Exhibits

Telegraphy exhibit opens in the Maihaugen Gallery

Posted September 8th, 2014 by mit-admin

linemenWired: A World Transformed by the Telegraph, an exhibition highlighting the Libraries’ special collections in telegraphy, recently opened in the Maihaugen Gallery (14N-130).

Until the mid-19th century, most messages could travel across long distances only as quickly as they could be physically carried. Audiovisual systems such as smoke, flags, drums, beacons, and gunshots were cumbersome and severely limited in their sophistication and speed.

The electric telegraph changed all that. The ability to communicate instantaneously across entire continents – and even oceans – heralded the birth of telecommunications.

The current exhibition introduces a rich and varied collection of materials on the electric telegraph and its impact on the world. The collection is a gift of Thomas F. Peterson, Jr. (MIT 1957), who also made a generous donation to process and catalog its contents.

The exhibit includes telegrams, images, books, video, and ephemera that chart the birth of a huge industry, and reveal how business, warfare, social interactions, and even the arts were affected by this transformational technology.

Visit the Maihaugen Gallery Monday–Friday, 10 a.m.–4 p.m.

What’s new at the Libraries this fall

Posted August 26th, 2014 by mit-admin

nullWelcome back! The MIT Libraries have been busy over your summer vacation. We’ve made improvements, added new resources, expanded our services, and lined up great events for the fall. Here are some of the new things you can look forward to:

New website

  • Our homepage has a new look Everyone wants to look their best going back-to-school, including us! With your feedback we made major improvements to our homepage. The fresh new design features a streamlined search bar, less clutter, and easy to find hours, locations, research guides, and experts.

New resources & tools

  • Got data? Need help managing it? We can help MIT faculty and researchers manage, store, and share the data you produce. Evaluate your needs with this short checklist on our new Data Management website.

Expanded borrowing & easier renewing

  • More options for borrowing Borrow Direct, the partnership that allows you to borrow books from other Ivy League+ institutions, has expanded to include Johns Hopkins University. Search over 50 million volumes owned by Borrow Direct libraries through MIT’s WorldCat.
  • Keep your books longer You may have noticed this summer that you didn’t have to worry about renewing books as often. We launched automatic renewals this spring, giving you extra time with your books. Your library loans will now automatically renew 3 days before the due date, unless the book has been requested by another patron.

Upcoming events & exhibits

  • Fall exhibit opens Wired: A World Transformed by the Telegraph opens in the Maihaugen Gallery in September. Long before telephone or text, instantaneous messages travelled by telegraph. Explore the historic significance of this technological triumph of the 19th century through an exhibit featuring books, telegrams, photographs, manuscripts, and ephemera from the Libraries’ collections.
  • Fridays just got a little more fun, and furry Starting in October we’re expanding our popular therapy dog program. Now on the first Friday of each month this fall you can stop by Hayden Library for some one-on-one time with a dog. Petting a dog is great stress relief! Just drop by 2-4pm on October 3, November 7, or December 5.
  • Authors@MIT series returns The MIT Libraries and MIT Press Bookstore will offer a series of events with MIT authors. Join us in October for a reading by Ellen Harris who will discuss her most recent work, George Frideric Handel: A Life with Friends on Wednesday, October 22nd, at 5:30pm in the Lewis Music Library. Stay tuned for more events to come.

Follow the MIT Libraries on Twitter and Facebook for all the latest news and events.

Discovering the Libraries: Galleries, audio books, and 24-hour study

Posted May 15th, 2014 by Pritee Tembhekar

By MIT Libraries’ student blogger, Pri Tembhekar

Hello everyone!

This week’s post is about fun and eclectic features of the Libraries. These are useful for some intellectual relaxation or a quick break from studying in the library. As the Libraries’ blogger, I wanted to explore some aspects of the Libraries that are less well-known. This week, I dove into the galleries and audiobook collection. This post will be followed by one on preservation, the archives, and rare books.

MaihaugenGallery2Web

Maihaugen Gallery

With graduation just around the corner, many of us have friends and family visiting. These curious visitors often want to know more about the history and importance of MIT (especially when their darling child is getting a degree). The MIT Museum is a great resource, as are the Library exhibits. The largest library exhibit space is the Maihaugen Gallery. You have likely passed by this gallery on your way to Hayden Library or Walker Memorial. It is located in 14N-130. Established in 2008, the Maihuagen Gallery provides an up-close look at MIT’s rare books, artwork, maps, historical documents and photographs. Currently, the gallery is showcasing the evolution of computing at MIT. Friends and family members of all ages will likely enjoy seeing relics from a by-gone computing age and their connection to MIT.

To celebrate the end of the year, I’m taking a few road trips. Top 40 on the radio can get old fast, so this time I’m planning to bring along some audio books. The Libraries have a collection of audio books for all different tastes. For example, I’m interested in the impact of social media on human interactions so Professor Sherry Turkle’s book Alone Together stood out to me. One cautionary note is that the audiobooks are primarily in CD format. Thus if you have a fancy new car that only reads mp3s, this might not be the right option.

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Dewey Library 24×7 study space

Finally, I wanted to include a note about the 24-hour study spaces the Libraries provide. You’ll probably be studying this part of the semester and it can sometimes be hard to find a quiet space. During non-library hours these areas are accessible with your MIT ID. They do not provide access to library books, however there are plenty of tables, computers, and printers. Good luck with finals!

Adventurer in Light and Color: Stained glass exhibit

Posted May 6th, 2014 by Jana Dambrogio

Stop by the Jackson Homestead in Historic Newton before the end of July to catch the “Charles J. Connick: Adventurer in Light and Color” exhibition. It features drawings, photos, studies, and stained glass works by Charles J. Connick a prominent stained glass artist from Newton, Massachusetts. Included in the exhibit are several reproductions of drawings held by MIT Libraries as well as a stained glass window (Sir Bors Succours the Maid) from the Libraries’ collections. For more information about the Charles J. Connick Stained Glass Foundation Collection held at MIT, visit our Special Collections page or watch the video at TechTV.

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Design inspired by E. Dickinson poem “There is no Frigate Like a Book.”

The exhibition features the cartoon, or full-size study for a work in another medium, shown here.  This design was executed in pencil and gouache and later realized in stained glass in 1939 for the Newtonville Public Library, which is now the Newton Senior Center. The work was inspired by the Emily Dickinson poem, “There is no Frigate Like a Book.” For more information about this image, please visit the Charles J. Connick image collection in Dome.

For more about the work of Charles J. Connick and his studio, visit the Charles J. Connick Stained Glass Foundation website and the Boston Public Library’s Charles J. Connick Gouaches: Massachusetts Flickr collection.

The following details were captured when the cartoon was in the Wunsch Conservation Lab for examination.

This post was researched written with Lorrie McAllister, Digital and Special Collections Strategist.

photo 3

Connick’s initials “CJC” and date 1939.

This detail reveals underdrawing in pencil.

This detail reveals underdrawing in pencil.

 

White drips of paint may suggest that Connick worked some areas upright.

White drips of paint may suggest that Connick worked some areas upright.

 

This detail shows the painterly quality of the work.

This detail shows the painterly quality of the work.

 

Spring into IAPril classes and events!

Posted March 27th, 2014 by Stephanie Hartman

Spring is finally here! While you wait for Mother Nature to cooperate, check out the April offerings from the MIT Libraries. Something for everyone!

If you have any questions or feedback, let us know! Connect with us on Twitter or Facebook.

Preservation Week, April 29–May 1: Explore the art and science of preserving cultural heritage

Posted March 27th, 2014 by Heather Denny

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Join us for a variety of events that highlight the importance of preserving cultural heritage materials during National Preservation Week.

Tuesday, April 29th, starting at 12 pm

The Art and Science of Document Security: Past, Present, and Future, 32-144 A series of talks presenting research on historical, contemporary, and novel methods for creating secure documents in all forms. Join us for one session or several. There will be breaks for refreshments and questions throughout.

  • 12:15 pm “Our Marathon”: The Boston Bombing Digital Archive
    Our Marathon is a crowd-sourced digital archive of stories, photos, video, and social media related to the Boston Marathon bombings and aftermath. Join us for a brown bag talk with Jim McGrath and Alicia Peaker from the Our Marathon team for an overview of the project and the archive.
  • 1:00 pm      Opening Remarks
  • 1:15 pm     Our Digital Lives: Protecting Our Data In Use and At Rest, Michael Halsall, Senior Network and Information Security Analyst at MIT

  • 1:45 pm    Benign Neglect No More: How Document Security Affects Access to Memory, Kari R. Smith, Digital Archivist, MIT Libraries Institute Archives and Special Collections
  • 2:45 pm    Historic Letterlocking: The Art and Security of Letterwriting, Jana Dambrogio, Thomas F. Peterson (1957) Conservator, MIT Libraries Curation and Preservation Services
  • 4:00 pm    Thanks for the Memory: 50+ Years of Computing at MIT exhibit, 14N-130 Gallery visit led by Nora Murphy, Archivist for Reference, Outreach, and Instruction, MIT Institute Archives and Special Collections, Maihaugen Gallery  

  • 8:00 pm   The Monuments Men Movie Screening, 26-100 Enjoy a free screening of The Monuments Men. George Clooney portrays a local art conservation hero George Stout who saved cultural heritage from ruin during WWII.

Wednesday, April 30th, 11 am-3 pm

  • Our Marathon “Share Your Story” event, 10-105 Representatives from the Our Marathon online collection of Boston Marathon Bombing experiences will be on campus to document the personal experiences of the MIT community during and after the 2013 Boston Marathon Bombing.

May 1st, 2-3 pm

  • Scrapbook Preservation webinar, 14N-132 Interested in preserving your own items? Join us for a free webinar about scrapbook preservation hosted by the American Library Association. Melissa Tedone, Conservator of the Parks Library Preservation Department at Iowa State University, will talk about older scrapbooks as well as how to identify the most stable materials for new scrapbooks.

All events are free and open to the public. For more information contact preservation-team@mit.edu, or see the Preservation Week website.

New Exhibit: Thanks for the memory: 50+ years of computing at MIT

Posted March 12th, 2014 by Heather Denny
 Jay Forrester with Whirlwind staff and computer

Photograph of Jay Forrester with Whirlwind staff and computer, Barta Building, MIT campus

MIT’s wide-ranging impact on computer science is the focus of an exhibit that has just opened in the Libraries’ Maihaugen Gallery. From Project Whirlwind to Project Athena, MIT’s numerous contributions to the science of computing have affected society in ways no one could have imagined a century ago – though we take most of those developments for granted today.

Since World War II researchers at MIT have pushed computers to work faster, and more efficiently. They’ve explored applications for industry and government, and found ways to incorporate computers into research and teaching. This exhibit highlights some of the projects and research that have contributed to the development of computer theory, applications, software and hardware. The exhibit also celebrates the recent 50th anniversary of Project MAC – a project in which collaborative interdepartmental experimentation and research focused on time-sharing, human-computer interfaces, and interactive modeling.

The Maihaugen Gallery (14N-130) is open to the public Monday through Friday from 10:00 AM to 4:00 PM, except for Institute holidays and special events. The exhibit will run through July 2014.

Thanks, MIT music, for your dulcet tones.

Posted January 17th, 2014 by Jana Dambrogio

This week was an all-things-MIT-Music for the conservation lab. We de-installed the “Noteworthy Connections” exhibition in the Maihaugen Gallery  featuring the music treasures from the Lewis Music Library and the Institute Archives and Special Collections.

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MIT’s Chorallaries, an a cappella music group, provides cheerful music to listen to while we make protective enclosures for some of the illuminated music manuscripts folios that will be used for teaching next semester. We are curious to discover more “whistle-while-you-work” music created by MIT faculty, staff, and students.

Halloween treat: Monster Book of Monsters’ transformation

Posted October 31st, 2013 by Heather Denny

There have been spooky happenings in the Maihaugen Gallery this Halloween. A medieval chant book, originally from the fifteenth or sixteenth century, has inexplicably transformed into a Harry Potter-inspired Monster Book of Monsters! Come see the enormous leather-and-wood-bound book complete with scary demon face, vicious teeth, and dismembered body parts. Rumor has it that the book will disappear soon after midnight on Halloween, so see it today!

While you’re in the gallery, check out the exhibit Noteworthy ConnectionsMusic in the MIT Libraries on display until December 12, 2013.

MonsterBookofMonsters

Please note: No library users were harmed in the creation of the Monster Book, and all fun was had under the care and supervision of the Libraries’ expert Preservation team.

Final weeks to see “Noteworthy Connections” exhibit

Posted October 29th, 2013 by Heather Denny

Noteworthy ConnectionsMusic in the MIT Libraries will be on display until December 31, 2013 in the Libraries’ Maihaugen Gallery.

MusicExhibitGallery

Maihaugen Gallery

The exhibit delves into the holdings of the Lewis Music Library and the Institute Archives and Special Collections, to reveal MIT’s diverse musical interests, the accomplishments of its talented students and faculty, and the rich history the Institute’s musical groups and clubs.

Some of the unique items on display include original manuscripts and rare books, autographed letters and scores, a handmade oscillator, and an original leaf from the Glaser Codex of medieval chants.

Visit the gallery:
Monday-Thursday
10 a.m. – 4 p.m.

Building 14N-130

Musical Treasures: Gallery talk Wednesday, May 1 at noon

Posted April 26th, 2013 by Christie Moore

chant_leaf Music Librarian Peter Munstedt will give a gallery talk, “Musical Treasures in the MIT Libraries” on Wednesday, May 1 from noon-12:45 pm. The Maihaugen exhibit Noteworthy Connections: Music in the MIT Libraries will be on view until July 2013.

Wednesday, May 1, 2013
Noon-12:45 pm
Maihaugen Gallery, Bldg. 14N-130
Free and open to the public.

Herb Pomeroy – MIT Jazz@50 Exhibition, April 25

Posted April 23rd, 2013 by Christie Moore

pomeroyInterested in jazz at MIT? Photographs, recordings, scores, video clips, and other materials from the Lewis Music Library and the Institute Archives and Special Collections will be featured in a special one-day exhibit on Thursday afternoon, 4/25/2013. There will be many items from the Herb Pomeroy Collection in celebration of the 50th anniversary of jazz becoming a part of the MIT curriculum under the leadership of Herb Pomeroy.

Date: Thursday, April 25, 3:00pm-5:00pm
Place: Lewis Music Library, Bldg. 14E-109
Free and open to the public.

Nomadic sculpture finds a home in Hayden – for a week!

Posted March 8th, 2013 by Stephanie Hartman

Amalia Pica - sculptureIn collaboration with the List Visual Arts Center, the MIT Libraries are excited to host Amalia Pica’s nomadic sculpture from March 8, 2013 to the morning of March 15, 2013. The piece is on display on the 1st floor of the Hayden Library (14S-100) in the New Books area.  This coincides with Pica’s current exhibition at the List. Stop by and take a look!

About the piece:

I am Mit, as I am in Mit, just like a lot of other people are, 2011–2012
Granite, wood box on wheels, and lending cards
Courtesy of the artist and Chisenhale Gallery, London

This sculpture was lent to residents of the London borough of Tower Hamlets for an entire calendar year. The project was first conceived for Chisenhale Gallery, located in the borough, where people signed up to participate in its ongoing circulation. The piece is now being lent to members of the MIT campus community for the remaining duration of the exhibition. Each person cares for the sculpture for one week, passing it on to the next host. Participants fill out a lending card, which serves as a record of the nomadic sculpture’s travels. The piece changes titles according to the location in which it travels and includes the name of the area with a misspelling. The sculpture is a hand carving of an echeveria, a sturdy succulent named, in a misspelling, after the Mexican botanical artist Atanasio Echeverría y Godoy.

Read the original Artist’s Statement.

Information courtesy of the List Visual Arts Center

Noteworthy Connections opens in the Maihaugen Gallery

Posted February 21st, 2013 by Heather Denny

David M. Epstein conductor of the MIT Symphony Orchestra, 1965-1998, Photo: MIT Museum

A new exhibition exploring the extraordinary connection between the MIT mind and music has opened in the Libraries’ Maihaugen Gallery.

Noteworthy Connections: Music in the MIT Libraries delves into the holdings of the Lewis Music Library and the Institute Archives and Special Collections, to reveal MIT’s diverse musical interests, the accomplishments of its talented students and faculty, and the rich history the Institute’s musical groups and clubs.

The exhibit will be on view in the gallery until December, 2013. Visit the gallery:

Monday-Thursday
10 a.m. – 4 p.m.
Building 14N-130

Rotch Art Exhibit: Synergy

Posted October 17th, 2012 by Patsy Baudoin

Synergy: An Experiment in Communicating Science through Art
Opening October 1, 2012 in Rotch Library

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Eight Boston and Cape Cod professional artists have been paired with MIT/Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution scientists to render complex scientific concepts accessible to the viewer.  Both artists and scientists must dynamically translate across disciplines, yielding a heightened clarity for the broader impact of scientific research.  The outcome of these collaborations will be an exhibition at the Museum of Science, Boston, 2013 that invites the general public to explore oceanography through compelling art. In anticipation for this show, preliminary works by the artists and original artwork by the scientists are on display at the Rotch Gallery on MIT campus. Visit Rotch to get a sneak peek into the body of work arising from Synergy.

This program is made possible in part by the Grants Program of the Council for the Arts at MIT and the Graduate Student Life Grants.

Learn more about the exhibit.

“Magnetic Resonance” on display in the Maihaugen Gallery

Posted October 2nd, 2012 by Heather Denny

The fall exhibit in the Maihaugen Gallery showcases a unique collection on view to the public for the very first time. Magnetic Resonance: Four Centuries of Science from the Vail Collection offers a look inside MIT’s Vail Collection—one of the world’s most important collections of books on magnetism, electricity, animal magnetism, and lighter-than-air travel.

The collection includes foundational texts in the history of science and technology, rare titles from the late 15th-19th centuries, works of popular science, and thousands of rare pamphlets and articles. It was given to MIT in 1912, by Theodore N. Vail, president of AT&T and a member of the MIT Corporation. The exhibit marks the 100th anniversary of the Vail Collection’s arrival at the Institute and celebrates the generosity of Thomas F. Peterson, Jr. (MIT 1957), who supported a three-year project to unlock the potential of this stunning collection. Every title has been fully cataloged, essential conservation work has been performed, and the Vail Collection can now be shared with the world. Visit the gallery, attend an event, or explore the collection online.

Vail Exhibit EventsEXHIBIT EVENTS:

Behind the Scenes: Conserving and Exhibiting the Vail Collection

Wednesday, October 17, 1pm–2pm, Maihaugen Gallery (14N-130) MIT’s book conservator, Nancy Schrock, discusses conservation treatment and  display of the Collection. The talk begins in the gallery and proceeds to the Wunsch Conservation Lab.

 

Witches, Magic, and Monsters: The Spooky Side of MIT’s Vail Collection

Friday, October 26, 3pm, Institute Archives (14N-118) A Halloween-inspired look at the creepier side of the Collection. Online registration required.

 

The Scientific Conversation and the Vail Collection: Gallery Talks & Tours

Thursday, November 8, 11am–noon, Maihaugen Gallery (14N-130)

Wednesday, November 28, 3pm–4pm, Maihaugen Gallery (14N-130) Exhibit curator and rare books program manager, Stephen Skuce, leads a tour and talk about the exhibit.

 

MIT’s Vail Collection: From the Lodestone to the X-Ray

Friday, November 16, 10:30am, Institute Archives (14N-118) A presentation by rare books program manager, Stephen Skuce.

MIT Institute Archives in the Cambridge Open Archives Tour on July 12

Posted July 2nd, 2012 by Heather Denny

Fourth Annual Open Archives Tour: Famous and Infamous

The Cambridge Historical Society is hosting its fourth annual Open Archives Tour, July 9-12, 2012. MIT is participating along with eleven other organizations throughout Cambridge.

With the theme Famous and Infamous, each archive will delve into their collections to display unique materials, including photographs, correspondence, ephemera, and more, offering a rare look inside some of Cambridge’s most fascinating archives. There will be twelve archives featured over four days (three per day).

Tours and Dates:

July 9, 5:00-8:00 pm

City Collections, featuring 

  • Cambridge Historical Commission
  • Cambridge Room of the Public Library
  • Cambridge Public Works Department

July 10, 3:00-6:00 pm

Harvard Collections, featuring 

  • Harvard University Archives
  • Houghton Library at Harvard
  • Schlesinger Library at Harvard

July 11, 5:00-8:00 pm

Cultural Collections, featuring 

  • Mount Auburn Cemetery
  • Cambridge Historical Society
  • The Longfellow House – Washington’s Headquarters National Historic Site

July 12, 3:00-6:00 pm

MIT Collections, featuring 

For more information and reservations, contact: 617-547-4252 or www.cambridgearchives.org

 

Watch video for Rotch Library exhibit on artist books

Posted May 29th, 2012 by Melissa Feiden

MIT Tech TV
Check out our new video for the exhibit Bookish: Artist Books from the Collection of Rotch Library of Architecture and Planning, 1960-Present. Guest curator Samuel Ray Jacobson, MIT SMArchS ’13, History Theory and Criticism of Architecture and Art, discusses the artist books on display in Rotch Library.  The exhibit runs through June 10, 2012.

Created in conjunction with the symposium Unbound: Speculations on the Future of the Book which took place on May 4, Rotch’s Bookish exhibit explores the means and methods through which artist books challenge the book as traditionally conceived. By their selective, intentional performance and denial of normative aspects of book design, these artist-conceived objects negate such norms while sustaining their worth and continued relevance.

Gallery talk on stained glass restoration and conservation Friday, May 11

Posted April 30th, 2012 by Heather Denny

Glass at MIT exhibition, Maihaugen Gallery, photo by: L. Barry Hetherington


Gallery Talk with Roberto Rosa

Roberto Rosa, Serpentino Stained Glass

When: Friday, May 11, 2pm

Where: Institute Archives (14N-118)

In conjunction with the Glass at MIT: Beauty and Utility exhibition, Roberto Rosa from Serpentino Stained Glass will discuss stained glass art and artists, and his work in the restoration and conservation of historic stained glass.

Rosa has restored windows in some of America’s most prominent buildings including the Massachusetts State House and Trinity Church in Boston. Most recently, he was the chief conservator for thirteen opalescent glass windows at Salve Regina University in Newport RI, designed by John La Farge.

After Rosa’s talk there will be time for questions and viewing the exhibit in the Maihaugen Gallery. This event is free and open to the public.

New website provides access to treasures in the Charles J. Connick Stained Glass Foundation Collection

Posted February 13th, 2012 by Melissa Feiden

In conjunction with the Maihaugen Gallery exhibit opening of Glass at MIT: Beauty and Utility, the MIT Libraries have launched a new Charles J. Connick Stained Glass Foundation Collection website.

The website includes a slideshow and sampling of images from collection artwork, including stained glass panels and paper designs.  A history page provides insight into Connick as an artist, his studio, and how the collection came to MIT.  Additionally, it covers the contents of the collection and processing projects such as digitization and conservation.

Soon, researchers will be able to use the website to access digital images in the collection and to search a database of collection job files containing information on Connick windows around the country.

For more information on the Charles J. Connick Stained Glass Foundation Collection, visit the new website or contact Jeremy Grubman, Project Manager, at jgrubman@mit.edu.