Podcasts

New Podcast: George Stiny on “The Secret Formula is this: Copy!”

Posted October 24th, 2012 by Ellen Duranceau

The latest in the series of podcasts on scholarly publication and copyright is an interview with George Stiny, Professor of Design and Computation in the Department of Architecture at MIT, and a member of the faculty committee that put forward the Open Access Policy for a faculty vote in March of 2009. He addresses the problem of copyright in relation to the design process from his perspective as an artist, designer, mathematician, philosopher, and programmer.

In the podcast, Professor Stiny speaks about the importance of appropriation in design. His comments hint at the limitations of the perspective copyright law offers on copying, for disciplines that necessarily and inevitably build on the work of others.

Art, Professor Stiny says, “is about using what you see around you in a new and fresh way, and if that means copying, that means copying.” He tells the story of his daughter, a young artist, who copied a van Gogh painting, even down to the artist’s signature. When he asked why she hadn’t signed her own name, his daughter said, with a smile, “Next time I will.” That is perfectly appropriate, Professor Stiny says, because “her copy added things to it that were fresh and new and let her see it in a new way…that is the source of art.”

His advice to students, the makers of tomorrow’s culture, is “don’t be afraid of copying.” Indeed, he says, copying is “the secret formula” in art and design, and is “as original and creative as anything else we do.”

Download the audio file. (8:43 minutes)
Listening to other podcasts in the series

This news is being reported in celebration of the third anniversary of the Open Access Articles Collection, which houses papers under the MIT Faculty Open Access Policy, and global Open Access Week, which runs from October 22 through 26.

More information:
Professor Stiny on the Copy in Copyright
Other podcasts in the series

To subscribe to the MIT Libraries’ Podcasts on Scholarly Publishing, paste this link into iTunes or another podcast reader: http://feeds.rapidfeeds.com/6772/

New Podcast: Craig Carter on the MIT Faculty Open Access Policy

Posted February 1st, 2010 by Ellen Duranceau

The latest in the series of podcasts on scholarly publication and copyright is an interview with Craig Carter, Professor of Materials Science and Engineering. He directs the Carter Research Group, which uses modeling to predict complex material behavior.

In the podcast, Professor Carter speaks about the MIT Faculty Open Access Policy from his perspective as a member of the faculty committee that put the policy forward for a faculty vote in March of 2009. Under the policy, the faculty gives MIT nonexclusive permission to make the faculty’s scholarly articles available and to exercise the copyright in those articles for the purpose of open dissemination.

He reflects on the “swiftness with which [the committee] reached consensus” about changes needed in the publishing environment, and his belief that “participation in the [policy] will help us do our job better by allowing us to freely distribute our works.”

Download the audio file. (5:32 minutes)

More information:

To subscribe to the MIT Libraries’ Podcasts on Scholarly Publishing, paste this link into iTunes or another podcast reader: http://feeds.rapidfeeds.com/6772/

We encourage and welcome your feedback, which you may direct to copyright-lib@mit.edu.

New Podcast: Professor JoAnne Yates on Making MIT Sloan Teaching Materials Openly Available

Posted March 16th, 2009 by Ellen Duranceau

The latest in the series of podcasts on scholarly publication and copyright is an interview with Professor JoAnne Yates, Sloan Distinguished Professor of Management and Deputy Dean of the MIT Sloan School of Management. She speaks about the new MIT Sloan website that offers case studies, teaching videos, and other innovative instructional resources openly to anyone with access to the internet.
Professor JoAnne Yates
Professor Yates explains why MIT Sloan Teaching Innovation Resources (MSTIR) is an open access site, what is innovative about its approach and content, and why it matters for business education. She reflects on the decision-making that went into offering the content openly, commenting that “the notion of giving it away to the world seemed to us the right notion,” even though some people at other business schools “wanted to know whether we were crazy” for giving this content away when other schools charge for it. She addresses this in the context of Sloan’s mission to develop “principled leaders who make a positive difference in the world,” noting that Sloan’s focus is unusual among business schools in that it includes “bettering the planet.”

The growing site will include innovative tools such as “management flight simulators” — dynamic models that demonstrate how intuitions are often wrong, and material for underserved content areas like global entrepreneurship, industry evolution, and sustainability.

Professor Yates, a member of the Ad-hoc Faculty Committee on Open Access Publishing, links the decision to make the content open access to MIT’s culture of openness and experience with OpenCourseWare. She says “I’m very proud of the fact that MIT makes all this material open to the world and that we started that [OpenCourseWare] movement… MIT… understands it owes something to the world and it tries to give back to the world. That’s something that makes many of us who work here very proud. It’s easy to want to follow in these footsteps.”

Download the audio file. (20:56 minutes; 19MB)

For more information, see the MSTIR site.


The other episodes in the podcast series are available on the scholarly publication website.

To subscribe to the MIT Libraries’ Podcasts on Scholarly Publishing, paste this link into iTunes or another podcast reader: http://feeds.rapidfeeds.com/6772/

We encourage and welcome your feedback, which you may direct to copyright-lib@mit.edu.

New Podcast: MacKenzie Smith on Endnote vs. Zotero: the Business End of Citation Management Software

Posted November 6th, 2008 by Ellen Duranceau

The latest in the series of podcasts on scholarly publication and copyright is an interview with MacKenzie Smith, Associate Director for Technology in the MIT Libraries. MacKenzie discusses the lawsuit that Thomson Reuters, owner of the proprietary bibliographic management software EndNote, has pursued against George Mason University and the Commonwealth of Virginia in relation to their open-source tool, Zotero.

She provides an overview of the details of the claims in the case, and shares her views on the implications of the lawsuit for universities and scholars.

Download the audio file. (9:12 minutes; 8.4MB)

For more information, see MacKenzie’s blog story on this same topic.


The other episodes in the podcast series are available on the scholarly publication website.

To subscribe to the MIT Libraries’ Podcasts on Scholarly Publishing, paste this link into iTunes or another podcast reader: http://feeds.rapidfeeds.com/6772/

We encourage and welcome your feedback, which you may direct to copyright-lib@mit.edu.

New Podcast: Gari Clifford on Choosing Open Publication Models that Support Authors and Readers

Posted September 26th, 2008 by Ellen Duranceau

The latest in the series of podcasts on scholarly publication and copyright is an interview with Dr. Gari Clifford, Principal Research Scientist and Instructor in Biomedical Engineering in the Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences & Technology, and Engineering Manager for the Laboratory for Computational Physiology at MIT.

In the podcast, Dr. Clifford explores themes related to author rights and open access that have emerged in his experience with scholarly publishing. In particular, he explains why he prefers to publish in open access journals, what problems he sees with the journal publishing system, and his view that the choice of journal is “as important as the research itself.”

Download the audio file. (18:58 minutes)


The other episodes in the podcast series are available on the scholarly publication website.

To subscribe to the MIT Libraries’ Podcasts on Scholarly Publishing, paste this link into iTunes or another podcast reader: http://feeds.rapidfeeds.com/6772/

We encourage and welcome your feedback, which you may direct to copyright-lib@mit.edu.

New Podcast: Professor Dan Ariely on his book “Predictably Irrational” and Scholarly Publishing

Posted July 22nd, 2008 by Ellen Duranceau

The latest in the series of podcasts on scholarly publication and copyright is an interview with Dan Ariely, who was Alfred P. Sloan Professor of Behavioral Economics here at MIT, until very recently, when he moved to Duke University, where he is now James B. Duke Professor of Behavioral Economics.

Professor Ariely recently published the best-selling book Predictably Irrational: The Hidden Forces that Shape our Decisions, in which he undermines any notion we might have that humans make “rational” decisions. His book reports on his research showing that emotions, context, social norms, and related factors drive our decisions – and that we are irrational in predictable ways.

In the podcast, Professor Ariely speaks with us about how market and social norms intersect with authors’ decision-making in an evolving system of scholarly communication and publishing. He discusses reward systems, the importance of building an accessible community of knowledge, and the need to lower barriers for information sharing.

Download the audio file. (20:02 minutes)


The other episodes in the podcast series are available on the scholarly publication website.

To subscribe to the MIT Libraries’ Podcasts on Scholarly Publishing, paste this link into iTunes or another podcast reader: http://feeds.rapidfeeds.com/6772/

We encourage and welcome your feedback, which you may direct to copyright-lib@mit.edu.

New Podcast: Professor George Stiny on the “Copy” in Copyright

Posted May 6th, 2008 by Ellen Duranceau

The latest in the series of podcasts on scholarly publication and copyright is an interview with George Stiny, Professor of Computation in the Department of Architecture at MIT.

stiny.jpg

Professor Stiny explains the significance of copying in the design process from his unusual perspective – a perspective that blends art and design with calculating. Professor Stiny invented shape grammars – the idea of identifying and quantifying a set of rules that can generate an infinite range of designs, much the way rules of grammar in language can generate an infinite range of sentences. His work uses mathematics to capture the creative, generative language of shapes and design.

Download the audio file. (14:42 minutes; 13.5 MB)


The other episodes in the podcast series are available on the scholarly publication website. To subscribe to the MIT Libraries’ Podcasts on Scholarly Publishing, paste this link into iTunes or another podcast reader: http://feeds.rapidfeeds.com/6772/

We encourage and welcome your feedback, which you may direct to copyright-lib@mit.edu.

New Podcast: Hal Abelson on Supporting Our Intellectual Commons

Posted April 2nd, 2008 by Ellen Duranceau

hal.gifThe latest in the series of podcasts on scholarly publication and copyright is an interview with Hal Abelson, Class of 1922 Professor of Computer Science and Engineering in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT.

Professor Abelson has played key roles in fostering educational technology initiatives such MIT’s OpenCourseWare and DSpace. He has a broad interest in information technology and policy,  and developed and teaches the course “Ethics and Law on the Electronic Frontier.”  He was a founding director of Creative Commons, Public Knowledge, and the Free Software Foundation, organizations that are devoted to strengthening our intellectual commons.

In the podcast, Professor Abelson reflects on the origins and impacts of these efforts, his reasons for remaining committed to more open access to research, and the concerns he has about the future.

Download the audio file. (22:53 minutes; 21 MB)


The other episodes in the podcast series are available on the scholarly publication website.To subscribe to the MIT Libraries’ Podcasts on Scholarly Publishing, paste this link into iTunes or another podcast reader: http://feeds.rapidfeeds.com/6772/

We encourage and welcome your feedback, which you may direct to copyright-lib@mit.edu.

New Podcast: Professor Lienhard on his Open Access Textbook

Posted February 25th, 2008 by Ellen Duranceau

In the new episode in the series of podcasts on scholarly publication and copyright, we hear from Professor John H. Lienhard V, Professor of Mechanical Engineering here at MIT.

lienhard.jpg

Professor Lienhard’s research interests include Heat and Mass Transfer and Fluid Mechanics, among other areas. He is the recipient of several teaching awards at MIT as well as research awards from the American Society of Mechanical Engineers.

He speaks about making his text book — the 3rd edition of A Heat Transfer Textbook — openly available on the web, with no charge to readers. This text was coauthored with Professor Lienhard’s father, John Lienhard IV, who is a professor at the University of Houston. It was published by Prentice Hall in two print editions in the 1980s, and remained in print until the mid 1990s.

In the podcast, Professor Lienhard, whose goal was to “explore the impact that free textbooks could have on higher education,” reflects on how the project came about and what it has meant to those who have downloaded the text, as well as to him.

Download the audio file. (15:10 minutes; 11.1 MB)

Beyond the podcast: More about A Heat Transfer Textbook

Professor Lienhard’s experiment was a remarkable innovation at the time. Certainly its astounding success could not have been foreseen back in 2001, when he and his father launched the open access version. That was before ebooks were widespread, before OpenCourseWare had made the idea of freely accessible educational materials a hot topic, and when internet connections were still slow enough that it took quite a commitment to download the 8 – 10 MB book. Yet the downloads built quickly and the rate has not let up.

One of the unexpected outcomes of this experiment with open textbook publishing was that the freely downloadable 3rd edition reached a completely different and much larger audience than the first two print editions had. The Prentice Hall editions were not marketed internationally, and the buyers were largely American college students, and American college professors. Professor Lienhard estimates that the sales were perhaps 10,000 for each of the first two print editions, a very respectable number for a printed textbook.

In contrast, the open access version has been downloaded more than 150,000 times from more than 150 countries — so the scale of the audience has increased by an order of magnitude. The recipients of the open access version are not primarily American students or professors; they are practicing engineers in the U.S. and elsewhere, and, to an overwhelming extent, students in the developing world who have little to no access to quality textbooks in engineering and science. Professor Lienhard discusses the moving testimonials he’s received from these students in the podcast.


The other episodes in the podcast series are available on the scholarly publication website. To subscribe to the MIT Libraries’ Podcasts on Scholarly Publishing, paste this link into iTunes or another podcast reader: http://feeds.rapidfeeds.com/6772/

We encourage and welcome your feedback, which you may direct to copyright-lib@mit.edu.

New Podcast: John Wilbanks on Barriers to the Flow of Scientific Knowledge

Posted February 5th, 2008 by Ellen Duranceau

In the latest in the series of podcasts on topics related to scholarly publication and copyright, the Executive Director of Science Commons, John Wilbanks, discusses how and why Science Commons is working to improve the flow of scientific knowledge so that complex scientific, technical, and medical problems can be solved more quickly.

Download the audio file (14:35 minutes; 13.9MB)

wilbanks.jpg


Following the recorded interview, Wilbanks agreed to answer just one more question, which we did not have time to include in the recording: Ellen Duranceau: I understand you majored in Philosophy as an undergrad. Is there is particular philosopher’s work that you draw upon to support his efforts with ScienceCommons?

Wilbanks responds: “Philosophy has turned out to be directly relevant to our work at Science Commons – the principles behind the Semantic Web are essentially the same as those investigated for centuries by philosophers from Hume to Plantinga. In terms of influence, I could list a dozen philosophers that have influenced one element or another of our work. I know that Thinh Nguyen, our counsel, is deeply influenced by the work of Daniel Dennett (and everyone involved in science should read Dennett’s “Darwin’s Dangerous Idea“). But I’m probably most influenced overall by Thomas Kuhn, who wrote “Structure of Scientific Revolutions” and introduced the idea of the paradigm shift.

Now, paradigm shift is a devalued phrase today. It is justly mocked in commercials and cartoons (the Simpsons do it justice above all) as a catch phrase for managers without a clue. And “Structure” is not a thrilling read. But the core arguments about how ideas emerge in science, are beaten down by the establishment, and have to force general changes in the overall knowledge structure of science – those arguments resonate deeply with me. And a huge part of what we’re trying to do at Science Commons is enable the overall acceleration of the cycles Kuhn describes, to make it faster and faster and faster for ideas that deserve to emerge to emerge, and to let as many people into the process as want to be there.

This mix of accelerating research cycles and increasing participation in science through lowered barriers means that we get more revolutions, faster. It’s one of the only non-miraculous approaches available to us. We need theoretical breakthroughs in fields across the sciences, we need more revolutions, and Science Commons is trying to deploy the infrastructure of knowledge and that can make those revolutions easier to achieve.”


The other episodes in the podcast series are available on the scholarly publication website. To subscribe to the MIT Libraries’ Podcasts on Scholarly Publishing, paste this link into iTunes or another podcast reader: http://feeds.rapidfeeds.com/6772/

We encourage and welcome your feedback, which you may direct to copyright-lib@mit.edu.

New Podcast: Tracy Gabridge on Assessing the Vulnerability of Conference Proceedings

Posted January 22nd, 2008 by Ellen Duranceau

tracygabridge.jpg

In the new episode in the series of podcasts on scholarly publication and copyright, Tracy Gabridge, Associate Head of the Barker Engineering Library (as well as a graduate of MIT), speaks about a project she is leading in which a group of librarians is determining which conferences MIT Engineering faculty publish in, whether the MIT Libraries have access to the proceedings from these conferences, and whether the digital access appears to be vulnerable.

Download the audio file. (14:35 minutes; 10.2MB)

The other episodes in the podcast series are available on the scholarly publication website.

To subscribe to the MIT Libraries’ Podcasts on Scholarly Publishing, paste this link into iTunes or another podcast reader:

http://feeds.rapidfeeds.com/6772/

This is the first series of podcasts created by the Libraries specifically for this format. We encourage and welcome your feedback, which you may direct to copyright-lib@mit.edu.

New Podcast: Professor Kai von Fintel on the Launch of a New Open Access Journal in Linguistics

Posted December 21st, 2007 by Ellen Duranceau

The fourth episode in a new series of podcasts on various aspects of scholarly publishing & copyright is now available.


In this episode, we hear from Professor Kai von Fintel, Professor of Linguistics at MIT, whose research areas are in semantics, pragmatics, and philosophy of language, and the intersections among them.

Professor von Fintel discusses the launch of a new open access journal, Semantics and Pragmatics, with co-editor David Beaver of the University of Texas at Austin. The podcast was recorded at a critical moment in the journal’s history, a few weeks after its website was launched and opened for submissions, and a few months before the first papers are expected to appear there, in early 2008.

Download the Audio File (11:11 minutes; 10.3MB)

More information about Professor von Fintel’s open access journal is available at the Semantic and Pragmatics website, which includes a blog by the editors. A previous MIT Libraries’ blog story also contains more information.

The other episodes in the podcast series are available on the scholarly publication website.

To subscribe to the MIT Libraries’ Podcasts on Scholarly Publishing, paste this link into iTunes or another podcast reader:

http://feeds.rapidfeeds.com/6772/

This is the first series of podcasts created by the Libraries specifically for this format. We encourage and welcome your feedback as the series evolves. If you have any feedback, please direct it to copyright-lib@mit.edu.

New Podcast: Professor Eric von Hippel on Openness, Innovation, and Scholarly Publishing

Posted October 30th, 2007 by Ellen Duranceau

The third episode in a new series of podcasts on various aspects of scholarly publishing & copyright is now available.


In the new episode, we hear from Professor Eric von Hippel, T Wilson Professor of Management at the MIT Sloan School of Management and Professor of Engineering Systems at MIT. He specializes in research related to the nature and economics of distributed and open innovation.

Professor von Hippel speaks about his experiment with making two of his books openly available on his website at no cost to the reader, and about the broader issue of how the economics of innovation are increasingly favoring open, unrestricted internet access, including in scholarly publishing.

Download the Audio File (8:33 minutes)

More information about Professor von Hippel’s experiment with making his books openly available on the web was offered in a previous story.

The other episodes in the podcast series are available on the scholarly publication website.

To subscribe to the MIT Libraries’ Podcasts on Scholarly Publishing, paste this link into iTunes or another podcast reader:

http://feeds.rapidfeeds.com/6772/

This is the first series of podcasts created by the Libraries specifically for this format. We encourage and welcome your feedback as the series evolves. If you have any feedback, please direct it to copyright-lib@mit.edu.

Libraries Launch Scholarly Publishing & Copyright Podcast Series

Posted September 18th, 2007 by Ellen Duranceau

The MIT Libraries are offering a new podcast series on scholarly publishing and copyright. Two episodes are available:

In “Transforming Scientific Communication,” Steve Gass, Head of Public Services, describes some problems with the existing model for scholarly publishing and offers his vision of positive changes that could be made.

Download the audio file. (6:27 minutes, 6 Mb)

In “Making a Difference: Pushing Back on DRM at MIT,” Anna Gold, Head of the Engineering and Science Libraries, tells the story of MIT’s rejection of Digital Rights Management technology when it was being imposed by a scholarly society for use of its technical papers here at MIT.

Download the audio file. (8:18 minutes, 7.7 Mb)

To subscribe to the MIT Libraries’ Podcasts on Scholarly Publishing, paste this link into iTunes or another podcast reader:

http://feeds.rapidfeeds.com/6772/

This is the first series of podcasts created by the Libraries specifically for this format. We encourage and welcome your feedback as the series evolves.

Please direct your comments to copyright-lib@mit.edu. For more information on scholarly publishing & copyright, please visit the Libraries’ Scholarly Publication website.

Video available of Wikipedia class

Posted June 20th, 2007 by Nicole Hennig

WikipediaA video is now available of an interesting class that took place in January during IAP.

The event, “Why Not Wikipedia, and when?” was run by Chris Capozzola, Amy Stout, and Brian Keegan. Panelists discussed pros and cons, experiences as Wikipedia users and contributers, Wikipedia in the classroom, and implications for research. For more information, see the class description.

Download the quicktime video. (1.5 hours, 623.7 Mb)

Video available of Diana Henderson author reading

Posted December 12th, 2006 by Nicole Hennig

A video is now available of a recent authors@mit event. Diana Henderson discusses her book, Collaborations with the Past. For more info on this event see authors@mit presents Diana Henderson.

Download the video. (1 hour, 38 minutes) (606.4 Mb)

Authors@mit event from 2005 available for downloading: William Mitchell, Placing Words

Posted December 12th, 2006 by Nicole Hennig

The recording of a previous authors@mit event is now available for downloading.

Placing Words: symbols, space, and the city: William Mitchell, 2005.

Download mp3. (1 hour, 11 minutes) (32.8 Mb)

For more information on this event, see authors@mit presents William Mitchell. To watch a video of this event, see the MIT World page. (streaming video)