Music

Longer CD/DVD loans on summer weekends

Posted May 25th, 2011 by Christie Moore
echoes_nightingales

New CD: PhonCD B758 ech

Take advantage of a few extra days when you borrow music CDs and DVDs over the summer! Since the Lewis Music Library will be closed Saturdays and Sundays beginning Memorial Day weekend, CDs and DVDs borrowed on a Wednesday, Thursday, or Friday will be due the following Monday (by closing, 5 pm). Limit of 5, no renewals.

See lists of the newest music books, scores, CDs, and DVDs: Recent Additions to the Collections

The Lewis Music Library is located in Bldg. 14E-109 and library hours are posted on the web.

New CD set: Leonard Bernstein Symphony Edition

Posted May 20th, 2011 by Christie Moore

A new set of CDs has begun to appear in the Lewis Music Library: a 60-disc set of the conductor’s symphonic recordings with the New York Philharmonic from 1953 to 1976.

The first few are ready to circulate and the rest will follow as they are cataloged. Search by call number (PhonCD B458 lbsym v.1-) or keep an eye on Recent Additions to the Collections (page loaded weekly).

Music CDs and DVDs circulate for 3 days to members of the MIT community (limit of 5, no renewals). The Lewis Music Library is located in Bldg. 14E-109 and library hours are posted on the web.

Classical Scores Library now available

Posted May 2nd, 2011 by mit-admin

Classical Scores Library is now available to the MIT community. This database contains over 400,000 pages of classical music scores, manuscripts, and previously unpublished material, allowing for the study and analysis of more than 25,000 musical scores.

http://libraries.mit.edu/get/escores

Sonorous Currents, live electronic music: May 4, 4 pm

Posted April 27th, 2011 by Christie Moore

Come hear a performance of new music for live electronics with laptops, iPhones, circuits, and other sonological mechanisms in the Lewis Music Library from 4:00-5:00 pm on Wednesday, May 4, 2011. Students from Visiting Assistant Professor Christopher T. Ariza’s Music and Technology class will share their compositions.

Wednesday, May 4, 4 – 5 pm
Lewis Music Library 14E-109
For more information: 617-253-5636

Browse the newest music CDs and DVDs!

Posted April 22nd, 2011 by Christie Moore

cdrack

Now you can browse the Lewis Music Library’s newest CDs and DVDs! A display rack in the reading room holds 40 of the most recently received discs. Bring your choices up to the service desk to check them out.

Music CDs and DVDs circulate for 3 days to members of the MIT community (limit of 5, no renewals).

See lists of the newest music books, scores, CDs, and DVDs: Recent Additions to the Collections

The Lewis Music Library is located in Bldg. 14E-109 and library hours are posted on the web.

Digital library partnership gives MIT access to additional online resources

Posted April 20th, 2011 by Heather Denny

The MIT Libraries have recently joined HathiTrust, a partnership of over fifty academic libraries that share the ambitious goal of building a comprehensive digital library of their shared collections.

Started in 2008, the HathiTrust digital library currently contains over 8.5 million digitized volumes representing the collections of partner institutions. HathiTrust’s collections include both copyright and public domain materials digitized by Google, the Internet Archive, and Microsoft, as well as partner institutions.  Founded by twelve universities from the Committee on Institutional Cooperation, the University of California system and the University of Virginia, the partnership has now grown to include fifty-five institutions.  MIT and Harvard are two of the most recent universities to join.

Through the HathiTrust website, the public can search the full-text of 8.4 million digitized volumes, and get full online access to 2.2 million volumes that are in the public domain.  With the MIT Libraries membership, the MIT community will have the added benefit of being able to download full volumes of public domain works in PDF format, and also build and share collections using the Collection Builder feature.  Access will be provided to MIT users, with authentication through Touchstone, later this year.

Joining HathiTrust is one of several steps the MIT Libraries have recently taken to expand access for MIT faculty and students to print or digitized resources beyond the holdings of MIT.  In January, the Libraries announced their membership in Borrow Direct, a partnership with Ivy Plus libraries that gives the MIT community access to nearly 50 million print items. In February, MIT and Harvard libraries jointly announced an expanded alliance to explore collaborations for sharing library materials, advancing digital preservation collections practice, and developing future off-site storage facilities and services.

“In today’s interdisciplinary learning environment, it’s essential for our faculty, students and researchers to have access to an even wider array of information resources than ever before.  By collaborating with other outstanding research libraries, we can offer the resources necessary to support the cutting edge research and education that is MIT’s hallmark,” said MIT Director of Libraries, Ann Wolpert.

Wolpert added that it is important for universities to take a leading role in shaping digital libraries. “Libraries have been stewards of the scholarly record for centuries,” she said.  “We’re committed to the long haul.”

The MIT Libraries are actively involved in open access initiatives that support MIT’s mission to make scholarly knowledge openly available to the world.  Partnering with HathiTrust, an organization committed to collecting, organizing, preserving, communicating, and sharing the record of human knowledge, is in line with the Libraries principles of supporting the long-term curation of the cultural record, and furthering global scholarship and research.

New CD: Musical London c.1700: from Purcell to Handel

Posted April 12th, 2011 by Christie Moore

A beautiful CD of 18th-century music from England was recently received by the Lewis Music Library:

musical london

PhonCD H988 mus

Click on the image to see the Barton catalog record.

Music CDs and DVDs circulate for 3 days to members of the MIT community (limit of 5, no renewals).

The Lewis Music Library is located in Bldg. 14E-109 and library hours are posted on the web.

MIT in Popular Culture . . . at the MIT Libraries

Posted April 4th, 2011 by Lois Beattie

Paniponi Dash

You’ve probably noticed that MIT pops up all over the place in popular culture. Good Will Hunting? Check. Bringing Down the House? Already read it. But did you know that there’s an MIT reference in the musical Rent? And have you ever watched Paniponi Dash or read The Gadget Maker? You can check out all these and more at the MIT Libraries.

The Gadget MakerTo help celebrate MIT’s 150th anniversary, we’ve found many of these books, CDs, and DVDs–from the obscure and out-of-print to the biggest blockbusters–in our stacks, and added a few we didn’t already have. Take a look at this guide to check out representations of MIT in books, films, TV shows, and music.

Violin music concert Friday, April 8th

Posted April 1st, 2011 by Christie Moore

violinDon’t have tickets to Opening Day at Fenway? Join us at the library on April 8th instead!

The 9th annual Prokopoff violin music concert will be held in the Lewis Music Library from 1:00-2:00 pm on that day. MIT students will perform music chosen from the more than 2,000 violin scores given to the library in 2001 by Stephen Prokopoff’s widow Lois Craig, former Associate Dean of MIT’s School of Architecture and Planning. Director of Libraries Ann Wolpert will toss out the opening pitch and introduce the starting lineup. Play music!

Friday, April 8, 1 – 2 pm
Lewis Music Library 14E-109
For more information: 617-253-5636

iPad 2 at Lewis Music Library!

Posted March 14th, 2011 by Christie Moore

iPad 2

Want to try out the new iPad 2? The Lewis Music Library has purchased a Wi-Fi iPad 2 for circulation to MIT faculty, students and staff. It contains over 100 music apps along with an iTunes library holding over 3,000 audio clips from the library’s recently-received CDs. It circulates for 4 hours (no renewals or overnight loans). First come, first served.

The iPad 2 was purchased with money from the Class of 1982 Music Library Fund.

The Lewis Music Library is located in Bldg. 14E-109 and library hours are posted on the web.

New Maxwell Davies opera CD at Lewis Music Library

Posted March 7th, 2011 by Christie Moore

A CD of the first complete recording of Sir Peter Maxwell Davies’ opera Taverner was just received by the Lewis Music Library:

PhonCD D288 tav

Click on the image to see the Barton catalog record.

Music CDs and DVDs circulate for 3 days to members of the MIT community (limit of 5, no renewals).

The Lewis Music Library is located in Bldg. 14E-109 and library hours are posted on the web.

Save the date! Violin music concert April 8th

Posted February 28th, 2011 by Christie Moore

violinSave the date: the 9th annual Prokopoff violin music concert will be held in the Lewis Music Library at 1 pm on Friday, April 8, 2011.

MIT students will perform music chosen from the more than 2,000 violin scores given to the library in 2001 by Stephen Prokopoff’s widow Lois Craig, former Associate Dean of MIT’s School of Architecture and Planning.

Friday, April 8, 1 – 2 pm
Lewis Music Library 14E-109
For more information: 617-253-5636

Featured new CD at the Lewis Music Library

Posted February 28th, 2011 by Christie Moore

This CD was just received by the Lewis Music Library:

daugherty

PhonCD D265 orcmu a

Click on the image to see the Barton catalog record. Music CDs and DVDs circulate for 3 days to members of the MIT community (limit of 5, no renewals).

Naxos CDs are also available to the MIT community as streaming audio: http://libraries.mit.edu/get/naxos

The Lewis Music Library is located in Bldg. 14E-109 and library hours are posted on the web.

Cool new CD at Lewis Music Library

Posted February 22nd, 2011 by Christie Moore

Here’s a cool new CD that was just received by the Lewis Music Library:

blackkeysClick on the image to see the Barton catalog record. Music CDs and DVDs circulate for 3 days to members of the MIT community (limit of 5, no renewals).

If there is a CD or DVD that you think belongs in the library’s collection, put in a suggested purchase request!

The Lewis Music Library is located in Bldg. 14E-109 and library hours are posted on the web.

Harpsichord lecture/recital Feb.25: Musical Paintings

Posted February 9th, 2011 by Christie Moore

MIT music lecturers Jean Rife and Teresa Neff will present a lecture/recital, Musical Paintings: Jean-Philippe Rameau and 18th-Century Life on Friday, February 25, from 1-2 pm in the Lewis Music Library, 14E-109.

Photo©Susan Wilson, susanwilsonphoto.com

Jean Rife, lecturer in Music and Theater Arts at MIT, will perform Pièces de clavecin by Jean-Philippe Rameau (1683-1764).

Teresa Neff, lecturer in Music and Theater Arts at MIT, Research Fellow for the Handel and Haydn Society and faculty at Boston Conservatory, will provide commentary on the music.

Location: Lewis Music Library, 14E-109

More information: 617-253-5636

Free and open to the public

Harvard and MIT Libraries Explore Far-Reaching Alliance

Posted February 4th, 2011 by Heather Denny

Hayden Library, MIT

Widener Library, Harvard University

New agreement reflects physical proximity, cross-registration, joint programs, and research affinities

The Provosts of Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) have charged their respective library systems to explore expanded collaborations for sharing library materials, advancing digital preservation and collection, and developing future off-site storage facilities.

Both institutions have identified increased collaboration between and among their complementary libraries as an essential element in developing the research library of the 21st century. While an ambitious level of collaboration is anticipated, each library system will remain engaged with and guided by the respective missions and priorities of each university. While enhanced collaboration may serve to reduce prospective costs, the focus of the collaboration is on the future of 21st-century library services, technologies, and collections.

“No single library system can expect to meet the full intellectual needs of the academic and research communities of MIT and Harvard,” stated Harvard Provost Steven E. Hyman. “A wide-ranging exploration of all opportunities for collaboration is of great interest to both institutions.”

Both formal and informal relationships already exist between the MIT and Harvard libraries. MIT has shared in the use of the Harvard Depository since its inception in 1985. A 1995 agreement between Harvard College Library (HCL) and MIT brought reciprocal borrowing privileges to faculty, researchers, and graduate students in both institutions. An April 2010 pilot program extended those privileges to undergraduate students.

While traditional library materials have been the focus of prior agreements, digital materials are at the forefront of the new alliance.

“The increasing primacy of digital materials brings its own urgency to our collaboration, ” observed MIT Provost L. Rafael Reif.  “As new models of online information delivery emerge, Harvard and MIT can support joint programs for open-access as well as joint acquisition and licensing approaches that are appropriate for education and academic research.”

Under the agreement, the two libraries will develop a four-tiered action plan by the end of 2011.  The four tiers are:

Reciprocal access to circulating collections

By developing linked access between Harvard and MIT library catalogs and implementing reciprocal privileges that extend to Harvard’s graduate and professional school libraries, library patrons can anticipate full access to 20 million volumes that users will experience as a single collection.

Enhancing digital preservation and collection practices

MIT and Harvard have earned leadership roles through their open access programs and repositories and through their respective approaches to digital preservation. High priority areas for collaborative growth include digital archives of faculty papers and web-based publications.

Developing wider access to electronic information

Questions of electronic serials pricing, and the costs of building digital information management and delivery systems, point to opportunities for Harvard and MIT to investigate new models for licensing agreements, as well as alternative, open access forms of publication that reflect each institution’s commitment to the dissemination of new knowledge.

Envisioning joint off-site storage facilities for the future

Harvard and MIT have shared the Harvard Depository for high-density, non-browsable, off-site storage since 1985. Together, the two universities could effectively anticipate both a new service model and an additional facility for off-site storage.

“We’ve enjoyed a collaborative working relationship with Harvard’s libraries for many years,” said Ann Wolpert, Director of the MIT Libraries.  “This new agreement builds on our successes and underscores the commitment we share to provide our communities with the best and broadest range of resources possible, and to be at the forefront of advancing the digital preservation of scholarly work.”

“In several ways, the libraries of Harvard and MIT are already united by proximity and affinity,” said Helen Shenton, Executive Director of the Harvard Library. “Our new agreement supports the distinct priorities of two very singular universities. At the same time, it challenges us to collaborate on a sustainable information ecosystem for the 21st century.”

Harpsichord lecture/recital Jan.28: They Danced to This?

Posted January 19th, 2011 by Christie Moore

Music lecturers Jean Rife and Teresa Neff will present a lecture/recital, They Danced to This? French Harpsichord Music on Friday, January 28, 2011 from noon-1pm in the Lewis Music Library, 14E-109.

Jean Rife

Photo©Susan Wilson, www.susanwilsonphoto.com

Jean Rife, lecturer in Music and Theater Arts at MIT, will perform harpsichord suites by Elisabeth-Claude Jacquet de La Guerre and Jean-Philippe Rameau.

Teresa Neff, lecturer in Music and Theater Arts at MIT, Research Fellow for the Handel and Haydn Society and faculty at Boston Conservatory, will provide commentary on the music.

Location: Lewis Music Library, 14E-109

More information: 617-253-5636

Free and open to the public

Library Locations Closed Over Christmas & New Year's Holiday Week

Posted December 2nd, 2010 by Melissa Feiden
MIT winter scene

photo by: Tom Pixton

All MIT Libraries locations, with the exception of the 24-hour study facilities in Hayden and Dewey libraries, will be closed Thursday, December 23, 2010 through Sunday, January 2, 2011, as a cost saving measure to meet Institute budget reductions.

During the closure, the Libraries’ website, Barton, Vera and access to electronic licensed resources will be available.  However, most library staff will be on furlough and will not be available to offer assistance. A small number of staff will be on-call to address any reported system outages; reasonable attempts will be made to bring systems back online as soon as possible.

While it will continue to be possible to make online requests for some MIT Libraries’ services or materials, these requests will not be acted upon until the Libraries reopen.  Due dates for materials on loan have been adjusted to reflect the closure – no items will be due during this period and fines will not accrue.  We apologize for any inconvenience.

Visit our library hours page for a complete list of individual library hours.

Please send questions, comments or concerns to budgetfeedback-lib@mit.edu.

Lewis Music Library hosts early music lecture on Monday, Nov.15

Posted November 5th, 2010 by Heather Denny

“Quill and Pixel: Chansonniers and their Modern Readers”
A lecture by Dr. Jane Alden, Associate Professor of Music at Wesleyan University

Where: MIT Lewis Music Library, 14E-109

When: Monday, November 15, 2010, 5:00 pm

Medieval and Renaissance manuscripts were often beautiful, exceptionally crafted, and extraordinarily expensive items, and the modern facsimiles that seek to reproduce the originals can have the same qualities and drawbacks. By contrast, the Internet has brought images of many of these amazing artifacts to a wide audience at no cost. Yet the expensive, physical publications are still in wide demand by collectors and libraries. Dr. Jane Alden, Associate Professor of Music at Wesleyan University, will discuss this seeming paradox in her lecture, “Quill and Pixel: Chansonniers and their Modern Readers.” Dr. Alden will discuss ways in which today’s technology has changed our relationship to original manuscripts (especially 15th-century French songbooks) and what role published facsimiles may play in the future.
This event is free and open to the public.

Heart-shaped MS, 22 x 16 cm, 144 pp.

Citation software classes offered in October

Posted September 14th, 2010 by Heather Denny

Learn how to manage your articles and cite your references more effectively in these hands-on workshops.  Register now for October.

All workshops will take place in the Digital Instruction Resource Center (DIRC), 14N-132.

Managing Your References:   Overview of EndNote, RefWorks, and Zotero

WHEN:   Wednesday, October 6, 5 – 6pm

Citation management software is an important tool in today’s academic world.   These software packages allow users to search databases, retrieve relevant citations, and build a bibliography, to be added to a paper or thesis or stored for future reference.  But which software product should you use, and how do you get started?

This session will focus on Endnote, RefWorks, and Zotero, the three major options for citation software at MIT.  We will compare the three and introduce some of the basic concepts and functionality of each program.

Please pre-register for this session.   Contact Mat Willmott with questions.

EndNote Basics

WHEN:   Wednesday, October 13, 5 – 6pm

EndNote is a “personal bibliographic software” package that allows you to create and manage a database of bibliographic references.  Come to this hands-on workshop to learn how to use Endnote to manage your citations, create bibliographies and more.

Please pre-register for this session.   Contact Peter Cohn with any questions.

RefWorks Basics

WHEN:  Wednesday, October 20, 5 – 6pm

RefWorks is a web-based resource to help you organize references, create a bibliography, and easily cite references as you write your paper.  It allows you to create individual or group accounts.

Please pre-register for this session.  Contact Anita Perkins with any questions.

Zotero Basics

WHEN:  Wednesday, October 27, 5 – 6pm

Zotero is a free, open-source program for Firefox that helps you collect, manage, cite, and share your citations and files.  With one click, you can save PDFs and citations for most articles, then cite them in Word or OpenOffice.  Make a searchable PDF library and find out how to publish dynamic bibliographies and collaborate by using group collections.  In this hands-on session, learn tips and tricks on how to use Zotero more efficiently to save you time and energy.  Bring a laptop or use one of our computers.

Please pre-register for this session.  Contact Remlee Green with any questions.