Classes

NIH Public Access Compliance Hands-on Working Session

Posted October 10th, 2014 by Mark Szarko

Test TubeMissing a PMCID? Can’t figure out why a paper isn’t in compliance? Lost in NIH manuscript system? Join us for a problem solving session.

When: Tue October 14, 12:00 – 1:00 pm,
Where: 14N-132

This session is designed to provide an opportunity for hands on problem solving in the systems that need to be navigated in the process of submitting and authorizing manuscripts and reporting progress on NIH Funded Grants (eRA Commons; NIHMS, and MyNCBI). Please bring your NIH compliance problems and logins to this session to work through together. Registration encouraged.

For more information, please contact Courtney Crummett (crummett@mit.edu).

Fall IAP classes are here!

Posted September 24th, 2014 by Mark Szarko
photo by L.Barry Hetherington

photo by L.Barry Hetherington

The Libraries are hosting a series of classes all during the month of October! Some require registration and are filling up quickly – see below for details.

Resources from the OECD – Register
Thu October 9, 3:00 – 4:00 pm, 14N-132
Contact: Kate McNeill, mcneillh@mit.edu

The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) is coming to MIT! Join us to:

  • increase your knowledge of the world
  • get a leg up on your job search
  • enjoy some refreshments!

Join the Libraries for an event co-hosted and MIT Economics major Caroline Shinkle, the first-ever MIT student to be selected by the OECD to be a Student Ambassador. In this role, Caroline is raising awareness about the OECD within the MIT community.

Kathleen DeBoer, Deputy Head of the OECD Washington Center, will present about the OECD iLibrary (http://libraries.mit.edu/get/oecd), including:

  • Information the OECD provides on countries around the world, in areas such as:
    • Development
    • Employment
    • Energy
    • Environment
    • Trade
    • and more…
  •  How to efficiently extract data from their vast array of statistics

Note: For those interested in working for the OECD, Ms. DeBoer will be available to meet in the afternoon before and after the presentation to discuss the application process. If interested, contact her at Kathleen.DEBOER@oecd.org.

NIH Public Access Compliance Hands-on Working Session- Register

Thu October 14, 12:00 – 1:00 pm, 14N-132

Contact: Courtney Crummett, crummett@mit.edu

Missing a PMCID? Can’t figure out why a paper isn’t in compliance? Lost in NIH manuscript system? Join us for a problem solving session. This session is designed to provide an opportunity for hands on problem solving in the systems that need to be navigated in the process of submitting and authorizing manuscripts and reporting progress on NIH Funded Grants (eRA Commons; NIHMS, and MyNCBI). Please bring your NIH compliance problems and logins to this session to work through together.

Manage your PDFs and citations: Zotero and Mendeley – Register
Thu October 16, 2:00 – 3:00 pm, 14N-132
Contact: Jennie Murack, murack@mit.edu

Using citation management software to create and maintain a collection of references or PDFs is common and important in today’s academic world. These tools will help you to save citations from your favorite databases and websites, store related PDFs or attachments, and quickly build a bibliography for your papers and publications. We’ll review Zotero and Mendeley and show how to use them together to help your manage your PDF’s and citations.

Intro to GIS – Register
Tue October 21, 1:00 – 4:00 pm, 14N-132
Contact: Jennie Murack, murack@mit.edu

Learn the basics of visualizing and analyzing geographic information and creating your own maps in a Geographic Information System (GIS). We will introduce open source and proprietary GIS software options and let attendees choose to work through exercises using ESRI ArcGIS (proprietary) and/or Quantum GIS (QGIS) (open source). Learn to work with data from the MIT Geodata Repository, analyze the data, and create maps that can be used in reports and presentations.

Compute anything: Mathematica 10 and Wolfram Alpha Pro in education and research – Register
Wed October 22, 11:30 am – 12:30 pm, 14N-132
Contact: Jennie Murack, murack@mit.edu

This talk demonstrates capabilities in Mathematica 10 and Wolfram Alpha Pro that are directly applicable for use in teaching and research on campus. Topics include:

  • Enter calculations in everyday English, or using the flexible Wolfram Language
  • Visualize data, functions, surfaces, and more in 2D or 3D
  • Store and share documents locally or in the Wolfram Cloud
  • Use the Predictive Interface to get suggestions for the next useful calculation or function options
  • Access trillions of bits of on-demand data
  • Use semantic import to enrich your data using Wolfram curated data
  • Easily turn static examples into mouse-driven, dynamic applications
  • Access 10,000 free course-ready applications
  • Utilize the Wolfram Language’s wide scope of built-in functions, or create your own
  • Get deep support for specialized areas including machine learning, time series, image processing, parallelization, and control systems, with no add-ons required

Current users will benefit from seeing the many improvements and new features of Mathematica 10 (http://www.wolfram.com/mathematica/new-in-10/), but prior knowledge of Mathematica is not required.

Intro to R – Register
Wed October 22, 1:00 – 4:00 pm, 1-115
Contact: Jennie Murack, murack@mit.edu

Get an introduction to R, the open-source system for statistical computation and graphics. With hands-on exercises, learn how to import and manage datasets, create R objects, install and load R packages, conduct basic statistical analyses, and create common graphical displays. This workshop is appropriate for those with little or no prior experience with R.

Business Information for Engineers and Scientists – Register
Thu October 23, 1:00 – 2:00 pm, 14N-132
Contact: Howard Silver, hsilver@mit.edu

This session will introduce engineers and scientists to business information resources that will help you understand the commercial potential for your ideas, how to find partners, and sources for financial support. We will use realistic examples and hands-on exercises with key resources to demonstrate how to match your ideas and discoveries with the opportunities and realities of the marketplace.

Patent Searching Fundamentals – Register
Tue October 28, 12:00 – 1:00 pm, 14N-132
Contact: Anne Graham, grahama@mit.edu

This session will enable you to successfully find patent references from all over the world, and obtain patent text and diagrams. This hands-on session will help de-mystify the patent literature and show key resources for finding patents.

GIS Level 2 – Register
Tue October 28, 1:00 – 4:00 pm, 14N-132
Contact: Jennie Murack, murack@mit.edu

Expand your experience with GIS software and learn how to create and edit GIS files, geocode addresses onto a map, re-project data, and use tools like Clip, Buffer, and Spatial Join. Prerequisite: Intro to GIS workshop or basic knowledge of ArcGIS.

Managing Confidential Data – Register
Wed October 29, 9:00 am – 12:00 pm, 66-168
Contact: Randi Shapiro, shapiror@mit.edu

This tutorial provides a framework for identifying and managing confidential information in research. It is most appropriate for mid-late career graduate students, faculty, and professional research staff who actively engage in the design/planning of research. The course will provide an overview of the major legal requirements governing confidential research data; and the core technological measures used to safeguard data. And it will provide an introduction to the statistical methods and software tools used to analyze and limit disclosure risks.

R programming – Register
Wed October 29, 1:00 – 4:00 pm, 1-115
Contact: Jennie Murack, murack@mit.edu

This hands-on, intermediate R course will guide users through a variety of programming functions in the open-source statistical software program, R. This workshop covers blocks, loops, program flow, functions,S3 classes and methods, and debugging in R. This workshop is intended for those already comfortable with using R for data analysis who wish to move on to writing their own functions. Prerequisite: basic familiarity with R, such as acquired from an introductory R workshop.

Webinar: Managing your references: overview of Zotero, Mendeley, and EndNote – Register
Thu October 30, 5:00 – 6:00 pm
Contact: Peter Cohn, pcohn@mit.edu

Using citation management software to create and maintain a collection of references or PDFs is common and important in today’s academic world. These tools will help you to save citations from your favorite databases and websites, store related PDFs or attachments, and quickly build a bibliography for your papers and publications. We’ll compare and demo 3 tools (EndNote, Mendeley, & Zotero), so you’ll leave the session knowing which tool might work best for your needs.

This session will be offered over WebEx. Registrants will receive an email with details on how to join the meeting prior to the session. This session is open to the MIT Community.

Check out the complete listing of JulyAP 2014 sessions

Posted June 23rd, 2014 by Mark Szarko
photo by L.Barry Hetherington

photo by L.Barry Hetherington

Summer workshops in the Libraries are here! It’s like a little slice of IAP, only warmer.

Pre-registration is required for some, but not all sessions. See below for details.

Research Data Management: File Organization – Register
Thu July 10, 1:00 – 2:00 pm, 14N-132
Contact: Katherine McNeill, mcneillh@mit.edu

Do you struggle with organizing your research data? Wonder if there’s a better way to arrange and name your data files to optimize your work? This workshop will teach you practical techniques for organizing your data files. Topics will include: file and folder organizational structures and file naming.  Will include hands-on exercises to apply the concepts to your particular data project.

Introduction to GIS – Register
Mon July 14, 1:00 – 4:00 pm, 14N-132
Contact: Jennie Murack, murack@mit.edu

Learn the basics of visualizing and analyzing geographic information and creating your own maps in a Geographic Information System (GIS). We will introduce open source and proprietary GIS software options and let attendees choose to work through exercises using ESRI ArcGIS (proprietary) and/or Quantum GIS (QGIS) (open source). Learn to work with data from the MIT Geodata Repository, analyze the data, and create maps that can be used in reports and presentations.

GIS Level 2 – Register
Tue July 15, 1:00 – 4:00 pm, 14N-132
Contact: Jennie Murack, murack@mit.edu

Expand your experience with GIS software and learn how to create and edit GIS files, geocode addresses onto a map, re-project data, and use tools like Clip, Buffer, and Spatial Join. Prerequisite: Intro to GIS workshop or basic knowledge of ArcGIS

Getting Started, Getting Funded: Obtaining Research Funding – Register
Tue July 15, 1:00 – 5:00 pm, E17-139
Presenter: Dr. Micah Altman
Contact: Randi Shapiro, shapiror@mit.edu

Increasingly, conducting innovative research requires resources that exceed those readily on-hand to the individual scholar. You can use research funding to access a wider set of research methods, to accelerate your research project, expand its scope and depth, and increase its impact. This short course provides an overview of the types and sources of funding available for research support, and introduces the fundamental elements of planning, proposal writing, and management for “sponsored” projects. The course is geared toward junior faculty, postdocs, and graduate students (in late stages or on the job market), who are new to the funding process, are considering whether to seek funding from new sources, or who would like a systematic review of the grant writing and review process. The course will be presented in a half-day format, followed by an individualized consulting session focused on each attendee’s research project. Schedule individual consultations with Randi Shapiro at shapiror@mit.edu.

For more information, please consult the Program on Information Science Website.

Business Information for Engineers and Scientists – Register
Thu July 17, 4:00 – 5:00 pm, 14N-132
Contact: Howard Silver, hsilver@mit.edu

This session will introduce engineers and scientists to business information resources that will help you understand the commercial potential for your ideas, how to find partners, and sources for financial support. We will use realistic examples and hands-on exercises with key resources to demonstrate how to match your ideas and discoveries with the opportunities and realities of the marketplace.

Managing Your References: Overview of EndNote, Zotero, and Mendeley – Register
Mon July 21, 12:00 – 1:00 pm, 14N-132
Contact: Anita Perkins, perkins@mit.edu

Using citation management software to create and maintain a collection of references or PDFs is common and important in today’s academic world. These tools will help you to save citations from your favorite databases and websites, store related PDFs or attachments, and quickly build a bibliography for your papers and publications. We’ll compare and demo 3 tools (EndNote, Mendeley, & Zotero), so you’ll leave the session knowing which tool might work best for your needs.

Current and Emerging Uses for Wikipedia in Research – Register
Tue July 22, 1:00 – 2:00 pm, 14N-132
Contact: Stacey Snyder, ssnyder@mit.edu

“Well, actually…” you begin when the topic of Wikipedia’s accuracy comes up in conversation. If you’ve found yourself in this position, come share ways you have effectively used Wikipedia in your own research or in consultation with students and professors. Learn how to use complementary applications to guide you to valuable library resources. Join the discussion on the future of Wikipedia and the information landscape.

NIH Public Access Compliance Hands-on Working Session – Register
Thu July 24, 1:00 – 2:00 pm, 14N-132
Contact: Courtney Crummett, crummett@mit.edu

Missing a PMCID? Can’t figure out why a paper isn’t in compliance? Lost in NIH manuscript system? Join us for a problem solving session. This session is designed to provide an opportunity for hands on problem solving in the systems that need to be navigated in the process of submitting and authorizing manuscripts and reporting progress on NIH Funded Grants (eRA Commons; NIHMS, and MyNCBI). Please bring your NIH compliance problems and logins to this session to work through together. Registration encouraged.

Patent Searching Fundamentals – Register
Friday July 25, 1:00 – 2:00 pm, 14N-132
Contact: Anita Perkins, perkins@mit.edu

This session will enable you to successfully find patent references from all over the world, and obtain patent text and diagrams. This hands-on session will help de-mystify the patent literature and show key resources for finding patents.

Discovering the Libraries: Top 10 things to know

Posted June 5th, 2014 by Pritee Tembhekar

By MIT Libraries’ student blogger, Pri Tembhekar

Hello everyone!

It is with bittersweet sentiment that I write my last blog for the MIT Libraries. This post will be about the top 10 things to know about the Libraries. I’ve covered some of these tips in other posts, so this entry will be a good way to tie it all together.

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Bonus tip:The courtyard outside Hayden Library is a relaxing place to study.

  1. Library hideaways can make studying just a little better. The Libraries have many beautiful places to study and also contain 24-hour study rooms. Check out my post about the Lewis Music Library.
  2. Stop by the Libraries for textbooks. You don’t have to carry them around in order to study between classes. The Libraries have textbooks on reserve that you can check out for two hour increments. There are also some textbooks available online through the Libraries. It could save you significant money!
  3. Think outside your courses for fun options at the Libraries. The Libraries have resources well outside science and technology. The Libraries have videos and travel books. Check out my spring break post for more ideas.
  4. On a similar note, the Libraries can help you pursue your interests. The Lewis Library has concerts and open mics that could help nurture and preserve your interest in music. If art is more your style, the Libraries’ pass to the MFA allows you to take non-MIT friends along for free.
  5. Student jobs at the MIT Libraries are a fantastic way to make money and learn. There are many ways to get involved. From the student workers I interviewed, I really got the sense that working at the Libraries had become more than just a job. In my short time here I have learned a lot about blogging and felt a community among the Libraries’ staff. Check out my student jobs post.
  6. The libraries can make research less painful! For in-depth, longer-term research making an appointment with a librarian can go a long way. Subject matter experts can really push you in the right direction. See my post on research resources for more information.
  7. Research guides provide a quicker fix and concise information. They can be accessed online and cover a wide range of subjects. More information is available in the research resources post.
  8. One of the lesser known Libraries’ resources are the range of special events they host. During their IAPril series of events, I learned about using Mendeley software to manage PDFs and citations. There were also events on 3-D printing and business resources. Some events can be really surprising. For example, preservation week brought a letter locking event to MIT.
  9. Meet at least one librarian or staff member during your time at MIT. When I met Jana Dambrogio, I was amazed by her passion for letter locking, something I had never heard of. Not only are they incredible resources, but the Libraries’ staff have unique interests that are refreshing for someone immersed in science and technology.
  10. The Libraries’ scanners are fantastic. They create high quality images with no hassle. When I asked a few senior friends what they liked best, this was the most surprising answer.

I hope you’ve enjoyed reading my blog as much as I’ve enjoyed writing it! There’s an excellent video on this topic made by the Libraries and featuring students. Best of luck readers!

Learn more about Mendeley–with pizza!

Posted April 17th, 2014 by Katherine McNeill

Mendeley logo

Meet Mendeley Representatives–Refreshments served!

When: Friday April 25th 3:30-5pm

Where: 14N-132

Come eat pizza and learn more about Mendeley, a tool that helps you manage and share pdfs and easily generate citations and bibliographies when writing.  Representatives from Mendeley,  MIT Mendeley Advisors and library staff will be on hand to meet you, answer your questions and get feedback on this great tool.

RSVP for the event.

Enhanced Mendeley Access for MIT Users

The MIT Libraries has purchased Mendeley Institutional Edition for the MIT community.  This gives MIT users more personal and shared space than what is available with a free Mendeley account.  To find out more see our Mendeley page.

Questions? Email personal-content@mit.edu

Discovering the Libraries: IAPril!

Posted April 14th, 2014 by Pritee Tembhekar

By MIT Libraries’ student blogger, Pri Tembhekar

Hello everyone! This week’s post is about the Libraries series of April events called IAPril. Many of these are hands-on events to help you solve particular problems or learn about resources in the Libraries. Essentially, it’s like a tiny piece of that wonderful IAP month compressed into 1-2 hours. If you are like me, you often tell yourself that you’ll download software or check out new offerings at a later time. However, without live training or a spot on my calendar, resources that could make my life easier often fall to the wayside. Needless to say that self-motivation is difficult. Enter the IAPril events. These events are diverse but all focus on a way that the Libraries can make research, citations, data analysis, or life in general easier!  In case you’re already sold, you can see the full listings and register here.

Last Wednesday I attended the event on Mendeley basics.  Mendeley is a free tool that can help you organize and manage your citations and PDFs. As a part of senior year in chemical engineering, I am completing a long and arduous design project. One major point of feedback our team received last week was that our citations were weak. This came as no surprise since each member had been writing feverishly with little attention to collaborating and combining the citations of the team. Streamlined software to share and cite the many PDFs we had in fact used would have been useful.

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A library workshop on Mendeley Basics

Learning about Mendeley during the event was much more effective than if I had done it independently. The event instructor was accessible and answered many audience questions. The session ended up being very interactive because a couple of audience members had extensive experience with the software.  I learned that I could easily save PDFs with a browser add-on. A Word add-on allows me to cite it as I write. Notating and highlighting the PDF can also be done within the Mendeley software. Some quotes from the audience on why they use Mendeley:

“It’s amazing for managing a PDF library.”

“You get a great amount of space.”

Although the software still has some bugs around being compatible with other citation software such as Refworks, it might be worth a shot! The most important take away for me was that I still have a lot to learn about resources in the Libraries. IAPril is a great way to dive in and keeping my eyes open is a must. I look forward to continuing to discover the Libraries with you!

Spring into IAPril classes and events!

Posted March 27th, 2014 by Stephanie Hartman

Spring is finally here! While you wait for Mother Nature to cooperate, check out the April offerings from the MIT Libraries. Something for everyone!

If you have any questions or feedback, let us know! Connect with us on Twitter or Facebook.

Preservation Week, April 29–May 1: Explore the art and science of preserving cultural heritage

Posted March 27th, 2014 by Heather Denny

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Join us for a variety of events that highlight the importance of preserving cultural heritage materials during National Preservation Week.

Tuesday, April 29th, starting at 12 pm

The Art and Science of Document Security: Past, Present, and Future, 32-144 A series of talks presenting research on historical, contemporary, and novel methods for creating secure documents in all forms. Join us for one session or several. There will be breaks for refreshments and questions throughout.

  • 12:15 pm “Our Marathon”: The Boston Bombing Digital Archive
    Our Marathon is a crowd-sourced digital archive of stories, photos, video, and social media related to the Boston Marathon bombings and aftermath. Join us for a brown bag talk with Jim McGrath and Alicia Peaker from the Our Marathon team for an overview of the project and the archive.
  • 1:00 pm      Opening Remarks
  • 1:15 pm     Our Digital Lives: Protecting Our Data In Use and At Rest, Michael Halsall, Senior Network and Information Security Analyst at MIT

  • 1:45 pm    Benign Neglect No More: How Document Security Affects Access to Memory, Kari R. Smith, Digital Archivist, MIT Libraries Institute Archives and Special Collections
  • 2:45 pm    Historic Letterlocking: The Art and Security of Letterwriting, Jana Dambrogio, Thomas F. Peterson (1957) Conservator, MIT Libraries Curation and Preservation Services
  • 4:00 pm    Thanks for the Memory: 50+ Years of Computing at MIT exhibit, 14N-130 Gallery visit led by Nora Murphy, Archivist for Reference, Outreach, and Instruction, MIT Institute Archives and Special Collections, Maihaugen Gallery  

  • 8:00 pm   The Monuments Men Movie Screening, 26-100 Enjoy a free screening of The Monuments Men. George Clooney portrays a local art conservation hero George Stout who saved cultural heritage from ruin during WWII.

Wednesday, April 30th, 11 am-3 pm

  • Our Marathon “Share Your Story” event, 10-105 Representatives from the Our Marathon online collection of Boston Marathon Bombing experiences will be on campus to document the personal experiences of the MIT community during and after the 2013 Boston Marathon Bombing.

May 1st, 2-3 pm

  • Scrapbook Preservation webinar, 14N-132 Interested in preserving your own items? Join us for a free webinar about scrapbook preservation hosted by the American Library Association. Melissa Tedone, Conservator of the Parks Library Preservation Department at Iowa State University, will talk about older scrapbooks as well as how to identify the most stable materials for new scrapbooks.

All events are free and open to the public. For more information contact preservation-team@mit.edu, or see the Preservation Week website.

Check out the complete listing of IAPril 2014 sessions

Posted March 19th, 2014 by Mark Szarko

Pre-registration is required for some, but not all sessions. See below for details.

Class in the Digital Instruction Resource Center

photo by L.Barry Hetherington

Managing your references: Overview of EndNote, Mendeley, and Zotero – Register
Tue April 1, 12:00 – 1:00 pm, 14N-132
Contact: Remlee Green, remlee@mit.edu

Using citation management software to create and maintain a collection of references or PDFs is common and important in today’s academic world. These tools will help you to save citations from your favorite databases and websites, store related PDFs or attachments, and quickly build a bibliography for your papers and publications. We’ll compare and demo 3 tools (EndNote, Mendeley, & Zotero), so you’ll leave the session knowing which tool might work best for your needs.

Please register for this session.

3D Printing for Fun and Science? A Conversation about Digital Fabrication, the Library, and You – Register
Tue April 8, 11:00am – 12:30 pm, 3-442
Contact: Randi Shapiro, shapiror@mit.edu

Digital fabrication has changed considerably over the last few decades. Barriers to use have fallen, and technologies that were once the purview of specialized researchers are now sold in retail outlets like Sears, Staples and the Microsoft store. Schools and libraries have even begun getting into the act, from NC State to the Chicago Public Library.

Applications include producing prosthetic hands for accident victims, manufacturing replacement part for hard-to-source components, or even mapping word frequency across the history of a given journal and printing time series histograms.

But what about here at MIT?

This session will discuss the range of fabrication technologies now available, as well as those available at MIT, for sale, for rent, and (for a limited time, experimentally) through the Libraries. As part of this session, the Libraries have acquired a MakerBot Replicator 2 that is capable of producing objects in PLA plastic.

Plus, participants will have the opportunity to see a 3D-printer in action and even design their own objects – submit a printable file, generated by the free MakerWare software, by Tuesday, April 1st. Up to five submissions will be selected for production before the discussion (provided the designs are producible!).

(Hint: You can try turning a photo into a 3D model with 123D Catch.)

Presenter: Matt Bernhardt, Web Developer, MIT Libraries

Please register for this session.

Mendeley Basics – Register
Wed April 9, 12:00 – 1:00 pm, 14N-132
Contact: Peter Cohn,  pcohn@mit.edu

Mendeley is a free tool that can help you organize and manage your citations and PDFs. Learn how to use Mendeley to discover the latest research, collaborate with others, and automatically generate bibliographies.

Please register for this class.

Business Information for Engineers and Scientists – Register
Tue April 15, 1:00 – 2:00 pm, 14N-132
Contact: Howard Silver, hsilver@mit.edu

This session will introduce engineers and scientists to business information resources that will help you understand the commercial potential for your ideas, how to find partners, and sources for financial support. We will use realistic examples and hands-on exercises with key resources to demonstrate how to match your ideas and discoveries with the opportunities and realities of the marketplace.

Overview of Citation Analysis – Register
Tue April 15, 2:30 – 4:30 pm, 66-144
Time: 2:30-4:30 pm
Contact: Randi Shapiro, shapiror@mit.edu

Whose articles cite a body of work? Is this a high impact journal? How might others assess my scholarly impact? Citation analysis is one of the primary methods used to answer these questions.

Academics, publishers, and funders often study the patterns of citations in the academic literature in order to explore the relationships among researchers, topics, and publications, and to measure the impact of articles, journals, and individuals.

In this two-hour workshop, we will provide an overview of citation analysis, including: sources of data for citation analysis, common impact measures, and freely available software.

Attendees of the class will be eligible for an individual consultation session to explore individual projects and questions.

Presenter(s): Dr. Micah Altman, Director of Research, MIT Libraries; Sean Thomas, Program Manager for Scholarly Repository Services, MIT Libraries

Please register for this class.

Endnote Basics – Register
Wed April 16, 5:00 – 6:00 pm, 14N-132
Contact: Anita Perkins, perkins@mit.edu

EndNote is a “personal bibliographic software” package which allows you to create and manage a database of bibliographic references. Learn how to find and use information more effectively in our hands-on workshop.

Please register for this class.

NIH Public Access Compliance Hands-on Working Session - Register
Thu April 24, 1:00-2:00 pm, 14N-132
Contact: Courtney Crummett, crummett@mit.edu

Missing a PMCID? Can’t figure out why a paper isn’t in compliance? Lost in the NIH manuscript system? Join us for a problem solving session.

This session is designed to provide an opportunity for hands on problem solving in the systems that need to be navigated in the process of submitting and authorizing manuscripts and reporting progress on NIH Funded Grants (eRA Commons; NIHMS, and MyNCBI). Please bring your NIH compliance problems to this session to work through together. Registration encouraged.

Patent searching fundamentals
Thu April 24, 5:00 – 6:00 pm, 14N-132 – Register
Or
Fri April 25, 12:00 – 1:00 pm, 14N-132 – Register
Contact: Anita Perkins, perkins@mit.edu and Anne Graham, grahama@mit.edu

You won’t come out of this session qualified to be a patent attorney, but you will be able to successfully find patent references from all over the world, and know how to find patent text and diagrams. This will be a hands-on session that will help de-mystify the patent literature and show key resources for finding patents through free resources available on the web.

Going beyond Google Scholar: Using the Web of Science and Other Citation Searching Resources to Discover Articles
Mon April 28, 12:00 – 1:00 pm, 14N-132
Contact: Michael M Noga, mnoga@mit.edu

Do you usually look for articles by searching keywords and authors? Try tracking ideas back and forth through time by searching citations to and from articles, reports and other scholarly literature. Citation searching started with the Science Citation Index (Web of Science) and now is part of several other information sources such as Scopus, e-journal collections, and Google Scholar. We will look at several places where you can find scholarly literature through citations and the different results you can get.

Collect and Create Your Own Geographic Data – Register
Mon April 28, 2:00 – 4:00 pm, 14N-132
Contact: Jennie Murack, murack@mit.edu

Can’t find the data you need online? No problem! In this workshop we’ll learn how to collect data in the field using GPS units and phone apps and then use it in GIS software. We’ll also explore georeferencing scanned maps, drawing new data layers (like roads or rivers), and mapping points from a spreadsheet based on coordinates or addresses. Prerequisite: A basic knowledge of GIS and ArcGIS software

Discussion: Scientific imaging for artwork & other cultural heritage materials

Posted February 20th, 2014 by Heather Denny

Discussion: Thursday, February 27, 2014, 11:00 am, 14N-132 (DIRC)

CulturalHeritageImage

Detail: Two modes of Reflectance Transformation Imaging. The bottom view shows a Japanese woodcut in “Normal” mode. The top view shows the “Specular Enhancement” mode, which removes color virtually to reveal the subtle surface impressions made in the paper by the artist. © Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco. Konishi Hirosada, artist, Osaka Actor Mimasu Daigoro IV , color woodcut with embossing and metallic pigment, c. 1851-59.

New scientific imaging tools offer the capability to see distinctive details on a 16th century rare book cover, a manuscript, or a work of art, that can’t be seen with the naked eye. Please join the MIT Libraries’ Curation and Preservation Services Department for a fascinating look at how this technology can help us to learn more about our cultural heritage materials, and how to best preserve them.

Carla Schroer, of the non-profit Cultural Heritage Imaging, will discuss the new empirical capture and analysis tools Reflectance Transformation Imaging (RTI), Algorithmic Rendering (AR), and image-based Structure from Motion (SFM) generation of textured 3D geometry. These techniques will be explored in the context of the emerging science of “Computational Photography.” Computational Photography extracts and synthesizes information from image sequences to create a new type of image containing information not found in any single image in the sequence. This technology is in use in many areas from major art museums to remote archaeological sites to fields in the natural sciences.

The event is free and open to the public, no registration required.

Learn quantitative methods at ICPSR this summer–registration opens today!

Posted February 10th, 2014 by Katherine McNeill

Need to expand your skills in statistical methods and quantitative analysis? Attend the ICPSR Summer Program! Each year, ICPSR provides a comprehensive, integrated program of studies in research design, statistics, data analysis, and social science methodology. Registration is now open for the 2014 session.  Note: MIT attendees can register at a discount and scholarships are available.

For a listing of course offerings and application information, see the ICPSR Summer Program web site.  Courses this year include:

Note that while most courses are held at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, some are held in nearby Amherst, MA or New York, NY.

———————————————

And don’t forget ICPSR as a source of quantitative data on a range of topics: from markets, election statistics, health, education, international relations, social attitudes and behavior, and more!  Recently added datasets include:

In other news, attend an upcoming Webinar: Resources for Health Research from ICPSR.

For further information, contact Katherine McNeill, Social Science Data Services Librarian, at mcneillh@mit.edu.

IAP prize opportunity for students!

Posted January 23rd, 2014 by Katharine Dunn

There are still spots open for the Libraries’ “Fair Use & Images: Quiz Tool Beta Test” IAP session on January 30th at 12 pm, room 14N-132. If you’re one of the first 10 undergraduate or graduate students to register, you get a $20 Amazon gift certificate just for coming and giving us feedback on the quiz. During the session we’ll also draw names for two $50 Amazon gift certificates.

The quiz is intended to shed light on aspects of copyright, including how to determine whether a use of an online image is “fair” under US copyright law, as well as related legal issues about using images on your website, blog, or in social media.

To sign up, contact Ellen Duranceau, 14S-216, 617 253-8483, EFINNIE@MIT.EDU

Thanks, MIT music, for your dulcet tones.

Posted January 17th, 2014 by Jana Dambrogio

This week was an all-things-MIT-Music for the conservation lab. We de-installed the “Noteworthy Connections” exhibition in the Maihaugen Gallery  featuring the music treasures from the Lewis Music Library and the Institute Archives and Special Collections.

photo copy

MIT’s Chorallaries, an a cappella music group, provides cheerful music to listen to while we make protective enclosures for some of the illuminated music manuscripts folios that will be used for teaching next semester. We are curious to discover more “whistle-while-you-work” music created by MIT faculty, staff, and students.

Bound by Hand–Bookbindings created in the Libraries’ Conservation Lab

Posted January 7th, 2014 by Jana Dambrogio

Today is the first day of two Individual Activity Program (IAP) classes the conservation lab is offering. Participants are learning how to transform paper, cloth, board, thread, and glue into two types of blank books–pamphlet and flat back case bindings. Fabricating these foundational book structures reminds us here in the conservation lab why we love books, why we love to make them, and why we are dedicated to preserve them for access-old and new.

Pamphlet bindings made by hand with thread and paper.

A participant is creating the cover for the flat back case binding. Case bindings are made by creating the text block and cover separately; they are attached to each other to create a book.

Instructors for the class: Conservation Assistant Ayako Letizia and Preservation Associate Kate Beattie from the Wunsch Conservation Laboratory, Curation and Preservation Services.

IAP 2014: Life Sciences

Posted December 10th, 2013 by Mark Szarko

The MIT Libraries is hosting a series of classes related to the life sciences this IAP. Some classes require registration.microscope

Bioinformatics for Beginners
Wed Jan 8, 3:00pm-4:30pm, 14N-132
Fri Jan 10, 10:00am-11:30am, 14N-132
Contact: Courtney Crummett, crummett@mit.edu

Learn to Use IPA during IAP
Mon Jan 13, 2:00pm-4:00pm, 14N-132
Contact: Courtney Crummett, crummett@mit.edu

Biotech Business Information for Engineers and Scientists
Wed Jan 15, 4:00pm-5:00pm, 14N-132
Contact: Courtney Crummett, crummett@mit.edu

Protocols and Methods: Recipes for Research
Thu Jan 16, 12:00pm-1:00pm, 14N-132
Contact: Howard Silver, hsilver@mit.edu

NIH Public Access Compliance Hands-on Working Session
Fri Jan 17, 11:00am-12:00pm, 14N-132
Contact: Courtney Crummett, crummett@mit.edu

Get the Most from Your “omics” Analysis: GeneGo MetaCore Software Training
Wed Jan 22, 3:00pm-5:00pm, 14N-132
Contact: Courtney Crummett, crummett@mit.edu

BIOBASE Knowledge Library
Thu Jan 23, 1:00-4:30pm, 14N-132
Contact: Courtney Crummett, crummett@mit.edu

How to Get the Most from the Koch Institute Bioinformatics Support and Computational Resources
Mon Jan 27, 9:00am-11:00am, 14N-132
Contact: Courtney Crummett, crummett@mit.edu

For a complete list of IAP classes offered by the Libraries, please see our Calendar of Events.

Check Out the Complete Listing of IAP 2014 Sessions

Posted December 9th, 2013 by Mark Szarko

photo by L.Barry Hetherington

The MIT Libraries probably has what you need this IAP, offering over 70 different classes! Topics covered include:

Some classes require registration. For a complete list of IAP classes offered by the Libraries, please see our Calendar of Events.

IAP 2014: GIS

Posted December 9th, 2013 by Mark Szarko
River

Photo Courtesy of the National Science Foundation

The MIT Libraries is hosting a series of classes on GIS this IAP! For more information, please contact Jennie Murack. All classes require registration.

Introduction to GIS
Wed Jan 15, 1:00pm-4:00pm, 14N-132
Tue Jan 21, 1:00pm-4:00pm, 14N-132

Energy Information: Maps and Data to Use with GIS
Thu Jan 16, 1:00pm-2:30pm, 14N-132

Spatial Statistics: Spatial Autocorrelation
Fri Jan 17, 1:00pm-3:00pm, 14N-132

Spatial Statistics: Regression
Wed Jan 22, 1:00pm-3:00pm, 14N-132

GIS Level 2
Fri Jan 24, 1:00pm-3:00pm, 14N-132

Interpolation in ArcGIS
Mon Jan 27, 1:00pm-3:00pm, 14N-132

Resources for Free and Open GIS Data
Tue Jan 28, 1:00pm-3:00pm, 14N-132

Using Network Analyst in ArcMap
Wed Jan 29, 1:00pm-3:00pm, 14N-132

Python Programming in ArcGIS: An Introduction to Scripting for Geographic Analysis Systems
Session 1: Thu Jan 30, 9:30am-12:30pm, GIS Lab in Rotch Library 7-238
Session 2: Fri Jan 31, 9:30am-12:30pm, GIS Lab in Rotch Library 7-238

Hydrology Tools with GIS
Thu Jan 30, 10:00am-12:00pm, 14N-132

For a complete list of IAP classes offered by the Libraries, please see our Calendar of Events.

IAP 2014: Statistical Software Workshops

Posted December 9th, 2013 by Mark Szarko

Looking to gain skills in working with statistical analysis software packages during IAP? The following classes will be taught by Libraries’ staff and the Harvard-MIT Data Center (HMDC) Statistical Trainer. For more information, please contact Jennie Murack. All classes require registration.stats

An Overview of Statistical Software
Mon Jan 13, 10:00am-11:30am, 1-115

Introduction to Stata
Tue Jan 14, 1:00pm-3:00pm, 1-115
MIT only: Athena login required

Introduction to SAS
Thu Jan 16, 9:00am-12:00pm, 1-115
MIT only: Athena login required

Data Management in Stata
Thu Jan 16, 1:00pm-4:00pm, 1-115
MIT only: Athena login required

Regression in Stata
Fri Jan 17, 9:00am-12:00pm, 1-115
MIT only: Athena login required

Graphing in Stata
Fri Jan 17, 1:00pm-3:00pm, 1-115
MIT only: Athena login required

Introduction to R
Thu Jan 23, 9:00am-12:00pm, 1-115, MIT only: Athena login required
Thu Jan 23, 1:00am-4:00pm, 1-115, MIT only: Athena login required

R Programming
Fri Jan 24, 9:00am-12:00pm, 1-115, MIT only: Athena login required
Fri Jan 24, 1:00pm-4:00pm, 1-115, MIT only: Athena login required

R Regression Models
Thu Jan 30, 9:00am-12:00pm, 1-115
MIT only: Athena login required

Introduction to R Graphics
Thu Jan 30, 1:00-4:00pm, 1-115
MIT only; Athena login required

For a complete list of IAP classes offered by the Libraries, please see our Calendar of Events.

IAP 2014: Research Funding and Other Academic Tools

Posted December 9th, 2013 by Mark Szarko

The MIT Libraries is hosting a series of classes to help make your research easier! Join us for topics that range from 3D printing to how find research funding to using Evernote. Some require registration.stacks

3D Printing for Fun and Science? A Conversation about Digital Fabrication, the Library, and You
Tue Jan 14, 1:00pm-2:30pm, Location 56-114
Contact: Randi Shapiro, shapiror@mit.edu

Energy Sci/Tech Information: Where to Go, What to Do
Tu Jan 14, 3:00pm-4:00pm, 14N-132
Contact: Chris Sherratt, gcsherra@mit.edu

To Infinity and Beyond: Borrowing from a Galaxy of Libraries
Wed Jan 15, 11:00am-12:00pm, 14N-132
Contact: Sarah Desautels, sdesaute@mit.edu

Unlocking the Secrets of Company Databases
Wed Jan 15, 2:00pm-3:00pm, 3-133
Contact: Lily Zhang, lilyz@mit.edu

Introduction to Evernote and Skitch
Fri Jan 17, 3:00pm-4:00pm, 14N-132
Contact: Kari Smith, smithkr@mit.edu

Getting Started, Getting Funded: Obtaining Research Funding
Thu Jan 23, 10:00am–1:00pm, 66-154
Contact: Randi Shapiro, shapiror@mit.edu

Business Information for Engineers and Scientists
Tue Jan 28, 4:00pm-5:00pm, 14N-132
Contact: Howard Silver, hsilver@mit.edu

Getting Started, Getting Funded: Obtaining Research Funding
Tue Jan 28, 9:00am-1:00pm, E25-117
Contact: Randi Shapiro, shapiror@mit.edu

BartonPlus – Find Articles, Books, and More
Wed Jan 29, 10:00am-11:30am, 14N-132
Contact: Georgiana McReynolds, gmac@mit.edu

How Do the Libraries Select Books for the Shelves and Your Computer Access?
Wed Jan 29, 12:00pm-1:00pm, 14N-132
Contact: Michael Noga, mnoga@mit.edu

For a complete list of IAP classes offered by the Libraries, please see our Calendar of Events.

IAP 2014: Patents and Copyright

Posted December 9th, 2013 by Mark Szarko

The MIT Libraries is offering several classes on patents and copyright during IAP! Some require registration.Magazines

Using Images in Your Work: A Look at Fair Use, Open Licensing, Copyright, and Identifying and Citing Images
Fri Jan 10, 1:00pm-2:15pm, 14N-132
Contact: Ellen Duranceau, efinnie@mit.edu

An Introduction to Independent Publishing
Tue Jan 14, 1:00pm-2:15pm, 14N-132
Contact: Katharine Dunn, khdunn@mit.edu

Patent Searching Fundamentals
Tue Jan 14, 4:00pm-5:00pm, 14N-132
Fri Jan 24, 12:00pm-1:00pm, 14N-132
Contact: Howard Silver, hsilver@mit.edu

Fair Use and E-Reserves
Wed Jan 22, 11:00am-12:00pm, 14N-132
Contact: Molly McInerney, mcinerne@mit.edu

Basics of Obtaining a Patent
Wed Jan 29, 2-3:30pm, Location 4-163
Contact: Howard Silver, hsilver@mit.edu

Fair Use and Images: Quiz Tool Beta Test
Thu Jan 30, 12:00pm-1:00pm, 14N-132
Contact: Ellen Duranceau, efinnie@mit.edu

Theses@MIT: Specifications and Copyright Issues
Fri Jan 31, 1:00pm-2:15pm, 14N-132
Contact: Ellen Duranceau, efinnie@mit.edu

For a complete list of IAP classes offered by the Libraries, please see our Calendar of Events.

IAP 2014: Mapping

Posted December 9th, 2013 by Mark Szarko

The MIT Libraries is hosting a series of classes on related to maps this IAP. All classes require registration. For more information, please contact Jennie Murackmap2

Web Mapping for the Masses: OpenLayers
Thu Jan 23, 10:00am-12:00pm, GIS Lab in Rotch Library 7-238

Web Mapping for the Masses: TileMill
Fri Jan 24, 10:00am-12:00pm, GIS Lab in Rotch Library 7-238

Make a Map: No GIS Experience Required!
Tue Jan 28, 10:00am-12:00pm, 14N-132

Google Tools for Mapping
Thu Jan 30, 1:00pm-3:00pm, 14N-132

Making the Most of Maps at MIT
Fri Jan 31, 10:00am-11:30am, 14N-132

For a complete list of IAP classes offered by the Libraries, please see our Calendar of Events.

IAP 2014: Managing and Citing Your Information

Posted December 9th, 2013 by Mark Szarko

Looking for some tips on managing and citing your research? The MIT Libraries is hosting a series of classes over IAP to help. Some classes require registration.Data Tunnel

EndNote Basics
Wed Jan 8, 5:00pm-6:00pm, 14N-132
Contact: Anita Perkins, perkins@mit.edu

Research Data Management: 101
Fri Jan 9, 2:00pm-3:00pm, 14N-132
Contact: Katherine McNeill, mcneillh@mit.edu

Managing Your References: Overview of EndNote, Mendeley, and Zotero
Tue Jan 14, 12:00pm-1:00pm, 14N-132
Contact: Peter Cohn, pcohn@mit.edu

Take Charge of Your Stuff: Personal Content Management Tools
Wed Jan 15, 12:00pm-1:00PM, 14N-132
Contact: Peter Cohn, pcohn@mit.edu

Zotero Basics
Tue Jan 21, 11:00am-12:00pm, 14N-132
Contact: Jennie Murack, murack@mit.edu

Research Data Management: Organization
Wed Jan 22, 10:00am-11:00am, 14N-132
Contact: Katherine McNeill, mcneillh@mit.edu

Mendeley Basics
Thu Jan 23, 12:00pm-1:00pm, 14N-132
Contact: Peter Cohn, pcohn@mit.edu

For a complete list of IAP classes offered by the Libraries, please see our Calendar of Events.

IAP 2014: Data Tools and File Management

Posted December 9th, 2013 by Mark Szarko

The MIT Libraries is hosting a series of classes on data tools and file management this IAP. Some classes require registration.data

Managing Confidential Data
Wed Jan 15, 10:00am-1:00pm, 66-148
Contact: Randi Shapiro, shapiror@mit.edu

Public Opinion Data Resources
Thu Jan 16, 11:00am-12:00pm, 14N-132
Contact: Katherine McNeill, mcneillh@mit.edu

Finding Research Datasets
Thu Jan 23, 9:30am-11:00am, 14N-132
Contact: Katherine McNeill, mcneillh@mit.edu

For a complete list of IAP classes offered by the Libraries, please see our Calendar of Events.

 

IAP 2014: Culture, Arts, and Society

Posted December 9th, 2013 by Mark Szarko

Join the MIT Libraries for a series of classes on topics that range from letterlocking to the music of the Arab Spring. Some classes require registration.Beaver

Creative Bookbinding 2014
Tue Jan 7, 10:00am-12:30pm, 14-0513
Wed Jan 8, 10:00am-12:30pm, 14-0513
Contact: Kate Beattie, knb@mit.edu

Rare Book Speed Dating
Fri Jan 10, 10:30am-11:00am, 14N-118
Fri Jan 10, 11:15am-11:45am, 14N-118
Contact: Audrey Pearson, pearsona@mit.edu

Library Music! Open Mic in the Lewis Music Library
Fri Jan 10, 12:00pm-1:00pm, 14E-109
Fri Jan 24, 12:00pm-1:00pm, 14E-109
Contact: Peter Munstedt, pmunsted@mit.edu

Using Images in Your Work: A Look at Fair Use, Open Licensing, Copyright, and Identifying and Citing Images
Fri Jan 10, 1:00pm-2:15pm, 14N-132
Contact: Ellen Duranceau, efinnie@mit.edu

A Conversation with Ta’Nehisi Coates about Reading, Writing, and Libraries
Mon Jan 13, 11:00am-12pm, 14E-304
Contact: Patsy Baudoin, patsy@mit.edu

Leave It to the Beavers: A Snapshot of Life at MIT in the 1950s
Fri Jan 24, 2:00pm-3:30pm, 14N-118
Contact: Camille Torres Hoven, cttorres@mit.edu

Historic Letterlocking: The Art and Security of Letterwriting
Tue Jan 28, 10:00am-3:00pm, 14-0513
Wed, Jan 29, 10:00am-3:00pm, 14-0513
Contact: Jana Dambrogio, jld@mit.edu

Rap, Rai, Rock, and Revolution: The Role of Music in the “Arab Spring”
Tue Jan 28, 3:00pm-5:00pm, 3-133
Contact: Michael Toler, mtoler@mit.edu

For a complete list of IAP classes offered by the Libraries, please see our Calendar of Events.

Webinar: Measure change over time with the American Community Survey

Posted December 6th, 2013 by Katherine McNeill

acs

Want to research change over time in social and economic trends for states and local areas across the U.S.?  Use the American Community Survey!

American Community Survey data are released in annual or multiyear estimates (depending upon geographic area) and measure citizens’ experiences in a wide range of social and economic issues.  However, assessing trends over time can be challenging when working with ACS multiyear estimates, so get tips in an upcoming Census webinar: Using the ACS to Measure Trends Over Time.

In this webinar, demographers, planners, and researchers will provide guidance for measuring trends with ACS data.

WHEN: Friday, December 13, 2013, 1–2 p.m. (EST)

Space is limited. Register.

Fall IAP classes are here!

Posted September 24th, 2013 by Mark Szarko

The Libraries are hosting a series of classes all during the month of October! Some require registration and are filling up quickly – see below for details.

photo by L.Barry Hetherington

photo by L.Barry Hetherington

Managing your references: Overview of EndNote, Zotero, & Mendeley – Register
Thu October 3, 11:00 am – 12:00 pm, 14N-132
Contact: Remlee Green, remlee@mit.edu

Using citation management software to create and maintain a collection of references or PDFs is becoming more common and important in today’s academic world. These software packages (EndNote, Zotero, & Mendeley) allow users to search databases, retrieve relevant citations, and build a bibliography to be added to a paper or thesis or stored for future reference. We’ll take a look at these 3 tools.

Please register for this session.

Intro to R – Register
Thu October 3, 1:00 – 4:00 pm, 1-115
Contact: Jennie Murack, murack@mit.edu

Get an introduction to R, the open-source system for statistical computation and graphics. With hands-on exercises, learn how to import and manage datasets, create R objects, install and load R packages, conduct basic statistical analyses, and create common graphical displays.

Prerequisite: This workshop is appropriate for those with little or no prior experience with R. MIT only – Athena login required.

Please register for this session.

Introduction to GIS for Architecture – Register
Fri October 4, 1:00 – 3:00 pm, 14N-132
Contact: Jennie Murack, murack@mit.edu

GIS is for architects too! Learn how to complete simple tasks using ArcMap GIS software, including making a basic map and exporting to CAD. This workshop is geared toward architecture students or those looking to learn how GIS can be used for architecture-related tasks.

Please register for this session.

Patent Searching Fundamentals
Thu Oct 10, 1:00 – 2:00 pm, 14N-132 – Register
Thu Oct 24, 1:00 – 2:00 pm, 14N-132 – Register
Contact: Howard Silver, hsilver@mit.edu

While you won’t come out of this session qualified to be a patent attorney, you will be able to successfully find patent references from all over the world and know how to obtain patent text and diagrams. The session will be a hands-on practicum that will help de-mystify the patent literature and expose attendees to key resources for finding patents through free resources available on the web.

Please register for either the 10/10 or 10/24 session.

Intro to GIS – Register
Mon October 7, 1:00 – 4:00 pm, 14N-132
Contact: Jennie Murack, murack@mit.edu

Learn the basics of visualizing and analyzing geographic information and creating your own maps in a Geographic Information System (GIS). We will introduce open source and proprietary GIS software options and let attendees choose to work through exercises using ESRI ArcGIS (proprietary) and/or Quantum GIS (QGIS) (open source). Learn to work with data from the MIT Geodata Repository, analyze the data, and create maps that can be used in reports and presentations.

Please register for this session.

R Programming – Register
Thu October 10, 1:00 – 4:00 pm, 1-115
Contact: Jennie Murack, murack@mit.edu

This intermediate R course will guide users through a variety of programming functions. This workshop covers blocks, loops, program flow, functions, S3 classes and methods, and debugging in R. This workshop is intended for those already comfortable with using R for data analysis who wish to move on to writing their own functions.

Prerequisite: A basic familiarity with R, such as acquired from an introductory R workshop. MIT only – Athena login required.

Please register for this session.

To Infinity and Beyond: Borrowing from a Galaxy of Libraries – Register
Fri October 18, 2:00 – 3:00 pm, 14N-132
Contact: Pat Page, pagep@mit.edu

Did you know you can access a universe of resources? Don’t let your research end with MIT’s holdings—this workshop will show you three trajectories to borrowing from non-MIT collections. We’ll explore the different benefits of these trajectories, so you can take your research to infinity—and beyond!

Please register for this session.

Endnote Basics – Register
Fri Oct 25, 12:00 – 1:00 pm, 14N-132
Contact: Anita Perkins, perkins@mit.edu

EndNote is a “personal bibliographic software” package which allows you to create and manage a database of bibliographic references. Learn how to find and use information more effectively in our hands-on workshop.

Please register for this session.

Course Reserves at the MIT Libraries – Register
Wed October 30, 1:00 – 2:00 pm, 14N-132
Contact: Molly McInerney, mcinerne@mit.edu

Are you a new instructor or teaching assistant at MIT, or are you an administrative assistant who supports teaching faculty? Do you want to learn more about course reserves and their copyright policies?

The MIT Libraries can help you navigate reserves services for print and electronic materials, and we will provide an overview of fair use and copyright guidelines for course reserves. We will also cover the details about submitting required textbook information via the Semester Book Submission Form.

Please register for this session.

What we did on your summer vacation!

Posted August 30th, 2013 by Heather Denny

Welcome back! The MIT Libraries have been working hard during your summer vacation.  Here are some of the new things you can look forward to this fall:WhatWeDidgraphic

New Resources

  • New search tool  Finding library resources just got easier with BartonPlus. It brings together many library collections in one search interface–searching most MIT-licensed e-resources like e-books and full-text articles, as well as collections in the classic Barton catalog like books, theses, music, DVDs, and more. 
  • More options for borrowing  Borrow Direct, a partnership that allows library materials to be shared between member institutions, has expanded to include the University of Chicago. MIT users can search over 50 million volumes owned by Borrow Direct libraries through MIT’s WorldCat.
  • New guide to APIs for scholarly resources  Many scholarly publishers, databases, and products offer APIs to allow users with programming skills to more powerfully extract data to serve a variety of research purposes. With an API, users might create programmatic searches of a citation database, extract statistical data, or dynamically query and post blog content. Learn more in the APIs for Scholarly Resources guide.
  • Music Oral History Project  For over 100 years music has been a vibrant part of MIT’s culture. A new website features in-depth interviews with faculty, staff, and former students about their musical experiences at the Institute, as well as their professional careers in music or other fields.

Improved study spaces

  • Upgrades to Hayden Library  The window bays in Hayden have gotten a facelift! The windows have been cleaned, frames painted, and new shades have replaced the curtains. Also check out the  new artwork by Dennis Oppenheim that adorns the first floor wall. Additionally, a number of tables and study carrels in Hayden were refinished this summer. Coming up – we hope to reupholster some of the comfy seating on the 1st floor.

Upcoming events

  • Music & Theater Arts Composer Forums  During the fall term the Lewis Music Library will host MTA Composer Forums. Stop by the library at 5pm on Oct. 9, Oct. 23, Nov. 6, Nov. 20 to hear from featured musicians.
  •  Fall workshops Throughout the month of October the Libraries will offer a series of workshops on subject-specific resources. See the event calendar for details.

Be sure to follow us on Twitter and Facebook for all the latest news!

 

Check out the complete listing of JulyAP 2013 sessions

Posted June 18th, 2013 by Mark Szarko

Unless indicated otherwise, all sessions take place in the Digital Instruction Resource Center (DIRC), 14N-132.

photo by L.Barry Hetherington

Pre-registration is required for some, but not all sessions. See below for details.

Patent Searching Fundamentals – Register
Wed July 10, 1:00 – 2:00 pm, 14N-132
Contact: Howard Silver, hsilver@mit.edu

You won’t come out of this session qualified to be a patent attorney, but you will be able to successfully find patent references from all over the world and know how to obtain patent text and diagrams. The session will be a hands-on practicum that will help de-mystify the patent literature and expose attendees to key resources for finding patents.

Please register for this session.

Take Charge of Your Stuff: Personal Content Management Tools – Register
Mon July 15, 12:00 – 1:00 pm, 14N-132
Contact: Peter Cohn, pcohn@mit.edu

Personal content management tools help you get organized so you can work more efficiently and save yourself time. Some tools help you organize all sorts of information (notes, pdfs, documents, etc.) and work more efficiently. Others let you annotate, cite, and/or share your content. In this session we’ll show you tools for doing this while working solo or in a group.

Please register for this session.

Research Data Management: File Organization – Register
Mon July 15, 2:00 – 3:00 pm, 14N-132
Contact: Katherine McNeill, mcneillh@mit.edu

Do you struggle with organizing your research data? Wonder if there’s a better way to arrange and name your data files to optimize your work? This workshop will teach you practical techniques for organizing your data files. Topics will include: file and folder organizational structures and file naming. Will include hands-on exercises to apply the concepts to your particular data project.

Please register for this session.

Introduction to GIS – Register
Tue July 16, 1:00 – 4:00 pm, 14N-132
Contact: Jennie Murack, murack@mit.edu

Learn the basics of visualizing and analyzing geographic information and creating your own maps in a Geographic Information System (GIS). We will introduce open source and proprietary GIS software options and let attendees choose to work through exercises using ESRI ArcGIS (proprietary) and/or Quantum GIS (QGIS) (open source). Learn to work with data from the MIT Geodata Repository, analyze the data, and create maps that can be used in reports and presentations.

Please register for this session.

Digitization @MIT Libraries – Register
Wed July 17, 1:00 – 2:00 pm, 14N-132
Contact: Andrew Haggarty, ahaggart@mit.edu

Boxes of dusty photos and slides? Old records sitting in the basement? Tax forms piling up in desk drawers? Take a tour through some of the digitization options available to the MIT community on campus through MIT Libraries, learn how to safely (and cheaply) digitize your items, and what steps you can take for long-term preservation.

Please register for this session.

Managing Your References: Overview of EndNote, Zotero and Mendeley – Register
Wed July 17, 4:00 – 5:00 pm, 14N-132
Contact: Peter Cohn, pcohn@mit.edu

Using citation management software to create and maintain a collection of references or PDFs is becoming more common and important in today’s academic world. These software packages (EndNote, Zotero, & Mendeley) allow users to search databases, retrieve relevant citations, and build a bibliography to be added to a paper or thesis or stored for future reference. We’ll take a look at these 3 tools.

Please register for this session.

Managing Confidential Data – Register
Thu July 18, 9:00 – 3:00, 56-114
Contact: Randi Shapiro, shapiror@mit.edu

This tutorial provides a framework for identifying and managing confidential information in research. It is most appropriate for mid-late career graduate students, faculty, and professional research staff who actively engage in the design/planning of research. The course will provide an overview of the major legal requirements governing confidential research data; and the core technological measures used to safeguard data. And it will provide an introduction to the statistical methods and software tools used to analyze and limit disclosure risks.

Failures of confidentiality threaten research integrity, reputation, legality, and funding. Every researcher in the social, behavioral and health sciences must understand how to manage confidential information in research. Successful management of confidential information is particularly challenging because it requires satisfying a combination of complex legal, statistical and technological constants. And the management of this information has grown increasingly challenging because of recent changes in the law, new forms of data collection, and advances in statistical methods for linking data.

The course will be presented in a half-day format, followed by an individualized consulting session focused on each attendee’s research project.

Please register for this class.

GIS Level 2 – Register
Thu July 18, 1:00 – 4:00 pm, 14N-132
Contact: Jennie Murack, murack@mit.edu

Expand your experience with GIS software and learn how to create and edit GIS files, geocode addresses onto a map, re-project data, and use tools like Clip, Buffer, and Spatial Join.

Prerequisite: Basic knowledge of ArcGIS (such as taking the Intro to GIS workshop)

Please register for this session.

Commercialize Your Science and Engineering Research Register
Fri July 19, 1:00 – 2:00 pm, 14N-132
Contact: Howard Silver, hsilver@mit.edu

This session will introduce scientists and engineers to business information resources that will help you understand the commercial potential for your ideas, how to find partners, and sources for financial support. We will use realistic examples and hands-on exercises with key resources to demonstrate how to match your ideas and discoveries with the opportunities and realities of the marketplace.

Please register for this session.

EndNote Basics
Wed July 31, 12:00 – 1:00 pm, 14N-132
Contact: Anita Perkins, perkins@mit.edu

EndNote is a “personal bibliographic software” package which allows you to create and manage a database of bibliographic references. Learn how to find and use information more effectively in our hands-on workshop.

Check out the complete listing of IAPril 2013 sessions

Posted March 20th, 2013 by Mark Szarko

All sessions take place in the Digital Instruction Resource Center (DIRC), 14N-132.

photo by L.Barry Hetherington

Pre-registration is required for some, but not all sessions. See below for details.

Course Reserves at the MIT Libraries – Register
Thu April 11, 10:00 – 11:00 am, 14N-132
Contact: Molly McInerney, mcinerne@mit.edu

Are you a new instructor or teaching assistant at MIT, or are you an administrative assistant who supports teaching faculty? Do you want to learn more about course reserves and their copyright policies?

The MIT Libraries can help you navigate reserves services for print and electronic materials, and we will provide an overview of fair use and copyright guidelines for course reserves. We will also cover the details about submitting required textbook information via the Semester Book Submission Form. Course reserves staff from around the MIT Libraries will be available to answer questions.

Please register for this session.

Patent Searching FundamentalsRegister
Thu April 11, 12:00 – 1:00 pm, 14N-132
Contact: Howard Silver, hsilver@mit.edu

You won’t come out of this session qualified to be a patent attorney, but you will be able to successfully find patent references from all over the world and know how to obtain patent text and diagrams. The session will be a hands-on practicum that will help de-mystify the patent literature and expose attendees to key resources for finding patents.

Please register for this session.

EndNote BasicsRegister
Wed April 17, 12:00 – 1:00 pm, 14N-132
Contact: Peter Cohn, pcohn@mit.edu

EndNote is a “personal bibliographic software” package which allows you to create and manage a database of bibliographic references. Learn how to find and use information more effectively in our hands-on workshop.

Please register for this session.

Commercialize Your Science and Engineering ResearchRegister
Tue April 23, 1:00 – 2:00 pm, 14N-132
Contact: Howard Silver, hsilver@mit.edu

This session will introduce scientists and engineers to business information resources that will help you understand the commercial potential for your ideas, how to find partners, and sources for financial support. We will use realistic examples and hands-on exercises with key resources to demonstrate how to match your ideas and discoveries with the opportunities and realities of the marketplace.

Please register for this session.

The Information Is Out There…But Can You Find It? The Information Landscape in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
Thu April 25, 12:00 – 1:00 pm, 14N-132
Contact: Amy Stout, astout@mit.edu

The class is open to all, but targeted at first-year EECS graduate students. It will cover:

  • The information landscape of EECS
  • Tools to make your work more efficient
  • Library services that you may not know about
  • How to find help when you need it

Manage Your References: Overview of EndNote, RefWorks, Mendeley, & ZoteroRegister
Thu April 25, 5:00 – 6:15 pm, 14N-132
Contact: Peter Cohn, pcohn@mit.edu

Using citation management software to create and maintain a collection of references or PDFs is becoming more common and important in today’s academic world. These software packages (EndNote, RefWorks, Zotero, & Mendeley) allow users to search databases, retrieve relevant citations, and build a bibliography to be added to a paper or thesis or stored for future reference. We’ll take a look at these 4 tools.

Please register for this session.

Collect Your Own Data with a GPSRegister
Tue April 30, 2:00 – 4:00 pm, 14N-132
Contact Person: Jennie Murack, murack@mit.edu

Will you be doing data collection over the summer or perhaps just some hiking? This workshop will teach you how to use a handheld GPS to collect geographic data and then download it into ArcMap software for analysis. We will go outside and collect points and routes and then go inside to view our data. GPS units are available to checkout from Rotch Library for use after the workshop.

Please register for this session.

Personal Content Management Tools – Register
Wed May 1, 12:00 – 1:00, 14N-132 (originally scheduled for 4/24, 12-1)
Contact: Peter Cohn, pcohn@mit.edu

Personal content management tools help you get organized so you can work more efficiently and save time. Some tools help you organize all sorts of information (notes, pdfs, documents, images etc. etc.) and work more efficiently. Others let you annotate, cite, and/or share your content. In this session we’ll show you tools for doing this while working solo or in a group.

Please register for this session.

H4ckademic jam session: tips & tricks for working on mobile tablets

Posted January 24th, 2013 by Remlee Green

mobile tabletsDo you own an iPad, Surface, Android tablet, or other mobile tablet and use it for your work at MIT?  Join us for free dinner & share your tips & work-arounds for working on your device!

h4ckademic jam session: best apps for managing your academic workflows
Thursday, January 31, 4-7pm
14N-132
Bring a mobile tablet.

h4ckademic, a project of the Harvard Library Lab, is exploring & developing academic workflows using apps on mobile tablets. You’re invited to join a jam session at MIT!

A h4ckademic jam session is a blend of many things–part app-athon, part design squad, part discovery zone–but essentially it’s hanging out to riff on mutual app experiences to create something new & cool.  So that’s the idea–bring together students who use tablets and develop cool workflows using apps to get their academic stuff done. Anything from capturing, collecting & organizing electronic academic content to reading, annotating & note-taking.

These jam sessions will surface the best of the best in academic workflows & will contribute to a baseline of options that will be showcased in an online app gallery. The online app gallery will be a tool for new students, new mobile users or anyone who wants to expand their app use to see apps that are being used, how they are being used & what might work best for them.

What will you do at the jam session?

  • Meet other tablet users
  • See folks demo their academic workflows on their mobile tablets
  • Break out in design squads to define, refine, & demo a workflow for inclusion in the online gallery
  • Contribute to a tool that will help students across campus
  • Eat (yep, dinner’s provided!)
  • Have fun!

Sign up & learn more.

Can’t make the session, but want to share your h4ck? Use the form to give us a list of the apps you use to manage your academic workflow.

Questions? Contact Carol Kentner, 617-496-4799, carol_kentner@gse.harvard.edu

Advance sign-up required.