Events

Composer Florian Hollerweger: Thursday, May 1

Posted April 23rd, 2014 by Christie Moore

Composer forum series: Florian Hollerweger

revolution_florianThe Revolution is Hear! Sound Art, the Everyday, and Aural Awareness.

Date: Thursday, May 1, 2014
Place: Lewis Music Library, Bldg. 14E-109
Time: 5-6 pm
Reception follows
Free and open to the public

Sponsored by MIT Music and Theater Arts.

MIT Earth Week: The Clean Bin Project Film Screening & Panel Discussion

Posted April 18th, 2014 by Heather McCann

 

CBP Poster

 

Time: Thursday, April 24th, 6-8:30 pm

Location: 3-270

Is it possible to live completely waste free? In this multi-award winning, festival favorite, partners Jen and Grant go head to head in a competition to see who can swear off consumerism and produce the least garbage Their light-hearted competition is set against a darker examination of the problem waste.

Afterwards, join MIT community members for a discussion of living waste free.

Snacks will be provided.

Sponsored by MIT Libraries and the Earth Day Collaborative

Learn more about Mendeley–with pizza!

Posted April 17th, 2014 by Katherine McNeill

Mendeley logo

Meet Mendeley Representatives–Refreshments served!

When: Friday April 25th 3:30-5pm

Where: 14N-132

Come eat pizza and learn more about Mendeley, a tool that helps you manage and share pdfs and easily generate citations and bibliographies when writing.  Representatives from Mendeley,  MIT Mendeley Advisors and library staff will be on hand to meet you, answer your questions and get feedback on this great tool.

RSVP for the event.

Enhanced Mendeley Access for MIT Users

The MIT Libraries has purchased Mendeley Institutional Edition for the MIT community.  This gives MIT users more personal and shared space than what is available with a free Mendeley account.  To find out more see our Mendeley page.

Questions? Email personal-content@mit.edu

Electroacoustics for lunch – Monday, April 28

Posted April 17th, 2014 by Christie Moore

electroacoustic-flyer_medJoin us for a lunchtime performance by MIT’s Florian Hollerweger (Music and Theater Arts) and Forrest Larson (Lewis Music Library) as they explore acoustic and electronic sounds of ethereal and earthbound origins in a new collaboration.

Date: Monday, April 28, 2014
Place: Lewis Music Library, Bldg. 14E-109
Time: noon – 1 pm
Reception follows
Free and open to the public

Discovering the Libraries: IAPril!

Posted April 14th, 2014 by Pritee Tembhekar

By MIT Libraries’ student blogger, Pri Tembhekar

Hello everyone! This week’s post is about the Libraries series of April events called IAPril. Many of these are hands-on events to help you solve particular problems or learn about resources in the Libraries. Essentially, it’s like a tiny piece of that wonderful IAP month compressed into 1-2 hours. If you are like me, you often tell yourself that you’ll download software or check out new offerings at a later time. However, without live training or a spot on my calendar, resources that could make my life easier often fall to the wayside. Needless to say that self-motivation is difficult. Enter the IAPril events. These events are diverse but all focus on a way that the Libraries can make research, citations, data analysis, or life in general easier!  In case you’re already sold, you can see the full listings and register here.

Last Wednesday I attended the event on Mendeley basics.  Mendeley is a free tool that can help you organize and manage your citations and PDFs. As a part of senior year in chemical engineering, I am completing a long and arduous design project. One major point of feedback our team received last week was that our citations were weak. This came as no surprise since each member had been writing feverishly with little attention to collaborating and combining the citations of the team. Streamlined software to share and cite the many PDFs we had in fact used would have been useful.

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A library workshop on Mendeley Basics

Learning about Mendeley during the event was much more effective than if I had done it independently. The event instructor was accessible and answered many audience questions. The session ended up being very interactive because a couple of audience members had extensive experience with the software.  I learned that I could easily save PDFs with a browser add-on. A Word add-on allows me to cite it as I write. Notating and highlighting the PDF can also be done within the Mendeley software. Some quotes from the audience on why they use Mendeley:

“It’s amazing for managing a PDF library.”

“You get a great amount of space.”

Although the software still has some bugs around being compatible with other citation software such as Refworks, it might be worth a shot! The most important take away for me was that I still have a lot to learn about resources in the Libraries. IAPril is a great way to dive in and keeping my eyes open is a must. I look forward to continuing to discover the Libraries with you!

Community Archives in the Digital Era: Creating the South Asian American Digital Archive

Posted April 11th, 2014 by Mark Szarko
Samip Mallick

Samip Mallick

Desis Rising Up and Moving (DRUM)

Please join the MIT Libraries for a discussion with Samip Mallick, co-founder and Executive Director of The South Asian American Digital Archive (SAADA). SAADA works nationally to give voice to South Asian Americans by documenting, preserving, and sharing stories that reflect their diverse experiences.

Mallick will share stories from the archive and SAADA’s unique approach to documenting and preserving community history. The discussion will be moderated by Professor Vivek Bald of MIT Comparative Media Studies/Writing.

SAADAphoto2

Photograph of Vaishno Das Bagai, pictured in a general store. Courtesy of Rani Bagai

 

 

 

Founded in 2008, SAADA has built a digital archive of over 1600 items, and through outreach and educational programming has raised awareness about the rich histories of South Asians in the United States.

Refreshments will be served.

Date: Wednesday, April 30, 2014
Place: 2-105
Time: 4:00-6:00pm
4-4:30: refreshments
4:30-6:00: talk followed by Q&A

The event is free and open to the public. For more information, contact: Michelle Baildon baildon@mit.edu

Additional support is provided by the MIT Asian Pacific American Employee Resource Group, the Center for Bilingual/Bicultural StudiesMIT India, and MIT’s programs in Comparative Media Studies/Writing and History.

New journal on urbanism & an Aga Khan AKPIA symposium, 4/11-12

Posted April 8th, 2014 by Patsy Baudoin

nullThe MIT Libraries, through the Aga Khan Documentation Center, now receives Portal 9, a journal of stories and critical writing about urbanism and the city. Two issues, in both English and Arabic, are published each year, each focused on a unique topic and addressing “the need for a conscientious debate about architecture, planning, culture, and society in urban contexts across the Middle East and the rest of the world.” Portal 9 can be found in Rotch Library’s Limited Access collection, beginning with issue #1 (Autumn 2012).

Readers concerned with issues of urbanism and the city might also be interested in the Aga Khan Program at MIT’s upcoming symposium, “The Orangi Pilot Project & the Legacy of Architect Perween Rehman,” taking place this Friday and Saturday (April 11 & 12) at MIT. The program includes a keynote address by architect Arif Hasan, and papers on topics in the areas of Land & Housing; Planning, Politics & Conflict; Community-based Planning & Professional Choices; Gender, Development & Finance; and Documentation, Knowledge & Evaluation. Sharon Smith, the Libraries’ Aga Khan Documentation Center Program Head, will be speaking at the symposium. More information can be found on the event’s website.

Science poetry reading April 10 in the Lewis Music Library

Posted April 4th, 2014 by Katharine Dunn

2013_poetry-e_DickinsonThe MIT Libraries is hosting a poetry reading in the Lewis Music Library on Thursday, April 10, with author and professor Adam Dickinson.

Dickinson’s latest collection, The Polymers, is an imaginary science project at the intersection of chemistry and poetry. It was a finalist for Canada’s 2013 Governor General’s Award for Poetry and was recently called “the most exciting book of English poetry published anywhere last year.”

Dickinson sees The Polymers as part of “ecopoetics,” or “ecocriticism, …a kind of environmental activism practiced using the resources of poetry and poetics rather than simply traditional academic scholarship.”

Date: Thursday, April 10, 2014
Place: Lewis Music Library, Bldg. 14E-109
Time: 5:00- 6:00 pm
Reception to follow

The event is free and open to the public.

Violin music concert Friday, 4/11/14

Posted April 1st, 2014 by Christie Moore

sjia_achow_cropThe 12th annual Prokopoff violin music concert will be held on Friday, April 11, from 1-2 pm in the Lewis Music Library. Nine talented MIT students will perform music by Rachmaninoff, Chopin, Wieniawski, Bach, Paganini, and Elgar. Come enjoy some wonderful music in an attractive setting!

This event highlights the more than 2,000 violin music scores collected by Stephen Prokopoff and donated to the library in 2001 by Lois Craig, former Associate Dean of MIT’s School of Architecture and Planning.

Date: Friday, April 11, 2014
Place: Lewis Music Library, Bldg. 14E-109
Time: 1 – 2 pm

The concert is free and open to the public.

Spring into IAPril classes and events!

Posted March 27th, 2014 by Stephanie Hartman

Spring is finally here! While you wait for Mother Nature to cooperate, check out the April offerings from the MIT Libraries. Something for everyone!

If you have any questions or feedback, let us know! Connect with us on Twitter or Facebook.

Preservation Week, April 29–May 1: Explore the art and science of preserving cultural heritage

Posted March 27th, 2014 by Heather Denny

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Join us for a variety of events that highlight the importance of preserving cultural heritage materials during National Preservation Week.

Tuesday, April 29th, starting at 12 pm

The Art and Science of Document Security: Past, Present, and Future, 32-144 A series of talks presenting research on historical, contemporary, and novel methods for creating secure documents in all forms. Join us for one session or several. There will be breaks for refreshments and questions throughout.

  • 12:15 pm “Our Marathon”: The Boston Bombing Digital Archive
    Our Marathon is a crowd-sourced digital archive of stories, photos, video, and social media related to the Boston Marathon bombings and aftermath. Join us for a brown bag talk with Jim McGrath and Alicia Peaker from the Our Marathon team for an overview of the project and the archive.
  • 1:00 pm      Opening Remarks
  • 1:15 pm     Our Digital Lives: Protecting Our Data In Use and At Rest, Michael Halsall, Senior Network and Information Security Analyst at MIT

  • 1:45 pm    Benign Neglect No More: How Document Security Affects Access to Memory, Kari R. Smith, Digital Archivist, MIT Libraries Institute Archives and Special Collections
  • 2:45 pm    Historic Letterlocking: The Art and Security of Letterwriting, Jana Dambrogio, Thomas F. Peterson (1957) Conservator, MIT Libraries Curation and Preservation Services
  • 4:00 pm    Thanks for the Memory: 50+ Years of Computing at MIT exhibit, 14N-130 Gallery visit led by Nora Murphy, Archivist for Reference, Outreach, and Instruction, MIT Institute Archives and Special Collections, Maihaugen Gallery  

  • 8:00 pm   The Monuments Men Movie Screening, 26-100 Enjoy a free screening of The Monuments Men. George Clooney portrays a local art conservation hero George Stout who saved cultural heritage from ruin during WWII.

Wednesday, April 30th, 11 am-3 pm

  • Our Marathon “Share Your Story” event, 10-105 Representatives from the Our Marathon online collection of Boston Marathon Bombing experiences will be on campus to document the personal experiences of the MIT community during and after the 2013 Boston Marathon Bombing.

May 1st, 2-3 pm

  • Scrapbook Preservation webinar, 14N-132 Interested in preserving your own items? Join us for a free webinar about scrapbook preservation hosted by the American Library Association. Melissa Tedone, Conservator of the Parks Library Preservation Department at Iowa State University, will talk about older scrapbooks as well as how to identify the most stable materials for new scrapbooks.

All events are free and open to the public. For more information contact preservation-team@mit.edu, or see the Preservation Week website.

Discovering the Libraries: Lewis Music Library

Posted March 26th, 2014 by Pritee Tembhekar

By MIT Libraries’ student blogger, Pri Tembhekar

Hello everyone!

MusicLibSm

Some great study spaces in the Lewis Music Library.

This week’s post is about one of my favorite places to study–the Lewis Music Library. It is especially valuable for classical music aficionados but has resources for all to enjoy. I often visit the music library when I’m craving a quieter place to work but one that is not as oppressive or pungent as, say, the reading room in the student center. The upstairs study nook is good for more casual work. The large tables downstairs provide ample room to spread out your papers and get to business. Upstairs, there are two group study rooms that are ideal for team meetings. The group study rooms can also be used by one person, but they must relocate should a group need the space.

The music library also offers much more beyond a quiet, calm, and naturally lit study space. All that studying can cause considerable stress. From first-hand experience I know that playing music can relieve stress and encourage a happier perspective. If you’ve been meaning to get back to a musical instrument that you once loved, Lewis Library’s scores can help. With over 39,000 musical scores, there’s certainly something you can pick up to ease back into playing music. There are also pieces from 1880-1920 in the Inventions of Note collection that can be accessed online.

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There are pianos on the 1st and 2nd floor as well as Macintosh computers with music software on both floors.

Once you are back into the swing of music, you might consider joining other musicians for an open mic afternoon. Full reign of the piano and a captive audience are up for grabs about once a month in the Lewis Music Library. The next open mic event is Friday April 4th from 12-1 pm in the music library. A full list of music library events, including professional performances, can be found here.

The music library also offers other handy resources to keep in mind. There is a scanner/copier and Macintosh computers on the second floor. These computers have music software that allows for editing and composition. This includes Sibelius7, Finale 2012, Reaper 4, and Logic Pro X. Listening devices for VHS, DVD, and CDs are also available and can be used in the group rooms to facilitate music study. Finally, the library specializes in in-depth research. There are starter guides available, as well as interesting finds such as the oral history collection, and online streaming.

 

Next open mic in the Lewis Music Library: April 4

Posted March 20th, 2014 by Christie Moore
piano

Piano obtained through the Class of 1982 Music Library Fund

It’s happening again: Library music! Open mic in the Lewis Music Library, a chance to try out the new piano. Come jam, perform, or just listen. Everyone welcome. Bring your own music or use the library’s (we’ve got lots!).

Date: Friday, April 4, 2014
Place: Lewis Music Library, Bldg. 14E-109
Time: noon- 1 pm
Refreshments provided

Save the date! One more first Friday open mic event this semester: May 2, 2014

Learn About Socio-economic Data at the ACS Data Users Conference!

Posted March 20th, 2014 by Katherine McNeill

ACS logo

Use data from the American Community Survey (ACS), which measures social and economic trends in the U.S.?  Learn how to optimize your work by attending the inaugural ACS Data Users Conference!

Held May 29-30, 2014 in Washington, D.C., the program includes presentations by ACS data users, top Census Bureau staff, and a lunch presentation by John H. Thompson, director of the U.S. Census Bureau.

Space is limited, register now!

Can’t attend the conference but want to be part of the community?  Join the ACS Data Users Group.

Want to learn more about the ACS or other population data from the Census Bureau?  Check out the Libraries’ guide to Census and Demographic Data.

Check out the complete listing of IAPril 2014 sessions

Posted March 19th, 2014 by Mark Szarko

Pre-registration is required for some, but not all sessions. See below for details.

Class in the Digital Instruction Resource Center

photo by L.Barry Hetherington

Managing your references: Overview of EndNote, Mendeley, and Zotero – Register
Tue April 1, 12:00 – 1:00 pm, 14N-132
Contact: Remlee Green, remlee@mit.edu

Using citation management software to create and maintain a collection of references or PDFs is common and important in today’s academic world. These tools will help you to save citations from your favorite databases and websites, store related PDFs or attachments, and quickly build a bibliography for your papers and publications. We’ll compare and demo 3 tools (EndNote, Mendeley, & Zotero), so you’ll leave the session knowing which tool might work best for your needs.

Please register for this session.

3D Printing for Fun and Science? A Conversation about Digital Fabrication, the Library, and You – Register
Tue April 8, 11:00am – 12:30 pm, 3-442
Contact: Randi Shapiro, shapiror@mit.edu

Digital fabrication has changed considerably over the last few decades. Barriers to use have fallen, and technologies that were once the purview of specialized researchers are now sold in retail outlets like Sears, Staples and the Microsoft store. Schools and libraries have even begun getting into the act, from NC State to the Chicago Public Library.

Applications include producing prosthetic hands for accident victims, manufacturing replacement part for hard-to-source components, or even mapping word frequency across the history of a given journal and printing time series histograms.

But what about here at MIT?

This session will discuss the range of fabrication technologies now available, as well as those available at MIT, for sale, for rent, and (for a limited time, experimentally) through the Libraries. As part of this session, the Libraries have acquired a MakerBot Replicator 2 that is capable of producing objects in PLA plastic.

Plus, participants will have the opportunity to see a 3D-printer in action and even design their own objects – submit a printable file, generated by the free MakerWare software, by Tuesday, April 1st. Up to five submissions will be selected for production before the discussion (provided the designs are producible!).

(Hint: You can try turning a photo into a 3D model with 123D Catch.)

Presenter: Matt Bernhardt, Web Developer, MIT Libraries

Please register for this session.

Mendeley Basics – Register
Wed April 9, 12:00 – 1:00 pm, 14N-132
Contact: Peter Cohn,  pcohn@mit.edu

Mendeley is a free tool that can help you organize and manage your citations and PDFs. Learn how to use Mendeley to discover the latest research, collaborate with others, and automatically generate bibliographies.

Please register for this class.

Business Information for Engineers and Scientists – Register
Tue April 15, 1:00 – 2:00 pm, 14N-132
Contact: Howard Silver, hsilver@mit.edu

This session will introduce engineers and scientists to business information resources that will help you understand the commercial potential for your ideas, how to find partners, and sources for financial support. We will use realistic examples and hands-on exercises with key resources to demonstrate how to match your ideas and discoveries with the opportunities and realities of the marketplace.

Overview of Citation Analysis – Register
Tue April 15, 2:30 – 4:30 pm, 66-144
Time: 2:30-4:30 pm
Contact: Randi Shapiro, shapiror@mit.edu

Whose articles cite a body of work? Is this a high impact journal? How might others assess my scholarly impact? Citation analysis is one of the primary methods used to answer these questions.

Academics, publishers, and funders often study the patterns of citations in the academic literature in order to explore the relationships among researchers, topics, and publications, and to measure the impact of articles, journals, and individuals.

In this two-hour workshop, we will provide an overview of citation analysis, including: sources of data for citation analysis, common impact measures, and freely available software.

Attendees of the class will be eligible for an individual consultation session to explore individual projects and questions.

Presenter(s): Dr. Micah Altman, Director of Research, MIT Libraries; Sean Thomas, Program Manager for Scholarly Repository Services, MIT Libraries

Please register for this class.

Endnote Basics – Register
Wed April 16, 5:00 – 6:00 pm, 14N-132
Contact: Anita Perkins, perkins@mit.edu

EndNote is a “personal bibliographic software” package which allows you to create and manage a database of bibliographic references. Learn how to find and use information more effectively in our hands-on workshop.

Please register for this class.

NIH Public Access Compliance Hands-on Working Session - Register
Thu April 24, 1:00-2:00 pm, 14N-132
Contact: Courtney Crummett, crummett@mit.edu

Missing a PMCID? Can’t figure out why a paper isn’t in compliance? Lost in the NIH manuscript system? Join us for a problem solving session.

This session is designed to provide an opportunity for hands on problem solving in the systems that need to be navigated in the process of submitting and authorizing manuscripts and reporting progress on NIH Funded Grants (eRA Commons; NIHMS, and MyNCBI). Please bring your NIH compliance problems to this session to work through together. Registration encouraged.

Patent searching fundamentals
Thu April 24, 5:00 – 6:00 pm, 14N-132 – Register
Or
Fri April 25, 12:00 – 1:00 pm, 14N-132 – Register
Contact: Anita Perkins, perkins@mit.edu and Anne Graham, grahama@mit.edu

You won’t come out of this session qualified to be a patent attorney, but you will be able to successfully find patent references from all over the world, and know how to find patent text and diagrams. This will be a hands-on session that will help de-mystify the patent literature and show key resources for finding patents through free resources available on the web.

Going beyond Google Scholar: Using the Web of Science and Other Citation Searching Resources to Discover Articles
Mon April 28, 12:00 – 1:00 pm, 14N-132
Contact: Michael M Noga, mnoga@mit.edu

Do you usually look for articles by searching keywords and authors? Try tracking ideas back and forth through time by searching citations to and from articles, reports and other scholarly literature. Citation searching started with the Science Citation Index (Web of Science) and now is part of several other information sources such as Scopus, e-journal collections, and Google Scholar. We will look at several places where you can find scholarly literature through citations and the different results you can get.

Collect and Create Your Own Geographic Data – Register
Mon April 28, 2:00 – 4:00 pm, 14N-132
Contact: Jennie Murack, murack@mit.edu

Can’t find the data you need online? No problem! In this workshop we’ll learn how to collect data in the field using GPS units and phone apps and then use it in GIS software. We’ll also explore georeferencing scanned maps, drawing new data layers (like roads or rivers), and mapping points from a spreadsheet based on coordinates or addresses. Prerequisite: A basic knowledge of GIS and ArcGIS software

New Exhibit: Thanks for the memory: 50+ years of computing at MIT

Posted March 12th, 2014 by Heather Denny
 Jay Forrester with Whirlwind staff and computer

Photograph of Jay Forrester with Whirlwind staff and computer, Barta Building, MIT campus

MIT’s wide-ranging impact on computer science is the focus of an exhibit that has just opened in the Libraries’ Maihaugen Gallery. From Project Whirlwind to Project Athena, MIT’s numerous contributions to the science of computing have affected society in ways no one could have imagined a century ago – though we take most of those developments for granted today.

Since World War II researchers at MIT have pushed computers to work faster, and more efficiently. They’ve explored applications for industry and government, and found ways to incorporate computers into research and teaching. This exhibit highlights some of the projects and research that have contributed to the development of computer theory, applications, software and hardware. The exhibit also celebrates the recent 50th anniversary of Project MAC – a project in which collaborative interdepartmental experimentation and research focused on time-sharing, human-computer interfaces, and interactive modeling.

The Maihaugen Gallery (14N-130) is open to the public Monday through Friday from 10:00 AM to 4:00 PM, except for Institute holidays and special events. The exhibit will run through July 2014.

Composer Keeril Makan – Thursday, April 3

Posted March 10th, 2014 by Christie Moore

Composer forum series: Keeril Makan

keeril_smLetting Time Circle Through Us and other recent music
A preview for the concert of Keeril Makan’s music by Either/Or on April 5 in Killian Hall.

Date: Thursday, April 3, 2014
Place: Lewis Music Library, Bldg. 14E-109
Time: 5-6 pm
Reception follows
Free and open to the public

Sponsored by MIT Music and Theater Arts.

Next open mic in the Lewis Music Library – March 7

Posted February 21st, 2014 by Christie Moore
piano

Piano obtained through the Class of 1982 Music Library Fund

Back by popular demand: Library music! Open mic in the Lewis Music Library, a chance to try out the new piano. Come jam, perform, or just listen. Everyone welcome. Bring your own music or use the library’s (we’ve got lots!).

Date: Friday, March 7, 2014
Place: Lewis Music Library, Bldg. 14E-109
Time: noon- 1 pm
Refreshments provided

Save the dates! Upcoming open mic events: first Fridays, April 4 and May 2, 2014

Open-score intro to the Beethoven quartets – March 6

Posted February 21st, 2014 by Christie Moore

jupiter_quartet_smOpen-Score Introduction to the Beethoven Quartets: The Jupiter Quartet,  hosted by Teresa Neff. Quartet in G Major, Op. 18, No. 2; Quartet in E-flat Major, Op. 74 “Harp”; Quartet in E minor, Op. 59, No. 2. The Jupiter Quartet will present each of the works on their concert program of March 7 and play excerpts, with scores and facsimiles available for use by the audience.

Date: Thursday, March 6, 2014
Place: Lewis Music Library, Bldg. 14E-109
Time: 6:30 pm
Q and A and reception follows
Free and open to the public

Sponsored by MIT Music and Theater Arts.

Discussion: Scientific imaging for artwork & other cultural heritage materials

Posted February 20th, 2014 by Heather Denny

Discussion: Thursday, February 27, 2014, 11:00 am, 14N-132 (DIRC)

CulturalHeritageImage

Detail: Two modes of Reflectance Transformation Imaging. The bottom view shows a Japanese woodcut in “Normal” mode. The top view shows the “Specular Enhancement” mode, which removes color virtually to reveal the subtle surface impressions made in the paper by the artist. © Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco. Konishi Hirosada, artist, Osaka Actor Mimasu Daigoro IV , color woodcut with embossing and metallic pigment, c. 1851-59.

New scientific imaging tools offer the capability to see distinctive details on a 16th century rare book cover, a manuscript, or a work of art, that can’t be seen with the naked eye. Please join the MIT Libraries’ Curation and Preservation Services Department for a fascinating look at how this technology can help us to learn more about our cultural heritage materials, and how to best preserve them.

Carla Schroer, of the non-profit Cultural Heritage Imaging, will discuss the new empirical capture and analysis tools Reflectance Transformation Imaging (RTI), Algorithmic Rendering (AR), and image-based Structure from Motion (SFM) generation of textured 3D geometry. These techniques will be explored in the context of the emerging science of “Computational Photography.” Computational Photography extracts and synthesizes information from image sequences to create a new type of image containing information not found in any single image in the sequence. This technology is in use in many areas from major art museums to remote archaeological sites to fields in the natural sciences.

The event is free and open to the public, no registration required.