Subject/Topic areas

DJing at a glance: Nov.4, 11am, Lewis Music Library

Posted October 22nd, 2014 by Christie Moore

dj_tnDJing at a Glance: The History of Beatmatching with Mmmmaven’s General Motor.

About the presenter:
General Motor (Gareth Middlebrook) works with all aspects of DJ technology, yet has a particular fondness for vinyl and old-school mixing and DJing. He has opened for some of the most cutting-edge DJs and producers in the world, including Ben UFO and Pearson Sound, in addition to keeping the beat in Boston for years.

Date: Tuesday, November 4, 2014
Place: Lewis Music Library, Bldg. 14E-109
Time: 11:00 am – 12:30 pm
Reception follows.

Readers worldwide benefit from MIT open access articles

Posted October 22nd, 2014 by Ellen Duranceau

The MIT faculty established their open access policy as an expression of their commitment “to disseminating the fruits of [their] research and scholarship as widely as possible,” and in the five years since the policy was established, readers have indeed been accessing MIT faculty articles from all around the world.

oa map oct 1 2010 through sept 2014 from oastats without bottom lines

Recent comments from readers across the globe reflect the value of this open access:

Graduate student, Uganda: “I am grateful for making your online information resources freely accessible. I am a graduate student of labour studies and have greatly benefited from your noble generosity.”

Private researcher, Australia: “[I am] a disabled engineer researching gravity and inertia… My research is hampered by one thing alone, paywalls.”

Undergraduate student, Brazil:
“I am most thankful to MIT for freely sharing so many articles, for this attitude not only helps scientific knowledge to be disseminated across the globe,” but it also “inspire[s] those students who, like myself, do not have a chance of paying for many of these publications. MIT is not only sharing knowledge, it is helping those in need on the pursuing of their dreams.”

Doctor and master’s degree student, Italy: “Your material is precious, thank you very much.”

Access is important in the US as well. An independent researcher and open source developer in the US comments that he and a colleague researching in the same area “can each make more progress on our own, and collaborate together, more effectively thanks to the availability of a critical article.”

More reader comments are posted on the scholarly publishing website.

This news is being shared in celebration of International Open Access Week.

Downloads of MIT open access articles exceed 2.4 million

Posted October 22nd, 2014 by Ellen Duranceau

Downloads of articles in the MIT Open Access Articles Collection, made available under the faculty’s open access policy, now total over 2,460,000.

Monthly downloads from the collection of 13,700 articles routinely top 90,000, following a new peak of over 101,000 downloads in March of this year.

oa downloads by month through sept 2014

These downloads reflect the faculty’s wish, as expressed in their open access policy, to “disseminat[e] the fruits of [their] research and scholarship as widely as possible.”

This news is being shared in celebration of International Open Access Week.

Lecture and workshop on Islamic geometric design

Posted October 21st, 2014 by Mark Szarko

pattern1The Aga Khan Documentation Center at MIT and the Aga Khan Program in Islamic Architecture at MIT are hosting a lecture and workshop on Islamic geometric design by Eric Broug. Eric Broug is an independent author and educator, specializing in Islamic geometric design. He is the author of a popular book “Islamic Geometric Patterns” and recently set up the Alhambra Foundation in the UK, dedicated to Islamic geometric design education.

In his lecture, Mr. Broug will address the topic “What Constitutes Excellence in Islamic Geometric Design? Historical and Contemporary Best Practice.”

Lecture date: Monday, November 3, 2014
Time: 6-7:30 pm
Location: Room 3-133

pattern2In the workshop, “A Practical Introduction to Islamic Geometric Design,” participants will use a pencil, straight edge, and a pair of compasses to make patterns using the same techniques used by craftsmen for centuries. Two patterns will be made: one from the Al-Aqsa Mosque in Jerusalem, another from the Al-Mustansariyya Madra­sa in Baghdad.

Workshop date: Tuesday, November 4, 2014
Time: 10 am-1 pm
Location: Room E25-117

Register (class is limited to 30)

For more information, contact the Aga Khan Documentation Center.

New web page summarizes major US research funder open access requirements

Posted October 17th, 2014 by Ellen Duranceau

As part of an effort to provide information about new open access requirements that are emerging from the White House Directive on “Expanding Public Access to the Results of Federally Funded Research,” the MIT Libraries will be tracking each agency’s requirements on a new web page.

screen shot research funder table

The requirements of the Department of Energy, the first agency to release its Public Access Plan, are included, as are other existing policies, such as the NIH Public Access Policy, as well as the NSF’s existing policy on data management plans.

doe logo

US federal agencies with more than $100 Million annually in R&D will be issuing their open access requirements in coming months, and those policies will be summarized on this web page as details become available.

If you have questions about open access requirements:

  • For publications, contact Ellen Finnie Duranceau, Program Manager, Scholarly Publishing, Copyright, and Licensing, MIT Libraries
  • For data, contact datamanagement@mit.edu.

  • This news is being shared in celebration of International Open Access Week.

    An Open Access Week event: Chemistry societies and open access — new options for authors

    Posted October 17th, 2014 by Ellen Duranceau
    OA speakers

    Pictured above, L to R from top: Professor Christopher Cummins; Jennifer Griffiths, RSC; Mary Yess, ECS; Kevin Davies, ACS

    In honor of International Open Access Week, the MIT Libraries are sponsoring a panel discussion on October 24 which will give authors an opportunity to hear directly from three chemistry societies about their new open access publishing options, and future plans.

    Please join us for this panel:

    Date: October 24, 2014
    Time: 12:00-1:00
    Location: Room 2-105
    Refreshments: a light lunch will be available at 11:45.

    Each of these societies has recently expanded their open access programs, and has announced new ways for authors to make their journal articles openly accessible.

    The panel will be moderated by Steve Gass, Interim Director of Libraries, and will include:

    • Professor of Chemistry Christopher Cummins, who will offer his perspective as an MIT author and Associate Editor for the journal Chemical Science (published by the Royal Society of Chemistry).
    • American Chemical Society: Kevin Davies, VP of business development.
    • Electrochemical Society: Mary Yess, Deputy Executive Director/Chief Content Officer & Publisher.
    • Royal Society of Chemistry: Jennifer Griffiths, Editorial Development Manager for North America.

    Short remarks from each speaker will be followed by a discussion.

    Ellen Finnie Duranceau, Program Manager, Scholarly Publishing, Copyright, and Licensing, MIT Libraries

    OA research in the news: Autism as a disorder of prediction

    Posted October 15th, 2014 by Katharine Dunn
    Pawan Sinha

    Pawan Sinha

    In a paper published this month, MIT researchers suggest that many of the varied symptoms that characterize autism may be explained by a difficulty with making predictions. The ability to predict is fundamental to tasks as diverse as adjusting to sensory stimuli and inferring other’s mental states based on the context. When prediction is compromised, a person lives in a “seemingly ‘magical’ world wherein events occur unexpectedly and without cause,” write the authors, who include professors Pawan Sinha and Richard Held from the Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences. Impaired predictive skills can make the world feel overwhelming and may lead to some of the behaviors linked to autism, such as repetitive behavior or difficulty gauging social situations.

    In devising their hypothesis, the researchers reviewed more than 100 studies and accounts of autism over more than three decades, with the goal of finding a common and coherent basis for the disorder. A new theory of autism could help researchers design to more effective therapies to treat it.

    “At the moment, the treatments that have been developed are driven by the end symptoms. We’re suggesting that the deeper issue is a predictive difficulty, which may, therefore, be a better target for interventions,” says Sinha.

    Explore Professor Sinha’s research in the Open Access Articles collection in DSpace@MIT, where it is openly accessible to the world.

    Since the MIT faculty established their Open Access Policy in March 2009 they have made thousands of research papers freely available to the world via DSpace@MIT. To highlight that research, we’re offering a series of blog posts that link news stories about scholars’ work to their open access papers in DSpace.

    The Springer Book Archive (SBA) is here!

    Posted October 14th, 2014 by Chris Sherratt

    springer

    You may know that for several years, MIT Libraries has had online books (2005+) from the prolific publisher Springer. Now we are pleased to announce the addition of approximately 47,320 more e-books across all fields of engineering, math, physics, life sciences, social sciences and more…through Springerlink!

    Most of the titles in SBA were published between 1980 and 2005, but it does include some older books, such as Very’s Prize Essay on the Distribution of the Moon’s Heat and its Variation with the Phase (1891) and Economics Aspects of Immigration (1954). And, as before, you can still download chapters or whole books; great for a community on the go.

    Another great service available to MIT is Springer’s MyCopy: a chance to buy a sturdy paperbound copy of a book for $24.99 regardless of the current price: Bargains!

    Contact Michael Noga for further information, and enjoy your new access to older Springer books!

    authors@mit reading by Ellen Harris

    Posted October 8th, 2014 by Patsy Baudoin

    *Handel_ok jacket.inddCome hear Ellen Harris read from and discuss her latest book, George Frideric Handel: A Life with Friends, published just this month by W. W. Norton & Company.

    Ellen T. Harris, professor emerita at MIT, formerly the Class of 1949 Professor of Music, was MIT’s first associate provost for the arts. She is an internationally recognized scholar in Baroque opera, specializing in the music of Handel and Purcell. She is also a performing soprano.

    Wednesday, October 22nd, 2014

    5:30 pm

    Lewis Music Library (Bldg. 14E, 160 Memorial Drive)

    Refreshments will be served.

    Free & open to the public – Questions? Contact: (617) 253-5249

    authors@mit is a co-sponsored by the MIT Libraries and the MIT Press Bookstore

     

    OA research in the news: Study shows “substantial learning” in MOOC

    Posted October 1st, 2014 by Katharine Dunn
    by Ilonka Hebels, licensed under under CC-BY-NC-SA 2.0

    by Ilonka Hebels, licensed under under CC-BY-NC-SA 2.0

    Massive open online courses, or MOOCs, appear to be thriving. Want to hear about the “violent universe” from faculty at the Australian National University? Or take an introductory class on the music business from the renowned Berklee College of Music? These and hundreds of other courses have been offered on platforms like edX, Coursera, or Udacity in the two-and-a-half years since edX ran one of the first MOOCs out of MIT. Enticed by personal or professional edification, as well as the by the cost (free), thousands of people worldwide have signed up for online classes.

    But are MOOC students learning anything?

    This question has been little explored in the online teaching arena. Now, researchers including MIT physics professor David Pritchard, have published a study showing “substantial learning” in an edX MOOC. Using pretest and posttest questions, as well as analyzing homework and test results throughout the course, the researchers found that online students improved as well as or better than those in previously studied traditional classes.

    Explore Professor Pritchard’s research in the Open Access Articles collection in DSpace@MIT, where it is openly accessible to the world.

    Since the MIT faculty established their Open Access Policy in March 2009 they have made thousands of research papers freely available to the world via DSpace@MIT. To highlight that research, we’re offering a series of blog posts that link news stories about scholars’ work to their open access papers in DSpace.

    New Handel book by Ellen T. Harris

    Posted September 23rd, 2014 by Christie Moore

    handelcover_harris_tnJust in:
    George Frideric Handel: a Life with Friends, by MIT Professor Emeritus Ellen T. Harris
    (ML410.H13 H279 2014)

    Save the date to hear Professor Harris talk about the book at the authors@mit event on Oct.22!

    OECD coming to MIT

    Posted September 23rd, 2014 by Katherine McNeill

    OECD logo

    The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) is coming to MIT!  Join us to:

    • increase your knowledge of the world
    • get a leg up on your job search
    • enjoy some refreshments!

    Join the Libraries for an event co-hosted by MIT Economics major Caroline Shinkle, the first-ever MIT student to be selected by the OECD to be a Student Ambassador. In this role, Caroline is raising awareness about the OECD within the MIT community.

    When: Thursday, October 9, 2014, 3-4PM
    Where: 14N-132
    Register
    Refreshments served

    Kathleen DeBoer, Deputy Head of the OECD Washington Center, will present about the OECD iLibrary (http://libraries.mit.edu/get/oecd), including:

    • Information the OECD provides on countries around the world, in areas such as:
      • Development
      • Employment
      • Energy
      • Environment
      • Trade
      • and more…
    •  How to efficiently extract data from their vast array of statistics

    Note: For those interested in working for the OECD, Ms. DeBoer will be available to meet in the afternoon before and after the presentation to discuss the application process. If interested, contact her at Kathleen.DEBOER@oecd.org.

    The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) provides a forum in which governments can work together to share experiences and seek solutions to common problems. Today, 34 OECD member countries worldwide regularly turn to one another to identify problems, discuss and analyse them, and promote policies to solve them. It is one of the largest economics publishers in the world.

    Chemistry societies and open access: new options for authors

    Posted September 22nd, 2014 by Ellen Duranceau
    OA speakers

    Pictured above, L to R from top: Professor Christopher Cummins; Jennifer Griffiths, RSC; Mary Yess, ECS; Kevin Davies, ACS

    The MIT Libraries are sponsoring a panel discussion on October 24 which will give authors an opportunity to hear directly from three chemistry societies about their new open access publishing options, and future plans.

    Each of these societies has recently expanded their open access programs, and has announced new ways for authors to make their journal articles openly accessible.

    The panel will be moderated by Steve Gass, Interim Director of Libraries, and will include:

    • Professor of Chemistry Christopher Cummins, who will offer his perspective as an MIT author and Associate Editor for the journal Chemical Science (published by the Royal Society of Chemistry).
    • American Chemical Society: Kevin Davies, VP of business development.
    • Electrochemical Society: Mary Yess, Deputy Executive Director/Chief Content Officer & Publisher.
    • Royal Society of Chemistry: Jennifer Griffiths, Editorial Development Manager for North America.

    Short remarks from each speaker will be followed by a discussion.

    Please join us for this panel, held in honor of International Open Access Week:

    Date: October 24, 2014
    Time: 12:00-1:00
    Location: Room 2-105
    Refreshments: a light lunch will be available at 11:45.

    OA research in the news: Bhatia wins Lemelson-MIT Prize

    Posted September 17th, 2014 by Katharine Dunn
    Sangeeta Bhatia

    Sangeeta Bhatia

    Biomedical engineer and professor Sangeeta Bhatia has been awarded the 2014 Lemelson-MIT Prize, worth $500,000, which goes to mid-career inventors with a commitment to mentoring others and bettering the world with their work. Bhatia was cited for building “tiny technologies” in medicine that address complex problems in areas like drug toxicity, tissue regeneration, cancer therapeutics, and infectious disease. Among her inventions is a paper urine test for detecting cancer that has been adapted for use in developing areas.

    Explore Professor Bhatia’s research in the Open Access Articles collection in DSpace@MIT, where it is openly accessible to the world.

    Since the MIT faculty established their Open Access Policy in March 2009 they have made thousands of research papers freely available to the world via DSpace@MIT. To highlight that research, we’re offering a series of blog posts that link news stories about scholars’ work to their open access papers in DSpace.

    Met Opera on Demand is here!

    Posted September 17th, 2014 by Christie Moore

    metoperaMet Opera on Demand is now available to members of the MIT community (5 simultaneous users; MIT certificates needed). Enjoy video and audio opera performances from the stage of the Metropolitan Opera in New York, spanning more than 75 years of the company’s broadcast history.

    Persistent URL: libraries.mit.edu/get/metopera

    Back-To-School on Energy

    Posted September 16th, 2014 by Chris Sherratt

    For many, September is the season of picking up where you left off, recapping what you already know, and/or taking research and learning in different directions. Next week the MIT Energy Club hosts its annual Energy Week, and in honor of the vast teaching and research around so many aspects of energy at MIT, here are a few of the Libraries great resources:

    Comprehensive Renewable Energy, a one stop place to brush up on the basics of all things renewable! Want to see our new books without leaving your office?  Easy. And don’t forget the best place to start:  The Libraries Research Guide to Energy, where links to databases and statistics, like those from the IEA, abound! Finally, one of our newest database, CAB Abstracts, will bring you reports of energy development in rural places all around the world.

    Enjoy the energy of MIT!

     

    New covers for our new and old books

    Posted September 16th, 2014 by willer

    20140916_colibriYou might notice new covers in the library stacks this fall. The Curation and Preservation Services department is proud to introduce a new treatment for those lightly-worn books in our collection.

    Please meet the CoLibri cover system jacket. These clear polyethylene jackets are an inexpensive way to give slightly damaged items a longer life on the shelf before having to either rebind or replace them. There are many options for repairing books, and this is just one of them, so stay tuned for future posts.

    Open mics – save the dates!

    Posted September 10th, 2014 by Christie Moore

    pianoLibrary music! The open mic events are returning on the first Fridays of October, November, and December. Here’s your chance to play our piano or your own instrument. Free audience supplied for all performers.

    Dates: Friday, October 3, 2014 — Friday, November 7 — Friday, December 5
    Place: Lewis Music Library, Bldg. 14E-109
    Time: noon- 1 pm
    Refreshments provided.

    Telegraphy exhibit opens in the Maihaugen Gallery

    Posted September 8th, 2014 by Heather Denny

    linemenWired: A World Transformed by the Telegraph, an exhibition highlighting the Libraries’ special collections in telegraphy, recently opened in the Maihaugen Gallery (14N-130).

    Until the mid-19th century, most messages could travel across long distances only as quickly as they could be physically carried. Audiovisual systems such as smoke, flags, drums, beacons, and gunshots were cumbersome and severely limited in their sophistication and speed.

    The electric telegraph changed all that. The ability to communicate instantaneously across entire continents – and even oceans – heralded the birth of telecommunications.

    The current exhibition introduces a rich and varied collection of materials on the electric telegraph and its impact on the world. The collection is a gift of Thomas F. Peterson, Jr. (MIT 1957), who also made a generous donation to process and catalog its contents.

    The exhibit includes telegrams, images, books, video, and ephemera that chart the birth of a huge industry, and reveal how business, warfare, social interactions, and even the arts were affected by this transformational technology.

    Visit the Maihaugen Gallery Monday–Friday, 10 a.m.–4 p.m.

    Zoom portable audio recorders

    Posted September 4th, 2014 by Christie Moore

    zoomFive Zoom portable audio recorders are now available in the Lewis Music Library for 1-day circulation to MIT students, faculty, or staff. Each carrying case contains the recorder and accessories including earbuds, USB cable, power adapter, rechargable batteries, and 1-page recording guide.

    The Zooms were suggested by music faculty and funded by the Class of 1982 Music Library Fund.

    The Lewis Music Library is located in Bldg. 14E-109 and library hours are posted on the web.