MIT, where it is openly accessible to the world.

Since the MIT faculty established their Open Access Policy in March 2009 they have made thousands of research papers freely available to the world via DSpace@MIT. To highlight that research, we’re offering a series of blog posts that link news stories about scholars’ work to their open access papers in DSpace.

Met Opera on Demand is here!

Posted September 17th, 2014 by Christie Moore

metoperaMet Opera on Demand is now available to members of the MIT community (5 simultaneous users; MIT certificates needed). Enjoy video and audio opera performances from the stage of the Metropolitan Opera in New York, spanning more than 75 years of the company’s broadcast history.

Persistent URL: libraries.mit.edu/get/metopera

Back-To-School on Energy

Posted September 16th, 2014 by Chris Sherratt

For many, September is the season of picking up where you left off, recapping what you already know, and/or taking research and learning in different directions. Next week the MIT Energy Club hosts its annual Energy Week, and in honor of the vast teaching and research around so many aspects of energy at MIT, here are a few of the Libraries great resources:

Comprehensive Renewable Energy, a one stop place to brush up on the basics of all things renewable! Want to see our new books without leaving your office?  Easy. And don’t forget the best place to start:  The Libraries Research Guide to Energy, where links to databases and statistics, like those from the IEA, abound! Finally, one of our newest database, CAB Abstracts, will bring you reports of energy development in rural places all around the world.

Enjoy the energy of MIT!

 

New covers for our new and old books

Posted September 16th, 2014 by willer

20140916_colibriYou might notice new covers in the library stacks this fall. The Curation and Preservation Services department is proud to introduce a new treatment for those lightly-worn books in our collection.

Please meet the CoLibri cover system jacket. These clear polyethylene jackets are an inexpensive way to give slightly damaged items a longer life on the shelf before having to either rebind or replace them. There are many options for repairing books, and this is just one of them, so stay tuned for future posts.

Open mics – save the dates!

Posted September 10th, 2014 by Christie Moore

pianoLibrary music! The open mic events are returning on the first Fridays of October, November, and December. Here’s your chance to play our piano or your own instrument. Free audience supplied for all performers.

Dates: Friday, October 3, 2014 — Friday, November 7 — Friday, December 5
Place: Lewis Music Library, Bldg. 14E-109
Time: noon- 1 pm
Refreshments provided.

Telegraphy exhibit opens in the Maihaugen Gallery

Posted September 8th, 2014 by Heather Denny

linemenWired: A World Transformed by the Telegraph, an exhibition highlighting the Libraries’ special collections in telegraphy, recently opened in the Maihaugen Gallery (14N-130).

Until the mid-19th century, most messages could travel across long distances only as quickly as they could be physically carried. Audiovisual systems such as smoke, flags, drums, beacons, and gunshots were cumbersome and severely limited in their sophistication and speed.

The electric telegraph changed all that. The ability to communicate instantaneously across entire continents – and even oceans – heralded the birth of telecommunications.

The current exhibition introduces a rich and varied collection of materials on the electric telegraph and its impact on the world. The collection is a gift of Thomas F. Peterson, Jr. (MIT 1957), who also made a generous donation to process and catalog its contents.

The exhibit includes telegrams, images, books, video, and ephemera that chart the birth of a huge industry, and reveal how business, warfare, social interactions, and even the arts were affected by this transformational technology.

Visit the Maihaugen Gallery Monday–Friday, 10 a.m.–4 p.m.

Zoom portable audio recorders

Posted September 4th, 2014 by Christie Moore

zoomFive Zoom portable audio recorders are now available in the Lewis Music Library for 1-day circulation to MIT students, faculty, or staff. Each carrying case contains the recorder and accessories including earbuds, USB cable, power adapter, rechargable batteries, and 1-page recording guide.

The Zooms were suggested by music faculty and funded by the Class of 1982 Music Library Fund.

The Lewis Music Library is located in Bldg. 14E-109 and library hours are posted on the web.

The music DVDs are out!

Posted September 3rd, 2014 by Christie Moore

DVDs_Aug14_tnDVDs in the Lewis Music Library are now in open stacks, right across from the service desk, where users can browse them. The collection of approx. 1,500 DVDs includes jazz, musicals, operas, documentaries, world music, and even some feature films (because film music is taught at MIT). Make your choices, have the cases unlocked by desk staff, and they are yours to enjoy for 7 days!

The Lewis Music Library is located in Bldg. 14E-109 and library hours are posted on the web.

OA research in the news: Ebola outbreak linked to funeral

Posted September 3rd, 2014 by Katharine Dunn

In a study published last week, researchers including MIT Biology professor Eric Lander show that this year’s explosive Ebola outbreak in West Africa possibly stemmed from the burial of a traditional healer at which 14 women were infected. Scientists sequenced the Ebola virus from 78 patients treated in Sierra Leone and found that the virus for all 78 could be traced to funeral guests. They also determined that the current Ebola strain is genetically distinct from a previous strain circulating elsewhere in Africa. This information could help scientists and public health officials determine which diagnostic tests and drugs may be most effective on the infection. Five authors on the study, all staff members at a hospital in Kenema, Sierra Leone, died of Ebola before the paper was published.

Explore Professor Lander’s research in the Open Access Articles collection in DSpace@MIT, where it is openly accessible to the world.

Since the MIT faculty established their Open Access Policy in March 2009 they have made thousands of research papers freely available to the world via DSpace@MIT. To highlight that research, we’re offering a series of blog posts that link news stories about scholars’ work to their open access papers in DSpace.

International Historical Statistics–now online!

Posted August 28th, 2014 by Katherine McNeill

IHS logo

Looking to study countries worldwide far back in time?  Want the convenience of country statistics at your fingertips?  International Historical Statistics now is available online!  Previously only available in print, this unique collection of statistics covers a wide range of economic and social topics for countries worldwide from 1750-2010.

Access data about the Americas, Europe, Africa, Asia and Oceania on the following topics:

  • population and labor force
  • agriculture
  • industry
  • external trade
  • transport and communications
  • finance
  • prices
  • education
  • national accounts

You can search or browse the collection and download data tables as PDF or Excel.  Access the database at: http://libraries.mit.edu/get/ihs.

Want more resources in this area?  Check out our guides to Country Data and Analysis, History, and Social Science Data Services.

What’s new at the Libraries this fall

Posted August 26th, 2014 by Heather Denny

nullWelcome back! The MIT Libraries have been busy over your summer vacation. We’ve made improvements, added new resources, expanded our services, and lined up great events for the fall. Here are some of the new things you can look forward to:

New website

  • Our homepage has a new look Everyone wants to look their best going back-to-school, including us! With your feedback we made major improvements to our homepage. The fresh new design features a streamlined search bar, less clutter, and easy to find hours, locations, research guides, and experts.

New resources & tools

  • Got data? Need help managing it? We can help MIT faculty and researchers manage, store, and share the data you produce. Evaluate your needs with this short checklist on our new Data Management website.

Expanded borrowing & easier renewing

  • More options for borrowing Borrow Direct, the partnership that allows you to borrow books from other Ivy League+ institutions, has expanded to include Johns Hopkins University. Search over 50 million volumes owned by Borrow Direct libraries through MIT’s WorldCat.
  • Keep your books longer You may have noticed this summer that you didn’t have to worry about renewing books as often. We launched automatic renewals this spring, giving you extra time with your books. Your library loans will now automatically renew 3 days before the due date, unless the book has been requested by another patron.

Upcoming events & exhibits

  • Fall exhibit opens Wired: A World Transformed by the Telegraph opens in the Maihaugen Gallery in September. Long before telephone or text, instantaneous messages travelled by telegraph. Explore the historic significance of this technological triumph of the 19th century through an exhibit featuring books, telegrams, photographs, manuscripts, and ephemera from the Libraries’ collections.
  • Fridays just got a little more fun, and furry Starting in October we’re expanding our popular therapy dog program. Now on the first Friday of each month this fall you can stop by Hayden Library for some one-on-one time with a dog. Petting a dog is great stress relief! Just drop by 2-4pm on October 3, November 7, or December 5.
  • Authors@MIT series returns The MIT Libraries and MIT Press Bookstore will offer a series of events with MIT authors. Join us in October for a reading by Ellen Harris who will discuss her most recent work, George Frideric Handel: A Life with Friends on Wednesday, October 22nd, at 5:30pm in the Lewis Music Library. Stay tuned for more events to come.

Follow the MIT Libraries on Twitter and Facebook for all the latest news and events.

New Requirements for DOE-funded Researchers: Public Access to Data and Publications

Posted August 18th, 2014 by Ellen Duranceau

In response to the 2013 Memorandum from the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, “Expanding Public Access to the Results of Federally Funded Research,” the Department of Energy (DOE) has issued a Public Access Plan.  The DOE is the first agency to release its open access plan in response to this directive, which applies to the largest federal agencies.

doe logoThe aim of the directive is to ensure that “the direct results of federally funded scientific research are made available to and useful for the public, industry, and the scientific community.”

Publications

Under the DOE plan, researchers will be required to submit accepted manuscripts of publications that report on DOE-supported research to an open access repository such as DSpace@MIT.  Researchers will also need to submit information about their publications to the DOE’s Office of Scientific and Technical Information.   DOE will begin to include these requirements in award agreements as of October 1, 2014.

Data

Also under the plan, researchers will be required to include in grant proposals a Data Management Plan outlining how the data generated in research will be shared and preserved.   These requirements take effect October 1, 2014 for the DOE’s Office of Science and by October 1, 2015 for other DOE offices.

The Libraries can help you comply with these new requirements:

In coming months, the Libraries will be evaluating what other services may be of help to DOE-funded researchers. If you have comments or suggestions, please contact:

For publications: contact Ellen Finnie Duranceau, Program Manager, Scholarly Publishing, Copyright, and Licensing, MIT Libraries

For data: contact the MIT Libraries’ data management team

OA research in the news: Report on the future of MIT education

Posted August 6th, 2014 by Katharine Dunn

This week, MIT President Rafael Reif released the final report of the Institute-wide Task Force on the Future of MIT Education, which “marks the beginning of an exciting new period of educational experimentation at MIT,” he wrote in a letter to the community.

Among other things, the report addresses MIT’s role in MOOCs, or massive open online courses, and suggests that MIT consider offering different levels of certification for students enrolled in classes through MITx and edX. It also recommends increasing the Institute’s undergraduate population or allowing students to complete their degrees in fewer than four years. The Task Force has been chaired by two faculty members: Karen Willcox, a professor of aeronautics and astronautics, and Sanjay Sarma, a professor of engineering who is also MIT’s director of digital learning.

Explore Professor Willcox’s research and Professor Sarma’s research in the Open Access Articles collection in DSpace@MIT, where it is openly accessible to the world.

Since the MIT faculty established their Open Access Policy in March 2009 they have made thousands of research papers freely available to the world via DSpace@MIT. To highlight that research, we’re offering a series of blog posts that link news stories about scholars’ work to their open access papers in DSpace.

OA research in the news: Reader for the visually impaired

Posted July 23rd, 2014 by Katharine Dunn

ring_in_use_correctedResearchers in the Media Lab’s Fluid Interfaces Group have built a prototype of a device that helps visually impaired people read printed text. The FingerReader, developed by graduate student Roy Shilkrot and professor Pattie Maes, among others, sits like a ring on a user’s finger and scans words via a built-in camera as the user points to them. Software identifies the words and translates them into an audio track. The FingerReader also alerts users if their finger veers away from a line of text.

Though the FingerReader isn’t on the market, the researchers say they’re looking into this option. As Maes recently told the Associated Press, the FingerReader is “a lot more flexible, a lot more immediate than any solution that they have right now.”

Explore Professor Maes’s research in the Open Access Articles collection in DSpace@MIT, where it is openly accessible to the world.

Since the MIT faculty established their Open Access Policy in March 2009 they have made thousands of research papers freely available to the world via DSpace@MIT. To highlight that research, we’re offering a series of blog posts that link news stories about scholars’ work to their open access papers in DSpace.

OA research in the news: Robotics expert Seth Teller dies

Posted July 9th, 2014 by Katharine Dunn
Seth Teller

Seth Teller

Seth Teller, a professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS) and head of the Robotics, Vision, and Sensor Networks group, died last week at the age of 50. In a message to the EECS community, several of Teller’s colleagues wrote: “There can be no doubt of the magnitude of the loss we face on both a personal and professional level. Seth’s outstanding contributions as a researcher, teacher, mentor, and colleague set a standard that has inspired many of us. He was a generous, warm person whose passion for his work was contagious. He had a unique ability to envision new approaches to problems, then assemble, motivate, and guide large research teams to accomplish things far beyond what they thought possible.”

Teller worked in a wide range of fields, including robotics, vision, graphics, and human-computer interfaces. He recently led the MIT team that will compete in the finals of the DARPA Robotics Challenge, the goal of which is to develop robots that can help humans in disaster zones. He was also a leader of MIT’s Fifth Sense Project, whose researchers develop wearable devices to assist blind and low-vision people.

Explore Professor Teller’s research in the Open Access Articles collection in DSpace@MIT, where it is openly accessible to the world.

Since the MIT faculty established their Open Access Policy in March 2009 they have made thousands of research papers freely available to the world via DSpace@MIT. To highlight that research, we’re offering a series of blog posts that link news stories about scholars’ work to their open access papers in DSpace.

Study Sanctuary—Hayden’s Lipchitz Courtyard

Posted June 27th, 2014 by Heather Denny

The Lipchitz Courtyard within Building 14 (adjacent to Hayden Library) is a hidden gem—a quiet, leafy retreat where you can find a sunny or shady spot to pull up a chair and read a book, or enjoy artwork from MIT’s Public Art Collection.

The courtyard contains three sculptures by 20th century Cubist artist Jacques LipchitzPhotographer Yulla Lipchitz donated the monumental bronze sculptures by her late husband in memory of the late MIT President Jerome B. Wiesner, founder of the Council for the Arts at MIT. 

The garden is also featured on the list of MIT’s pocket gardens, It contains paper birch trees, azalea, hydrangea, rhododendron, and flowering perennials. Stop by to see what’s in bloom, and enjoy this special oasis!

Llipchitzcourtyard_blog

Digital stewardship residents announced

Posted June 26th, 2014 by Heather Denny

LogoColorTextBelowThe National Digital Stewardship Residency Program of Boston (NDSR-Boston) has announced their first cohort of residents. MIT Libraries along with four other local institutions, will host the early-career residents who will focus on digital preservation projects at their institutions.

Tricia Patterson was chosen as MIT Libraries’ resident. She will begin her residency in September working on an important project to preserve MIT’s digital audio content. The “Making Music Last” project will involve preserving treasured audio documentation of music at MIT.

Patterson is a recent MSLIS graduate from Simmons College. She began her archival career at the Texas State Library and Archives Commission before moving to Boston. While at Simmons, she focused on digital preservation, digitizing textual collections at the John F. Kennedy presidential archive, and working as an editorial assistant and program facilitator for Simmons. She has worked at several other Boston-area institutions including Harvard University and the Boston Athenæum.

“It is very exciting for MIT Libraries to be an organizer of the National Digital Stewardship Residency (NDSR) Boston program and a host institution for its first cohort. Tricia Patterson is a wonderful fit for our project,” said Nancy McGovern, MIT Libraries’ Head of Curation and Preservation Services.

For more information about the projects and residents, visit the NDSR Boston website.

 

OA research in the news: The cost of patent trolls

Posted June 25th, 2014 by Katharine Dunn
Catherine Tucker

Catherine Tucker

A new study by a Sloan researcher suggests that the recent increase of so-called “patent trolls”—companies that do little more than sue others over patent rights—has resulted in a huge loss of entrepreneurial activity in the United States. The study, by marketing professor Catherine Tucker, correlates patent litigation and venture capital (VC) investment using data from 1995 to 2012. The “evidence suggests that more lawsuits can distract management from developing new and innovative products, and may cause them to ignore products targeted by lawsuits, in addition to the more obvious litigation costs,” she writes. The paper says that VC investment would have been more than $21 billion higher over five years if not for lawsuits brought over patents by frequent litigators.

Explore Professor Tucker’s research in the Open Access Articles collection in DSpace@MIT, where it is openly accessible to the world.

Since the MIT faculty established their Open Access Policy in March 2009 they have made thousands of research papers freely available to the world via DSpace@MIT. To highlight that research, we’re offering a series of blog posts that link news stories about scholars’ work to their open access papers in DSpace.

OA research in the news: Anand wins 2014 Drucker Medal

Posted June 11th, 2014 by Katharine Dunn
Lallit Anand

Lallit Anand

Mechanical engineering professor Lallit Anand has won the 2014 Daniel C. Drucker Medal, awarded by the Applied Mechanics Division of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. The medal is one of the highest distinctions a mechanician can achieve. Anand was cited for his “seminal contributions to the formulation of constitutive theories for the plastic response of a variety of engineering solids, including polycrystalline metals, metallic glasses, glassy polymers, and granular materials.”

Explore Professor Anand’s research in the Open Access Articles collection in DSpace@MIT, where it is openly accessible to the world.

Since the MIT faculty established their Open Access Policy in March 2009 they have made thousands of research papers freely available to the world via DSpace@MIT. To highlight that research, we’re offering a series of blog posts that link news stories about scholars’ work to their open access papers in DSpace

Make time to make more stuff!

Posted June 9th, 2014 by Chris Sherratt

tools2Knowing as we do that MIT people love to make things, last summer Mechanical Engineering Librarian Angie Locknar made a guide about designing & making stuff.

“We wanted to have one place to go to find things that people might need if they like to invent/create/build … plus we’re hoping users will send other helpful links to include.” Perhaps this is just what you need to kick start that still, but not for much longer, put-off project. Or you might want to finally master that cool new tool!

 

 

 

Discovering the Libraries: Top 10 things to know

Posted June 5th, 2014 by Pritee Tembhekar

By MIT Libraries’ student blogger, Pri Tembhekar

Hello everyone!

It is with bittersweet sentiment that I write my last blog for the MIT Libraries. This post will be about the top 10 things to know about the Libraries. I’ve covered some of these tips in other posts, so this entry will be a good way to tie it all together.

null

Bonus tip:The courtyard outside Hayden Library is a relaxing place to study.

  1. Library hideaways can make studying just a little better. The Libraries have many beautiful places to study and also contain 24-hour study rooms. Check out my post about the Lewis Music Library.
  2. Stop by the Libraries for textbooks. You don’t have to carry them around in order to study between classes. The Libraries have textbooks on reserve that you can check out for two hour increments. There are also some textbooks available online through the Libraries. It could save you significant money!
  3. Think outside your courses for fun options at the Libraries. The Libraries have resources well outside science and technology. The Libraries have videos and travel books. Check out my spring break post for more ideas.
  4. On a similar note, the Libraries can help you pursue your interests. The Lewis Library has concerts and open mics that could help nurture and preserve your interest in music. If art is more your style, the Libraries’ pass to the MFA allows you to take non-MIT friends along for free.
  5. Student jobs at the MIT Libraries are a fantastic way to make money and learn. There are many ways to get involved. From the student workers I interviewed, I really got the sense that working at the Libraries had become more than just a job. In my short time here I have learned a lot about blogging and felt a community among the Libraries’ staff. Check out my student jobs post.
  6. The libraries can make research less painful! For in-depth, longer-term research making an appointment with a librarian can go a long way. Subject matter experts can really push you in the right direction. See my post on research resources for more information.
  7. Research guides provide a quicker fix and concise information. They can be accessed online and cover a wide range of subjects. More information is available in the research resources post.
  8. One of the lesser known Libraries’ resources are the range of special events they host. During their IAPril series of events, I learned about using Mendeley software to manage PDFs and citations. There were also events on 3-D printing and business resources. Some events can be really surprising. For example, preservation week brought a letter locking event to MIT.
  9. Meet at least one librarian or staff member during your time at MIT. When I met Jana Dambrogio, I was amazed by her passion for letter locking, something I had never heard of. Not only are they incredible resources, but the Libraries’ staff have unique interests that are refreshing for someone immersed in science and technology.
  10. The Libraries’ scanners are fantastic. They create high quality images with no hassle. When I asked a few senior friends what they liked best, this was the most surprising answer.

I hope you’ve enjoyed reading my blog as much as I’ve enjoyed writing it! There’s an excellent video on this topic made by the Libraries and featuring students. Best of luck readers!

New! Access to the complete New Yorker

Posted May 30th, 2014 by Katherine McNeill

New Yorker cover image        

The current issue and all past issues of The New Yorker—going all the way back to very first in 1925—are now available to the MIT community through our subscription to The New Yorker Digital Archive.

You can read the magazine in its full-color glory anywhere you have a browser and an internet connection (try it on your iPad).  So if you’re traveling light this summer and have a hankering for “The Talk of the Town,” those sometimes uproarious, sometimes inscrutable cartoons, and a little Eustace Tilley, check out The New Yorker Digital Archive.

Discovering the Libraries: Archives and conservation

Posted May 30th, 2014 by Pritee Tembhekar

Hello everyone!

Null

Letters by William Barton Rogers

It has been a few weeks since I had the pleasure of visiting the Institute Archives and Conservation Lab, but I’m excited to write this belated post. This week’s post is about how the MIT Libraries preserve MIT’s rich history and how old, sensitive materials are treated and conserved for library users.

Most students know that William Barton Rogers founded the Institute in 1861. The details of MIT’s founding and early years are much less widely known. The MIT Libraries however has a surprisingly in-depth collection of materials relevant to MIT’s history. This includes letters that William Barton Rogers wrote, old student newspapers, and photographs of students and buildings. With the help of Nora Murphy, Archivist for Reference, Outreach and Instruction, I got a glimpse of some of the fascinating pieces in the archives.

One of the earliest and, in my opinion, most meaningful pieces was the letter by William Barton Rogers describing his vision for a technical institute. The letter is from 1846 and outlines parts of the MIT mission that are still with us today (right).

Many of the other artifacts give insight into life at MIT in the past. For example, going through old photobooks reveals the presence of international students very early in the Institute’s history (19th century students from China are present in photobooks). There are also pictures of MIT living quarters in the 1930s. Surprisingly, they don’t look starkly different from where we live today.

Important works of MIT students and faculty are also preserved here. I had the opportunity to see a chlorine level map made by Ellen Swallow Richards in the 1880s. Richards was the first female student admitted into MIT and subsequently the first female instructor here.  She is notable for her work in environmental chemistry and testing levels of various toxins in food and water. The MIT Archives has her work as well as some of her personal history. Richards appears in the journal of Louisa Hewins, which the Libraries has in their collection.

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Journal of Louisa Hewins featuring Ellen Swallow Richards (1880s)

A few of the pieces that I saw were just plain fun. For example, the class of ’84 yearbook (1884 that is) has fantastic photos of student organizations. The fencing team is shown below. It also has rosters of fraternity members.

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Fencing team photo in 1884 yearbook

The Tech from June 10, 1910 featured pictures of the Institute buildings and the president of the time. It’s interesting to see what made students of the time take notice.

I went on to see the Wunsch Conservation Lab in the MIT Libraries. Jana Dambrogio, the conservator, gave me an inside look into the life of a book in need of restoration. Jana’s specialty in recent years has been around letter locking, a practice by which letters were sent without an envelope. The letters are folded in different ways that hide the contents of the letter without using more (scarce) paper. It was refreshing to hear about a passion outside science and engineering. Jana explained to me the fine line between restoration of an artifact to its old state and preservation of “imperfections” with historical meaning. I got the chance to see an old work that is currently undergoing analysis.  Jana and her colleagues are looking into the structure of the book and drawing insights about how it was made.

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Tech newspaper from June 10, 1910

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Jana Dambrogio explains the structure of a book

I also met Kate Beattie who was doing a completely different kind of work preparing books for circulation to MIT users. It just goes to show the range of initiatives that the conservation lab engages in.

Thanks again to Jana Dambrogio and Nora Murphy for showing me around!