Exhibits

IAP 2009: Rotch Library Film Series – Helvetica

Posted January 22nd, 2009 by mit-admin

Rotch Library IAP Film Series:

When: 11:30 AM – 2:00 PM, Friday, January 23, 2009

Where: Rotch Library Conference Room, 7-238

Click the image above to view a trailer for the film.

Helvetica (2007)
A documentary about typography, graphic design and global visual culture, which looks at the proliferation of one typeface as part of a larger conversation about the way type affects our lives. (80 minutes)

This film is a part of the Rotch Library DVD collection.

Contact: Heather McCann, 7-238, x3-7098, <hmccann_at_mit.edu>

Sponsor: MIT Libraries hosted by Heather McCann, Allison Benedetti, Omar Khalidi, Jonah Jenkins

Enrollment: Seating is limited; first come, first served, limited to 20 participants.

IAP 2009: Rotch Library Film Series – Aboriginal Architecture, Living Architecture

Posted January 22nd, 2009 by mit-admin

Rotch Library IAP Film Series continues:

When: 11:30 AM – 2:00 PM, Friday, January 22, 2009

Where: Rotch Library Conference Room, 7-238

Aboriginal architecture, living architecture (2005)

This film offers a fascinating in-depth look into the diversity of North American Native architecture. Featuring expert commentary and stunning imagery, this program provides a virtual tour of seven aboriginal communities– Pueblo, Mohawk, Inuit, Crow, Navajo, Coast Salish, and Haida. (93 minutes)
This film is a part of the Rotch Library DVD collection.

Contact: Heather McCann, 7-238, x3-7098, <hmccann_at_mit.edu>

Sponsor: MIT Libraries hosted by Heather McCann, Allison Benedetti, Omar Khalidi, Jonah Jenkins

Enrollment: Seating is limited; first come, first served, limited to 20 participants.

IAP 2009: Rotch Library Film Series – Choropampa: The Price Of Gold

Posted January 16th, 2009 by mit-admin

Rotch Library IAP Film Series continues:

When: 11:30 AM – 2:00 PM, Friday, January 16, 2009

Where: Rotch Library Conference Room, 7-238

Choropampa: The Price Of Gold (2002)

In June, 2000, 151 kilograms of liquid mercury spilled from a truck hauling it from a goldmine in the Andes. The spill covered a 25-mile long area, contaminating the mountain village of Choropampa. The owners of the mine, the World Bank, and others claim that the problem was quickly resolved, but hundreds of people still suffer the ill effects. This video details the legal battles of the people of Choropampa. (75 mins.)

This film is a part of the Rotch Library DVD collection.

Contact: Heather McCann, 7-238, x3-7098, <hmccann_at_mit.edu>

Sponsor: MIT Libraries hosted by Heather McCann, Allison Benedetti, Omar Khalidi, Jonah Jenkins

Enrollment: Seating is limited; first come, first served, limited to 20 participants.

IAP 2009: Rotch Library Film Series – The Future Of Mud

Posted January 15th, 2009 by mit-admin

Rotch Library IAP Film Series:

When: 11:30 AM – 2:00 PM, Thursday, January 15, 2009

Where: Rotch Library Conference Room, 7-238

The Future Of Mud (2007)

The Future of Mud is a tale of houses and lives in Djenne (2007) – Through the story of a mason in Djenne, this documentary examines an African tradition of mud architecture in Mali.

Canton, China and Calcutta, India (2005) – Explores the effects of international trade on the urban landscape of Canton, China, as it opens up to international trade and advances in Calcutta despite overpopulation and social inequalities

These films are a part of the Rotch Library DVD collection.

Contact: Heather McCann, 7-238, x3-7098, <hmccann_at_mit.edu>

Sponsor: MIT Libraries hosted by Heather McCann, Allison Benedetti, Omar Khalidi, Jonah Jenkins

Enrollment: Seating is limited; first come, first served, limited to 20 participants.

IAP 2009: Rotch Library Film Series – The Greening Of Southie

Posted January 9th, 2009 by mit-admin

Rotch Library IAP Film Series:

When: 11:30 AM – 1:00 PM, Friday, January 9, 2009

Where: Rotch Library Conference Room, 7-238

Click the image above to view a trailer for the film.

The Greening of Southie (2008)

Set in South Boston, The Greening of Southie is a documentary about Boston’s first
residential green building, and the workers asked to build it.(72 mins.)

This film is a part of the Rotch Library DVD collection.

Contact: Heather McCann, 7-238, x3-7098, <hmccann_at_mit.edu>

Sponsor: MIT Libraries hosted by Heather McCann, Allison Benedetti, Omar Khalidi, Jonah Jenkins

Enrollment: Seating is limited; first come, first served, limited to 20 participants.

Archives greets the new year with “Beacon of Progress” exhibit

Posted January 8th, 2009 by Lois Beattie

Beacon of Progress
In 1900 the Paris Salon awarded its highest medal to MIT Professor Désiré Despradelle (Department of Architecture, 1893-1912) for his extravagant design for a proposed monument “dedicated to the glory of the American nation.” The January Object of the Month exhibit by the Institute Archives and Special Collections describes Despradelle’s “Beacon of Progress” and the state of the Institute at the beginning of a new century.

The account of Despradelle’s design is taken from Technology Review, Vol. 2, No. 4, October 1900. A complete run of Technology Review is available in the reading room of the Institute Archives, 14N-118.

IAP 2009: Rotch Library Film Series – King Corn

Posted January 7th, 2009 by mit-admin

Rotch Library IAP Film Series:

When: 11:30 AM – 2:00 PM, Thursday, January 8, 2009

Where: Rotch Library Conference Room, 7-238

Click the image above to view a trailer for the film.

King Corn: a film (2006)
Two college graduates plant and grow a bumper crop of America’s most productive, most subsidized grain on one acre of Iowa soil, with the help of friendly neighbors, genetically modified seeds, nitrogen fertilizers, and powerful herbicides. But when they try to follow their pile of corn into the food system, what they find raises troubling questions about how we eat– and how we farm. (92 minutes)

This film is a part of the Rotch Library DVD collection.

Contact: Heather McCann, 7-238, x3-7098, <hmccann_at_mit.edu>

Sponsor: MIT Libraries hosted by Heather McCann, Allison Benedetti, Omar Khalidi, Jonah Jenkins

Enrollment: Seating is limited; first come, first served, limited to 20 participants.

IAP 2009: Film Series in Rotch Library

Posted January 6th, 2009 by mit-admin

Rotch Library IAP Film Series:

When: Thursday and Fridays during IAP; Thursday, January 8, 2009 – Friday, January 30, 2009

Where: Rotch Library Conference Room, 7-238

Did you know that the Rotch Library of Architecture and Planning maintains an impressive DVD collection, with new titles added regularly?

Join us as we explore the scope of the collection, from from how we eat and farm (King Corn) to African mud architecture (Future of Mud) to the way type affects our lives (Helvetica). We’ll be showing a different film or two each day. Bring your lunch, we’ll provide the entertainment!

More information about each showing will be posted on this blog, and on the Rotch Library website.

Contact: Heather McCann, 7-238, x3-7098, <hmccann_at_mit.edu>

Sponsor: MIT Libraries hosted by Heather McCann, Allison Benedetti, Omar Khalidi, Jonah Jenkins

Enrollment: Seating is limited; first come, first served, limited to 20 participants.

Ellen H. Richards Memorial Home Economics Calendar displayed by Archives in December.

Posted December 1st, 2008 by Lois Beattie

Cover of the calendarEllen Henrietta Swallow Richards (1842-1911) was the first woman to receive a degree from MIT (S.B. in chemistry in 1873). She was instrumental in establishing the Women’s Laboratory, which operated at MIT from 1876 to 1883, for the instruction of women in chemistry. From 1884 to her death, Richards was instructor in sanitary chemistry at MIT.

But beyond MIT, Richards was active in social services, leading efforts to improve the health and education of the general population. The Ellen H. Richards Memorial Home Economics Calendar, the Object of the Month of the Institute Archives and Special Collections, was created in recognition of her leadership role in the area of home economics.

Further information about Ellen Swallow Richards is available on the Archives web site and at the Institute Archives and Special Collections, 14N-118.

New photography exhibit in Rotch Library: Riverscapes

Posted November 25th, 2008 by mit-admin

A new exhibit in Rotch Library:

Riverscapes: and exhibition of photographs of historical water landscapes, by Adriana de Miranda.

An opening reception will take place from 5:30 PM until 7:00 PM on November 25, 2008.

The “hydraulic noria” represents the most elegant of hydraulic devices. It is a water-wheel which, using the power of the river, raises water to irrigate fields which are at a higher level than the level of the water. The system is composed of a vertical wheel and an aqueduct. The base of the wheel is submerged in the river and turns because of the current. Water is carried to the top of the wheel and is poured into the channel on the top of the aqueduct, and is directed to irrigate the surrounding fields. Hydraulic norias provide environmental and economic advantages, as well as those of safety. As a clean technology they allow irrigation requiring no petrol or oil, but fully exploiting the power of the river, as an economical device they are built using materials found in the area and have a simple assembly; they are also efficient and have low operational and maintenance costs.

The hydraulic noria, whose earliest evidence dates back to at least the Ist century B.C., is widespread in Syria on the Orontes river, but it still exists today in other parts of the Mediterranean basin, in East Asia and Central America where its technology has not changed. Particularly the Syrian and Chinese devices successfully combine the functional with the aesthetic and display sophisticated forms of construction.

They are visually impressive, present shapes which are the results of an accurate and detailed design and are of great historical, environmental and iconographical importance. These installations were devised as architectural constructions whose design is not only intended to be functional, but also aesthetic. They also show an architecture which has been able to combine essentiality and simplicity, necessary for integration into the landscape, and an architectural shape whose geometric construction is based on schemes of symmetry, modularity and harmony.

This exhibit will be on display from November 25, 2008 until December 16, 2008.

Paintings exhibit in Rotch Library: Disintegration by R. Marrone

Posted November 13th, 2008 by mit-admin

Rotch Library will host an exhibition of paintings by Roberto Marrone from November 14 until November 25, 2008. There will be an opening reception starting at 5:30PM, ending at 7 PM on November 14.

Disintegration (Paintings)

The exhibition displays some of Roberto Marrone’s works. Many of them are the results of the reaction between colour and chemical material. Looking at the painting, the observer reads subjective figures which are the results of how the materials used interfere with each other.


These works are realized in two phases: Firstly the material is distributed on the canvas; layers of colour, oxide, acid and other reactive substances, are superimposed one upon another. Secondly there is the phase of the “reaction”, which involves a “disintegration” of the material with the consequent formation of bright-coloured forms. These abstract forms can be perceived subjectively by the observer.
In addition to these paintings, the exhibition also displays several abstract-figurative drawings by the artist.

Roberto Marrone is an Italian painter who lives and works in Milan.

Archives exhibit centers on a 1970s “energy initiative”

Posted November 3rd, 2008 by Lois Beattie

Chart from Project on the Predicament of Mankind, 1972

Today’s MIT Energy Initiative, established by President Susan Hockfield in September 2006, began a new stage of highly focused research and policy analysis at MIT. Over the years MIT faculty members have been active in movements committed to long-range planning for energy needs and environmental management. This month the Object of the Month exhibit by the Institute Archives and Special Collections features one of these efforts: the Project on the Predicament of Mankind, which was carried out by an international team at MIT in the 1970s, sponsored by the Club of Rome. Shown here is a chart from a 1972 report from the project.

From MIT’s earliest days, research has been conducted on various forms of energy. The work is richly documented throughout the holdings of the Institute Archives and Special Collections in the records of the Institute and the papers of its faculty and students. The collections are available for use in the Archives, 14N-118.

Arthur D. Little, Inc. Archives Come to MIT

Posted October 14th, 2008 by Heather Denny

Arthur Dehon Little (1863-1935) attended MIT as an undergraduate student in chemistry from 1881 to 1884 and was a co-founder and editor of the student newspaper, The Tech. The firm he founded in 1909, Arthur D. Little, Inc., grew into one of the world’s foremost independent consulting and research organizations with an unmatched reputation for excellence in devising novel solutions to challenging problems and leading the way in management systems development. Over its lifetime, the company worked with MIT on numerous research projects and employed a number of MIT graduates and researchers. Arthur D. Little, Inc.’s longstanding relationship with MIT made the Institute Archives a fitting home for ADL, Inc.’s archives.

The Arthur D. Little, Inc. Collection was purchased at auction by the ADL, Inc. Alumni Association and given to MIT in 2002. It was recently made available to the public in the MIT Institute Archives & Special Collections. Selected items from the ADL Collection, as well as several items on loan from ADL alumni, will be on display through October 31 in the MIT Libraries’ Maihaugen Gallery. An online exhibit Scatter Acorns That Oaks May Grow” is also available. The exhibit takes its name from the ADL, Inc. motto, Glandes Sparge Ut Quercus Crescant.

Exhibit at Rotch Library: “Return To Ooze”

Posted October 8th, 2008 by mit-admin

Return to Ooze, a show of new artworks by AJ Liberto, opened Friday, October 3, 2008, at the Rotch Library of Art & Architecture at Massachusetts Institute of Technology. AJ Liberto received his Master’s degree in sculpture from Virginia Commonwealth University in 2007 and currently lives and works in Somerville, MA.

The exhibition `Return to Ooze’ will showcase new works revolving around mythical, mystical, and scientific transformations involving liquids. From alchemists to wildcatters to the Cylons of Battlestar Gallactica, ooze plays an integral role in birth, the search for means and meaning and ultimately, death. Return to Ooze acknowledge this idea not only in the liquid-turned-solid materials (plaster, polymers, epoxy) of their makeup, but also in the surfaces, the represented objects, and mythology. In some instances the work will be installed traditionally, in others more surprising spaces will be utilized, such as on support beams, display cabinets, and assorted nooks and walls. The orbits of Return to Ooze circle the unintentional beauty of the architecture of industry and the raw products and by-products of manufacturing. These noisy and occasionally messy aspects of commerce are often expressed in my work alongside careful juxtapositions; fragile vases, tailored menswear or napping animals.

Archives exhibits report “On the Making of Silk Purses from Sows’ Ears,” 1921

Posted October 1st, 2008 by Lois Beattie

The For its October Object of the Month, the Institute Archives & Special Collections exhibits a small report issued by Arthur D. Little, Inc. in 1921, “On the Making of Silk Purses from Sows’ Ears.” The report describes the process used by the company’s chemists to make two “silk” purses from pork byproducts to disprove the old adage that “you can’t make a silk purse of a sow’s ear.” The report is part of the Arthur D. Little, Inc. Archives Collection (MC 579), which was given to MIT by the Arthur D. Little, Inc. Alumni Association in 2002. The collection is available for research in the Institute Archives, 14N-118.

During the month of October one of the two silk purses is on display in the Maihaugen Gallery (next to the Institute Archives) along with other objects from the collection or on loan from MIT and ADL alumni.

Archives’ September exhibit: Katharine Dexter (McCormick), Class of 1904: “My Preparation for the M.I.T.”

Posted September 2nd, 2008 by Lois Beattie

Katharine Dexter in labKatharine Dexter (McCormick), a pioneer of the women’s suffrage and birth control movements, was also one of MIT’s most important benefactors. A dedicated alumna, one of her most significant gifts was a residence for women, McCormick Hall, which opened in 1963.

For an English composition class at MIT, she wrote of her determination to be fully prepared for entering MIT – preparation that included a degree from another institution and study in France and Germany. Her composition is included in the Object of the Month exhibit by the Institute Archives and Special Collections.

The papers of Katharine Dexter McCormick, which include student papers, class notebooks, and family correspondence, are available for research in the Institute Archives and Special Collections, 14N-118, Monday – Thursday, 10 am – 4 pm.

Photograph courtesy of the MIT Museum

The physics of baseball is the subject of Archives’ August exhibit

Posted August 1st, 2008 by Lois Beattie

Multiflash picture of girl hitting baseball

In July 1965 MIT Professor of Electrical Measurements Harold “Doc” Edgerton produced a batch of multiflash baseball photos and sent them to long-time colleague Vannevar Bush for comment. The Archives’ August Object of the Month exhibit includes Bush’s response, in which he records his thoughts about the physics of baseball, and a page from Edgerton’s notebook showing two of the baseball pictures (Bush’s letter and Edgerton’s notebook from the Harold E. Edgerton Papers – MC 25).

The papers of Bush (MC 78) as well as those of Edgerton are available for use in the Institute Archives and Special Collections, 14N-118.

Photograph © Harold E. Edgerton 1992 Trust

Archives July exhibit: What I Did on My Summer Vacation: Diary of Robert H. Richards, 1873

Posted July 1st, 2008 by Lois Beattie

Page from diaryThe Institute Archives and Special Collections is exhibiting for its Object of the Month excerpts from a diary kept by MIT Professor of Mining Engineering Robert Richards in the summer of 1873. Professor Richards, Professor John Ordway, and a group of nine undergraduates spent their vacation visiting mining camps in northern New England and the Adirondacks–an excursion that was a requirement for mining students at MIT at that time. Professor Richards’s diary includes notes about courses he was teaching, student assignments at mine sites, and sketches of machinery.

Two years after this 1873 diary, Robert Richards married Ellen Swallow, the first female graduate of MIT (S.B. 1873), and the diary includes a few entries about this personal side of his life. Among the papers of Robert Hallowell Richards (MC 116) are other diaries, course materials, and photographs, which are available for research in the Archives, 14N-118, Monday – Thursday, 10 am – 4 pm.

Archives exhibit: 1916 alumni/ae event, “The Telephone Banquet”

Posted June 3rd, 2008 by Lois Beattie

Cover of Telephone Banquet program

On June 14, 1916, approximately 1,500 alumni/ae along with special guests, including Alexander Graham Bell and Orville Wright, gathered at Symphony Hall in Boston to celebrate the new MIT campus in Cambridge and to raise funds. The speeches presented that night were broadcast via telephone to 34 alumni gatherings all over the country. The June Object of the Month exhibit on the web site of the Institute Archives and Special Collections includes photographs, the banquet program and menu, and links to other events surrounding MIT’s move from Boston to Cambridge. Visit the Archives in 14N-118 to learn more about this momentous milestone in the history of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Drawing on cover of program by Isaac B. Hazelton, MIT class of 1894.

Rotch Library Exhibit: Paintings by Carol Schweigert

Posted May 5th, 2008 by mit-admin

Exhibit in Rotch Library – Urban Studies/Random Views

Urban Studies/Random Views, on view from May 5th to July 18th, is a collection of recent oil paintings by Carol Schweigert of Dewey Library.

The paintings were initially inspired by the dynamic views of the ongoing construction surrounding the Library. The focus expanded to include other views in Cambridge and Charlestown, reflecting the coexistence of the natural and the architectural.

These are traditional plein air paintings with an underlying graphic composition of more modern sensibilities.

A reception is planned for 4:00PM – 6:30PM, Friday, May 9, 2008 in Rotch Library, 7-238.