Subject/Topic areas

International Historical Statistics–now online!

Posted August 28th, 2014 by Katherine McNeill

IHS logo

Looking to study countries worldwide far back in time?  Want the convenience of country statistics at your fingertips?  International Historical Statistics now is available online!  Previously only available in print, this unique collection of statistics covers a wide range of economic and social topics for countries worldwide from 1750-2010.

Access data about the Americas, Europe, Africa, Asia and Oceania on the following topics:

  • population and labor force
  • agriculture
  • industry
  • external trade
  • transport and communications
  • finance
  • prices
  • education
  • national accounts

You can search or browse the collection and download data tables as PDF or Excel.  Access the database at: http://libraries.mit.edu/get/ihs.

Want more resources in this area?  Check out our guides to Country Data and Analysis, History, and Social Science Data Services.

What’s new at the Libraries this fall

Posted August 26th, 2014 by Heather Denny

nullWelcome back! The MIT Libraries have been busy over your summer vacation. We’ve made improvements, added new resources, expanded our services, and lined up great events for the fall. Here are some of the new things you can look forward to:

New website

  • Our homepage has a new look Everyone wants to look their best going back-to-school, including us! With your feedback we made major improvements to our homepage. The fresh new design features a streamlined search bar, less clutter, and easy to find hours, locations, research guides, and experts.

New resources & tools

  • Got data? Need help managing it? We can help MIT faculty and researchers manage, store, and share the data you produce. Evaluate your needs with this short checklist on our new Data Management website.

Expanded borrowing & easier renewing

  • More options for borrowing Borrow Direct, the partnership that allows you to borrow books from other Ivy League+ institutions, has expanded to include Johns Hopkins University. Search over 50 million volumes owned by Borrow Direct libraries through MIT’s WorldCat.
  • Keep your books longer You may have noticed this summer that you didn’t have to worry about renewing books as often. We launched automatic renewals this spring, giving you extra time with your books. Your library loans will now automatically renew 3 days before the due date, unless the book has been requested by another patron.

Upcoming events & exhibits

  • Fall exhibit opens Wired: A World Transformed by the Telegraph opens in the Maihaugen Gallery in September. Long before telephone or text, instantaneous messages travelled by telegraph. Explore the historic significance of this technological triumph of the 19th century through an exhibit featuring books, telegrams, photographs, manuscripts, and ephemera from the Libraries’ collections.
  • Fridays just got a little more fun, and furry Starting in October we’re expanding our popular therapy dog program. Now on the first Friday of each month this fall you can stop by Hayden Library for some one-on-one time with a dog. Petting a dog is great stress relief! Just drop by 2-4pm on October 3, November 7, or December 5.
  • Authors@MIT series returns The MIT Libraries and MIT Press Bookstore will offer a series of events with MIT authors. Join us in October for a reading by Ellen Harris who will discuss her most recent work, George Frideric Handel: A Life with Friends on Wednesday, October 22nd, at 5:30pm in the Lewis Music Library. Stay tuned for more events to come.

Follow the MIT Libraries on Twitter and Facebook for all the latest news and events.

New Requirements for DOE-funded Researchers: Public Access to Data and Publications

Posted August 18th, 2014 by Ellen Duranceau

In response to the 2013 Memorandum from the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, “Expanding Public Access to the Results of Federally Funded Research,” the Department of Energy (DOE) has issued a Public Access Plan.  The DOE is the first agency to release its open access plan in response to this directive, which applies to the largest federal agencies.

doe logoThe aim of the directive is to ensure that “the direct results of federally funded scientific research are made available to and useful for the public, industry, and the scientific community.”

Publications

Under the DOE plan, researchers will be required to submit accepted manuscripts of publications that report on DOE-supported research to an open access repository such as DSpace@MIT.  Researchers will also need to submit information about their publications to the DOE’s Office of Scientific and Technical Information.   DOE will begin to include these requirements in award agreements as of October 1, 2014.

Data

Also under the plan, researchers will be required to include in grant proposals a Data Management Plan outlining how the data generated in research will be shared and preserved.   These requirements take effect October 1, 2014 for the DOE’s Office of Science and by October 1, 2015 for other DOE offices.

The Libraries can help you comply with these new requirements:

In coming months, the Libraries will be evaluating what other services may be of help to DOE-funded researchers. If you have comments or suggestions, please contact:

For publications: contact Ellen Finnie Duranceau, Program Manager, Scholarly Publishing, Copyright, and Licensing, MIT Libraries

For data: contact the MIT Libraries’ data management team

OA research in the news: Report on the future of MIT education

Posted August 6th, 2014 by Katharine Dunn

This week, MIT President Rafael Reif released the final report of the Institute-wide Task Force on the Future of MIT Education, which “marks the beginning of an exciting new period of educational experimentation at MIT,” he wrote in a letter to the community.

Among other things, the report addresses MIT’s role in MOOCs, or massive open online courses, and suggests that MIT consider offering different levels of certification for students enrolled in classes through MITx and edX. It also recommends increasing the Institute’s undergraduate population or allowing students to complete their degrees in fewer than four years. The Task Force has been chaired by two faculty members: Karen Willcox, a professor of aeronautics and astronautics, and Sanjay Sarma, a professor of engineering who is also MIT’s director of digital learning.

Explore Professor Willcox’s research and Professor Sarma’s research in the Open Access Articles collection in DSpace@MIT, where it is openly accessible to the world.

Since the MIT faculty established their Open Access Policy in March 2009 they have made thousands of research papers freely available to the world via DSpace@MIT. To highlight that research, we’re offering a series of blog posts that link news stories about scholars’ work to their open access papers in DSpace.

OA research in the news: Reader for the visually impaired

Posted July 23rd, 2014 by Katharine Dunn

ring_in_use_correctedResearchers in the Media Lab’s Fluid Interfaces Group have built a prototype of a device that helps visually impaired people read printed text. The FingerReader, developed by graduate student Roy Shilkrot and professor Pattie Maes, among others, sits like a ring on a user’s finger and scans words via a built-in camera as the user points to them. Software identifies the words and translates them into an audio track. The FingerReader also alerts users if their finger veers away from a line of text.

Though the FingerReader isn’t on the market, the researchers say they’re looking into this option. As Maes recently told the Associated Press, the FingerReader is “a lot more flexible, a lot more immediate than any solution that they have right now.”

Explore Professor Maes’s research in the Open Access Articles collection in DSpace@MIT, where it is openly accessible to the world.

Since the MIT faculty established their Open Access Policy in March 2009 they have made thousands of research papers freely available to the world via DSpace@MIT. To highlight that research, we’re offering a series of blog posts that link news stories about scholars’ work to their open access papers in DSpace.

OA research in the news: Robotics expert Seth Teller dies

Posted July 9th, 2014 by Katharine Dunn
Seth Teller

Seth Teller

Seth Teller, a professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS) and head of the Robotics, Vision, and Sensor Networks group, died last week at the age of 50. In a message to the EECS community, several of Teller’s colleagues wrote: “There can be no doubt of the magnitude of the loss we face on both a personal and professional level. Seth’s outstanding contributions as a researcher, teacher, mentor, and colleague set a standard that has inspired many of us. He was a generous, warm person whose passion for his work was contagious. He had a unique ability to envision new approaches to problems, then assemble, motivate, and guide large research teams to accomplish things far beyond what they thought possible.”

Teller worked in a wide range of fields, including robotics, vision, graphics, and human-computer interfaces. He recently led the MIT team that will compete in the finals of the DARPA Robotics Challenge, the goal of which is to develop robots that can help humans in disaster zones. He was also a leader of MIT’s Fifth Sense Project, whose researchers develop wearable devices to assist blind and low-vision people.

Explore Professor Teller’s research in the Open Access Articles collection in DSpace@MIT, where it is openly accessible to the world.

Since the MIT faculty established their Open Access Policy in March 2009 they have made thousands of research papers freely available to the world via DSpace@MIT. To highlight that research, we’re offering a series of blog posts that link news stories about scholars’ work to their open access papers in DSpace.

Study Sanctuary—Hayden’s Lipchitz Courtyard

Posted June 27th, 2014 by Heather Denny

The Lipchitz Courtyard within Building 14 (adjacent to Hayden Library) is a hidden gem—a quiet, leafy retreat where you can find a sunny or shady spot to pull up a chair and read a book, or enjoy artwork from MIT’s Public Art Collection.

The courtyard contains three sculptures by 20th century Cubist artist Jacques LipchitzPhotographer Yulla Lipchitz donated the monumental bronze sculptures by her late husband in memory of the late MIT President Jerome B. Wiesner, founder of the Council for the Arts at MIT. 

The garden is also featured on the list of MIT’s pocket gardens, It contains paper birch trees, azalea, hydrangea, rhododendron, and flowering perennials. Stop by to see what’s in bloom, and enjoy this special oasis!

Llipchitzcourtyard_blog

Digital stewardship residents announced

Posted June 26th, 2014 by Heather Denny

LogoColorTextBelowThe National Digital Stewardship Residency Program of Boston (NDSR-Boston) has announced their first cohort of residents. MIT Libraries along with four other local institutions, will host the early-career residents who will focus on digital preservation projects at their institutions.

Tricia Patterson was chosen as MIT Libraries’ resident. She will begin her residency in September working on an important project to preserve MIT’s digital audio content. The “Making Music Last” project will involve preserving treasured audio documentation of music at MIT.

Patterson is a recent MSLIS graduate from Simmons College. She began her archival career at the Texas State Library and Archives Commission before moving to Boston. While at Simmons, she focused on digital preservation, digitizing textual collections at the John F. Kennedy presidential archive, and working as an editorial assistant and program facilitator for Simmons. She has worked at several other Boston-area institutions including Harvard University and the Boston Athenæum.

“It is very exciting for MIT Libraries to be an organizer of the National Digital Stewardship Residency (NDSR) Boston program and a host institution for its first cohort. Tricia Patterson is a wonderful fit for our project,” said Nancy McGovern, MIT Libraries’ Head of Curation and Preservation Services.

For more information about the projects and residents, visit the NDSR Boston website.

 

OA research in the news: The cost of patent trolls

Posted June 25th, 2014 by Katharine Dunn
Catherine Tucker

Catherine Tucker

A new study by a Sloan researcher suggests that the recent increase of so-called “patent trolls”—companies that do little more than sue others over patent rights—has resulted in a huge loss of entrepreneurial activity in the United States. The study, by marketing professor Catherine Tucker, correlates patent litigation and venture capital (VC) investment using data from 1995 to 2012. The “evidence suggests that more lawsuits can distract management from developing new and innovative products, and may cause them to ignore products targeted by lawsuits, in addition to the more obvious litigation costs,” she writes. The paper says that VC investment would have been more than $21 billion higher over five years if not for lawsuits brought over patents by frequent litigators.

Explore Professor Tucker’s research in the Open Access Articles collection in DSpace@MIT, where it is openly accessible to the world.

Since the MIT faculty established their Open Access Policy in March 2009 they have made thousands of research papers freely available to the world via DSpace@MIT. To highlight that research, we’re offering a series of blog posts that link news stories about scholars’ work to their open access papers in DSpace.

OA research in the news: Anand wins 2014 Drucker Medal

Posted June 11th, 2014 by Katharine Dunn
Lallit Anand

Lallit Anand

Mechanical engineering professor Lallit Anand has won the 2014 Daniel C. Drucker Medal, awarded by the Applied Mechanics Division of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. The medal is one of the highest distinctions a mechanician can achieve. Anand was cited for his “seminal contributions to the formulation of constitutive theories for the plastic response of a variety of engineering solids, including polycrystalline metals, metallic glasses, glassy polymers, and granular materials.”

Explore Professor Anand’s research in the Open Access Articles collection in DSpace@MIT, where it is openly accessible to the world.

Since the MIT faculty established their Open Access Policy in March 2009 they have made thousands of research papers freely available to the world via DSpace@MIT. To highlight that research, we’re offering a series of blog posts that link news stories about scholars’ work to their open access papers in DSpace

Make time to make more stuff!

Posted June 9th, 2014 by Chris Sherratt

tools2Knowing as we do that MIT people love to make things, last summer Mechanical Engineering Librarian Angie Locknar made a guide about designing & making stuff.

“We wanted to have one place to go to find things that people might need if they like to invent/create/build … plus we’re hoping users will send other helpful links to include.” Perhaps this is just what you need to kick start that still, but not for much longer, put-off project. Or you might want to finally master that cool new tool!

 

 

 

Discovering the Libraries: Top 10 things to know

Posted June 5th, 2014 by Pritee Tembhekar

By MIT Libraries’ student blogger, Pri Tembhekar

Hello everyone!

It is with bittersweet sentiment that I write my last blog for the MIT Libraries. This post will be about the top 10 things to know about the Libraries. I’ve covered some of these tips in other posts, so this entry will be a good way to tie it all together.

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Bonus tip:The courtyard outside Hayden Library is a relaxing place to study.

  1. Library hideaways can make studying just a little better. The Libraries have many beautiful places to study and also contain 24-hour study rooms. Check out my post about the Lewis Music Library.
  2. Stop by the Libraries for textbooks. You don’t have to carry them around in order to study between classes. The Libraries have textbooks on reserve that you can check out for two hour increments. There are also some textbooks available online through the Libraries. It could save you significant money!
  3. Think outside your courses for fun options at the Libraries. The Libraries have resources well outside science and technology. The Libraries have videos and travel books. Check out my spring break post for more ideas.
  4. On a similar note, the Libraries can help you pursue your interests. The Lewis Library has concerts and open mics that could help nurture and preserve your interest in music. If art is more your style, the Libraries’ pass to the MFA allows you to take non-MIT friends along for free.
  5. Student jobs at the MIT Libraries are a fantastic way to make money and learn. There are many ways to get involved. From the student workers I interviewed, I really got the sense that working at the Libraries had become more than just a job. In my short time here I have learned a lot about blogging and felt a community among the Libraries’ staff. Check out my student jobs post.
  6. The libraries can make research less painful! For in-depth, longer-term research making an appointment with a librarian can go a long way. Subject matter experts can really push you in the right direction. See my post on research resources for more information.
  7. Research guides provide a quicker fix and concise information. They can be accessed online and cover a wide range of subjects. More information is available in the research resources post.
  8. One of the lesser known Libraries’ resources are the range of special events they host. During their IAPril series of events, I learned about using Mendeley software to manage PDFs and citations. There were also events on 3-D printing and business resources. Some events can be really surprising. For example, preservation week brought a letter locking event to MIT.
  9. Meet at least one librarian or staff member during your time at MIT. When I met Jana Dambrogio, I was amazed by her passion for letter locking, something I had never heard of. Not only are they incredible resources, but the Libraries’ staff have unique interests that are refreshing for someone immersed in science and technology.
  10. The Libraries’ scanners are fantastic. They create high quality images with no hassle. When I asked a few senior friends what they liked best, this was the most surprising answer.

I hope you’ve enjoyed reading my blog as much as I’ve enjoyed writing it! There’s an excellent video on this topic made by the Libraries and featuring students. Best of luck readers!

New! Access to the complete New Yorker

Posted May 30th, 2014 by Katherine McNeill

New Yorker cover image        

The current issue and all past issues of The New Yorker—going all the way back to very first in 1925—are now available to the MIT community through our subscription to The New Yorker Digital Archive.

You can read the magazine in its full-color glory anywhere you have a browser and an internet connection (try it on your iPad).  So if you’re traveling light this summer and have a hankering for “The Talk of the Town,” those sometimes uproarious, sometimes inscrutable cartoons, and a little Eustace Tilley, check out The New Yorker Digital Archive.

Discovering the Libraries: Archives and conservation

Posted May 30th, 2014 by Pritee Tembhekar

Hello everyone!

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Letters by William Barton Rogers

It has been a few weeks since I had the pleasure of visiting the Institute Archives and Conservation Lab, but I’m excited to write this belated post. This week’s post is about how the MIT Libraries preserve MIT’s rich history and how old, sensitive materials are treated and conserved for library users.

Most students know that William Barton Rogers founded the Institute in 1861. The details of MIT’s founding and early years are much less widely known. The MIT Libraries however has a surprisingly in-depth collection of materials relevant to MIT’s history. This includes letters that William Barton Rogers wrote, old student newspapers, and photographs of students and buildings. With the help of Nora Murphy, Archivist for Reference, Outreach and Instruction, I got a glimpse of some of the fascinating pieces in the archives.

One of the earliest and, in my opinion, most meaningful pieces was the letter by William Barton Rogers describing his vision for a technical institute. The letter is from 1846 and outlines parts of the MIT mission that are still with us today (right).

Many of the other artifacts give insight into life at MIT in the past. For example, going through old photobooks reveals the presence of international students very early in the Institute’s history (19th century students from China are present in photobooks). There are also pictures of MIT living quarters in the 1930s. Surprisingly, they don’t look starkly different from where we live today.

Important works of MIT students and faculty are also preserved here. I had the opportunity to see a chlorine level map made by Ellen Swallow Richards in the 1880s. Richards was the first female student admitted into MIT and subsequently the first female instructor here.  She is notable for her work in environmental chemistry and testing levels of various toxins in food and water. The MIT Archives has her work as well as some of her personal history. Richards appears in the journal of Louisa Hewins, which the Libraries has in their collection.

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Journal of Louisa Hewins featuring Ellen Swallow Richards (1880s)

A few of the pieces that I saw were just plain fun. For example, the class of ’84 yearbook (1884 that is) has fantastic photos of student organizations. The fencing team is shown below. It also has rosters of fraternity members.

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Fencing team photo in 1884 yearbook

The Tech from June 10, 1910 featured pictures of the Institute buildings and the president of the time. It’s interesting to see what made students of the time take notice.

I went on to see the Wunsch Conservation Lab in the MIT Libraries. Jana Dambrogio, the conservator, gave me an inside look into the life of a book in need of restoration. Jana’s specialty in recent years has been around letter locking, a practice by which letters were sent without an envelope. The letters are folded in different ways that hide the contents of the letter without using more (scarce) paper. It was refreshing to hear about a passion outside science and engineering. Jana explained to me the fine line between restoration of an artifact to its old state and preservation of “imperfections” with historical meaning. I got the chance to see an old work that is currently undergoing analysis.  Jana and her colleagues are looking into the structure of the book and drawing insights about how it was made.

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Tech newspaper from June 10, 1910

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Jana Dambrogio explains the structure of a book

I also met Kate Beattie who was doing a completely different kind of work preparing books for circulation to MIT users. It just goes to show the range of initiatives that the conservation lab engages in.

Thanks again to Jana Dambrogio and Nora Murphy for showing me around!

OA research in the news: Storms peaking further from tropics

Posted May 28th, 2014 by Katharine Dunn
image from the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

image from the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

A new study coauthored by an MIT faculty member shows that powerful tropical storms are peaking in intensity further away from the equator. The migration of these cyclones, hurricanes, and typhoons is significant in part because residents and infrastructure where the storms now make landfall may be unprepared for them and thus in more danger. As well, the authors write, these cyclones “have an important role in maintaining regional water resources, and a poleward migration of storm tracks could threaten potable water supplies in some regions while increasing flooding events in others.”

While the paper makes a link between the storms’ shift and global warming, coauthor Kerry Emanuel, a professor of atmospheric science in the department of Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences, says that researchers are continuing to examine this. Tropical winds have also expanded towards the poles in recent years. And, Emanuel told the MIT News, “as that belt migrates poleward, which surely it must as the whole ocean warms, the tropical cyclone genesis regions might just move with it. But we have more work to do to nail it down.”

Explore Professor Emanuel’s research in the Open Access Articles collection in DSpace@MIT, where it is openly accessible to the world.

Since the MIT faculty established their Open Access Policy in March 2009 they have made thousands of research papers freely available to the world via DSpace@MIT. To highlight that research, we’re offering a series of blog posts that link news stories about scholars’ work to their open access papers in DSpace.

Taking a trip this summer? We’ve got a guide book for you.

Posted May 21st, 2014 by Heather Denny

Jetting off this summer to some fabulous destination? Or just dreaming of places to go? If so, take a few moments to see if we have a guide book for your vacation spot. We have a Travel Collection in Hayden Library that now circulates for 60 days. This collection has expanded over the last year to include many new countries. Browse the collection, located on the second floor of Hayden near our Browsery, or search the Barton catalog by title.

Guidebooks for places like Africa, China, Italy, Morocco, Japan, Paris, San Francisco, and Washington DC (just to name a few) are already on the shelf. If you’re staying local this summer, we have guides to Boston and New England too.

If we are missing a location, you can suggest we purchase it.

Have questions?  Ask Us!

Two million downloads — a new open access milestone

Posted May 21st, 2014 by Ellen Duranceau

This month the MIT Faculty Open Access Policy hit a new milestone: papers made openly available through the Open Access Articles Collection have been downloaded over 2 million times. Total downloads from the collection of just under 12,000 papers reached 2,012,312 by the end of April, 2014.

This new watershed was reached just one year after celebrating the 1 millionth download — a new peak of one million downloads in one year.

Those are not the only new high water marks: In March, at the fifth anniversary of the faculty’s establishment of the Policy, monthly downloads reached over 100,000 for the first time:

oa downloads by month through april 2014

The downloads originate from across the globe, offering access to grateful readers from many walks of life.

More about the MIT Faculty Open Access Policy:

FAQ about the Policy
Deposit a paper under the Policy

Ellen Finnie Duranceau / Program Manager, Scholarly Publishing, Copyright, and Licensing / MIT Libraries

New! IBISWorld Specialized Industry Reports

Posted May 16th, 2014 by Katherine McNeill

IBISWorld logo

Ever found market research information via the IBISWorld database?  You now have even more!  The Libraries have just expanded our IBISWorld subscription to include their Specialized Industry Reports on niche and emerging industries.

Specialized Industry Reports cover the following industries:

  1. Advisory & financial services
  2. Business franchises
  3. Consumer goods & services (the most extensive category)
  4. Industrial machinery, gas & chemicals
  5. Life sciences
  6. Online retail
  7. Retail market (for selected products)
  8. Specialist engineering, infrastructure & contractors
  9. Technology

The database has approximately 600 Specialized Industry Reports and the collection is continually growing; this new coverage is in addition to their hundreds of in-depth reports on U.S., Chinese, and global industries.   To see the complete list and access the reports, go to IBISWorld.    Under Industry Market Research, select U.S. Specialized Industry Reports.

OA research in the news: The structure of onscreen feelings

Posted May 14th, 2014 by Katharine Dunn

The-Forms-of-the-AffectsCan lines, shapes, and colors express emotions in movies? In her new book, “The Forms of the Affects,” literature professor Eugenie Brinkema closely looks at these properties in films like “Psycho” and “Open Water” and argues that they do. In her view, emotions or “affect” need not only be observed by watching characters embody a feeling like anxiety or grief. Rather, Brinkema says that formal properties like repetition, duration, and lighting show the emotion themselves.

Take the film “Open Water,” in which a husband and wife are accidentally left behind in shark-infested waters during a scuba diving trip. The movie is frightening and anxiety producing, in part, says Brinkema, because of its visual frame. Most scenes show the sea and the sky with a horizontal line between them. As time goes on in the film, that line is interrupted by shark fins above and bodies disappearing below.

“The commonplace assumption is that spectators pay money to go to horror films because it will make us feel anxious, and then we cathartically leave the theater at the end of the day and feel fine. But what if [the film’s] anxiety has to do with the specific visual form of movement and time?” Brinkema told the MIT News.

Explore Professor Brinkema’s research in the Open Access Articles collection in DSpace@MIT, where it is openly accessible to the world. Brinkema also has a newly published course on MIT OpenCourseWare.

Since the MIT faculty established their Open Access Policy in March 2009 they have made thousands of research papers freely available to the world via DSpace@MIT. To highlight that research, we’re offering a series of blog posts that link news stories about scholars’ work to their open access papers in DSpace.

RSC, ACS offer new open access options for authors

Posted May 14th, 2014 by Katharine Dunn

In the last year, two major chemistry publishers have expanded their open access options.

The Royal Society of Chemistry continues to offer its “Gold for Gold” vouchers, launched in 2013, which allow authors to publish their otherwise “closed” articles as open access articles without charge. The Libraries receive a limited number of vouchers based on the cost of providing RSC journals at MIT, and we distribute them on a first-come, first-served basis. If you have an article in the RSC publication process now and would like to make it open access at no cost, email rscvouchers@mit.edu with your name, the title of your article, and the RSC journal you’re publishing in.

The American Chemical Society recently announced a new series of open access options for authors that include an open access journal, more flexible reuse licenses for articles, and, for the rest of 2014, free deposits of NIH-funded ACS articles to PubMed Central.

There are four main components to the ACS open access program:

  •  ACS Central Science, an open access, peer-reviewed journal to launch later this year, will publish 100-200 articles annually across the chemical sciences. There will be no subscription fees to read the articles, nor any author processing charges to publish in the journal unless authors want to distribute articles under a Creative Commons license. CC licenses allow authors to modify their copyright terms so that other people can use, share, or even build upon a work, depending on the license authors choose. Authors can distribute ACS Central Science articles under a Creative Commons Attribution license for a fee of $500 for ACS members and $1000 for non-members in 2014.
  • ACS AuthorChoice, in which authors pay a fee to make articles open access, has been available to authors for several years. In 2014 ACS expanded it so that authors can now choose immediate or 12-month embargoed (AuthorChoice+12) open access. Other changes include:
    • For NIH-funded authors: In 2014 ACS is giving authors a free AuthorChoice+12 license and will deposit the ACS version of record to PubMed Central on their behalf. Authors need to acknowledge NIH funding when they publish. Starting in 2015, authors will need to pay for a PMC deposit of the ACS version unless they use Author Rewards (see below).

      Note: There is never a charge for authors to deposit their final manuscripts to PMC themselves.
    • Authors can now choose one of three licenses when they pay for AuthorChoice or AuthorChoice+12: the standard ACS AuthorChoice license or one of two Creative Commons licenses. There are additional fees for the CC licenses.
  • ACS Author Rewards: The corresponding author of each ACS article published in 2014 will receive two credits of $750 that can be used (individually or combined) to offset charges to make new or previously published articles open access. The Author Rewards must be used by the end of 2017, and the eligible corresponding author can transfer credits to co-authors or other colleagues.
  • ACS Editor’s Choice: Each day, ACS makes one newly published, peer-reviewed article openly available to highlight work of public interest. The chosen articles can be read for free, and their authors receive ACS AuthorChoice publishing licenses for no fee.

For more information or to offer feedback on these options:

RSC’s Gold for Gold FAQ

ACS’s Open Access Initiatives FAQ

Erja Kajosalo, Chemistry & Chemical Engineering Librarian

Katharine Dunn, Scholarly Communications Librarian