Author readings

authors@mit presents: David Mindell, Thursday, November 13

Posted November 12th, 2008 by mit-admin

digital-apollo.jpg

Please join authors@mit and the Humanities Library in celebrating the publication of Digital Apollo, the newest book by MIT’s David Mindell. “Digital Apollo” tells the story of how human pilots and automated systems worked together to achieve the ultimate in flight—the lunar landings of NASA’s Apollo program.

“Digital Apollo is an excellent and unique historical account of the lengthy and often pitched struggle of designers, engineers, and pilots to successfully integrate man and complex computer systems for the Apollo lunar landings. It brings back fond memories.”
—Edgar Mitchell, Sc.D.; Captain, USN (retired) Lunar Module Pilot, Apollo 14

About the book:
As Apollo 11′s Lunar Module descended toward the moon under automatic control, a program alarm in the guidance computer’s software nearly caused a mission abort. Neil Armstrong responded by switching off the automatic mode and taking direct control. He stopped monitoring the computer and began flying the spacecraft, relying on skill to land it and earning praise for a triumph of human over machine.

In “Digital Apollo”, engineer-historian David Mindell takes this famous moment as a starting point for an exploration of the relationship between humans and computers in the Apollo program. In each of the six Apollo landings, the astronaut in command seized control from the computer and landed with his hand on the stick. Mindell recounts the story of astronauts’ desire to control their spacecraft in parallel with the history of the Apollo Guidance Computer. From the early days of aviation through the birth of spaceflight, test pilots and astronauts sought to be more than “spam in a can” despite the automatic controls, digital computers, and software developed by engineers. Digital Apollo examines the design and execution of each of the six Apollo moon landings, drawing on transcripts and data telemetry from the flights, astronaut interviews, and NASA’s extensive archives.

Mindell’s exploration of how human pilots and automated systems worked together to achieve the ultimate in flight–a lunar landing–traces and reframes the debate over the future of humans and automation in space. The results have implications for any venture in which human roles seem threatened by automated systems, whether it is the work at our desktops or the future of exploration.

“Digital Apollo” is published by the MIT Press, 2008.

Visit the Digital Apollo website for more information about the book!

David A. Mindell is Dibner Professor of the History of Engineering and Manufacturing, Professor of Engineering Systems, and Director of the Program in Science, Technology, and Society at MIT. He is the author of “Between Human and Machine: Feedback, Control, and Computing before Cybernetics” and “War, Technology, and Experience aboard the USS Monitor.”

Where: MIT 32-155, Stata Center

When: Thursday November 13th, 6:00pm

The event is free and wheelchair accessible.

For more information, call call 253-5249, or email authors@mit.edu. See the MIT Press Bookstore’s “Events” page for a list of upcoming events.

authors@mit presents: Sherry Turkle, Thursday, November 6

Posted November 5th, 2008 by mit-admin

turkle-225.jpg

Please join authors@mit and the Humanities Library in welcoming Sherry Turkle as she introduces her newest book, “The Inner History of Devices”

In this volume, the third in a trilogy, Turkle combines memoir, clinical writings, and ethnography to draw new perspectives on the experience of technology. Her  personal stories illuminate how technology enters the inner life.

“What a remarkable book—as if it were a magic toolbox, out of this volume come objects with stories: cell phones, dialysis machines, defibrillators, websites, and much more. Using fieldwork, clinical
work, and memory work, Sherry Turkle and her terrific contributors make the material world a place of living meanings that tell a great deal about who we are—and who we are becoming. Even more: this is a
sophisticated book that is great fun to read.” —Peter Galison, Joseph Pellegrino University Professor, Harvard University

“The Inner History of Devices” is published by The MIT Press.

Sherry Turkle is Abby Rockefeller Mauze Professor of the Social Studies of Science and Technology at MIT. Her previous books include “Falling for Science: Objects in Mind”, and “Evocative Objects: Things We Think With.”

Where: MIT 35-225, Sloan Laboratory Building

When: Thursday November 6th, 6:00pm

The event is free and wheelchair accessible.

For more information, call call 253-5249, or email authors@mit.edu. See the MIT Press Bookstore’s “Events” page for a list of upcoming events.

authors@mit event at The Humanities Library Wed. 9/24

Posted September 23rd, 2008 by Marion Leeds Carroll

Please join us at The MIT Humanities Library as MIT’s Christopher Capozzola introduces his new book.

“Uncle Sam Wants You” tells the gripping story of the American homefront in World War I, revealing how the tensions of mass mobilization led to a significant increase in power in Washington, and made wartime America the scene of some of the nation’s most serious political violence.

“Uncle Sam Wants You” is published by Oxford University Press.

Christopher Capozzola is an Associate Professor of History at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

This event is sponsored by authors@mit, a lecture series cosponsored by MIT Libraries and The MIT Press Bookstore.

Where: The MIT Humanities Library Reading Room (14S-200)

When: Wednesday September 24th, 5:30pm

The event is free and wheelchair accessible.

For more information, call call 253-5249, or email authors@mit.edu. See the MIT Press Bookstore’s “Events” page for a list of upcoming events.

Professor Irving Singer Lecture Now Available on MIT World

Posted April 4th, 2008 by Heather Denny

bergman-225.jpgOn Thursday, November 15th the MIT Humanities Library hosted Professor Irving Singer who spoke about his new book, Ingmar Bergman, Cinematic Philosopher, just published by The MIT Press. A video of the event is now available on MIT World.

In this lecture, Singer discusses how Bergman used philosophical ideas “in an extended sense” — not by including philosophical discussions in his films, but through his masterful use of cinematic technique to examine the particularities of human experience. Singer also describes how Bergman wove aspects of his own life’s story into his films, in intense and vivid ways.

Irving Singer is Professor of Philosophy at MIT. He is the author of Reality Transformed: Film as Meaning and Technique, Three Philosophical Filmmakers: Hitchcock, Welles, Renoir (both published by The MIT Press), and many other books.

This event was sponsored by authors@mit. For more information, call call 253-5249, or email authors@mit.edu. See the MIT Press Bookstore’s “Events” page for a list of upcoming events.

IAP Book Discussion: The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao by Junot Diaz, Thursday January 24th

Posted January 9th, 2008 by mit-admin

junot-diaz.jpg

Join The Humanities Library for a discussion of the book that has literary circles buzzing. The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao, by Associate Professor in Writing and Humanistic Studies Junot Díaz, has been included on several year-end “best of” lists for fiction published in 2007. The discussion will be moderated by librarian Mark Szarko.

  • When: Thursday January 24, 11am-12:00pm
  • Where: 14N-417
  • Cost: Free
  • Contact: Mark Szarko (617-258-8022, szarko@mit.edu) to register, and for further details

The first 8 registrants will receive a free copy of the novel!

Irving Singer speaks on Ingmar Bergman – Thursday Nov. 15th, 6pm

Posted November 7th, 2007 by mit-admin

bergman-225.jpg

Please join authors@mit in welcoming Professor Irving Singer, as he speaks on his new book, Ingmar Bergman, Cinematic Philosopher, just published by The MIT Press.

Known for their repeating motifs and signature tropes, the films of Ingmar Bergman also contain extensive variation and development. In these reflections on Bergman’s artistry and thought, Irving Singer discerns distinctive themes in Bergman’s filmmaking, from first intimations in the early work to consummate resolutions in the later movies. Singer demonstrates that while Bergman’s output was not philosophy on celluloid, it attains an expressive and purely aesthetic truthfulness that can be considered philosophical in a broader sense.  

Irving Singer is Professor of Philosophy at MIT. He is the author of Reality Transformed: Film as Meaning and TechniqueThree Philosophical Filmmakers: Hitchcock, Welles, Renoir (both published by The MIT Press), and many other books. 

Where: The MIT Humanities Library Reading Room (14S-200)

When: Thursday November 15th, 6:00pm

The event is free and wheelchair accessible. 

For more information, call call 253-5249, or email authors@mit.edu.  See the MIT Press Bookstore’s “Events” page for a list of upcoming events.

Former MIT staffer Robin Lippincott reads from his new book

Posted October 16th, 2007 by mit-admin

in-the-meantime-72.jpg

 

Please join authors@mit in welcoming former MIT staffer Robin Lippincott back to MIT, as he reads from his 3rd novel, In the Meantime, just published by Toby press

Where:  The MIT Humanities Library Reading Room (14S-200)

When:  Tuesday October 16th, 6:00pm 

See the MIT Press Bookstore’s “Events” page for further details. 

Reminder: Bill Mitchell speaks tonight!!!

Posted April 25th, 2007 by mit-admin
Professor William J. Mitchell and Imaginig MIT

Please join us as Professor William J. Mitchell presents his newest book. Imagining MIT is the image rich story of the decade long, billion-dollar building boom at MIT and how it produced major works of architecture by Charles Correa, Frank Gehry, Steven Holl, Fumihiko Maki, and Kevin Roche.

Professor Mitchell is the Alexander W. Dreyfoos Professor of Architecture and Media Arts and Sciences and directs the Smart Cities research group at MIT’s Media Lab.

Imagining MIT is published by The MIT Press, 2007.
This event is free and wheelchair accessible.

 

Bill Mitchell speaks about his new book IMAGINING MIT!

Posted April 18th, 2007 by mit-admin
Professor William J. Mitchell and Imagining MIT Please join us as Professor William J. Mitchell presents his newest book. Imagining MIT is the image rich story of the decade long, billion-dollar building boom at MIT and how it produced major works of architecture by Charles Correa, Frank Gehry, Steven Holl, Fumihiko Maki, and Kevin Roche.

Professor Mitchell is the Alexander W. Dreyfoos Professor of Architecture and Media Arts and Sciences and directs the Smart Cities research group at MIT’s Media Lab.

Imagining MIT is published by The MIT Press, 2007.
This event is free and wheelchair accessible.

Book reading and discussion at Humanities Library

Posted March 29th, 2007 by mit-admin

Hansjörg Schertenleib, Writer-in-Residence at MIT, author of numerous novels, poetry, film scripts, drama, and radio plays, will be reading from his latest novel from 2005, Der Glückliche (The Happy One).

Born in 1957 in Zurich Switzerland, Schertenleib’s works have been translated into seven languages. He was trained as a typesetter and a graphic designer, and educated at the School of Arts in Zurich. He was co-editor of the literary magazine Orte from 1980 to 1984. He has lived in Vienna and London, and currently lives in County Donegal in Ireland.

The reading and discussion will be in German and English. Light refreshments will be served.

  • When: Tuesday April 3, 2007
    5-7pm
  • Where: MIT Humanities Library
  • Cost: FREE!!!
  • Presented by: MIT Foreign Language and Literatures, The Max-Kade Foundation New York, S.H.A.R.E., and CB/BS
  • See the record in Barton

Video available of Diana Henderson author reading

Posted December 12th, 2006 by Nicole Hennig

A video is now available of a recent authors@mit event. Diana Henderson discusses her book, Collaborations with the Past. For more info on this event see authors@mit presents Diana Henderson.

Download the video. (1 hour, 38 minutes) (606.4 Mb)

Authors@mit event from 2005 available for downloading: William Mitchell, Placing Words

Posted December 12th, 2006 by Nicole Hennig

The recording of a previous authors@mit event is now available for downloading.

Placing Words: symbols, space, and the city: William Mitchell, 2005.

Download mp3. (1 hour, 11 minutes) (32.8 Mb)

For more information on this event, see authors@mit presents William Mitchell. To watch a video of this event, see the MIT World page. (streaming video)

authors@mit presents Diana Henderson on 11/14 (Tuesday), 5:30 pm

Posted November 9th, 2006 by Jim Eggleston
Please join us as MIT’s Diana Henderson discusses her new book,
“Collaborations with the Past.” By concentrating on rich yet problematic
instances of Shakespeare’s reanimation in such quintessentially modern forms
as the novel and film, from Sir Walter Scott’s “Kenilworth” to Kenneth
Branagh’s “Henry V”, Diana Henderson sketches a complex history of the
pleasures and difficulties that ensue when Shakespeare and modern artists
collaborate.

Location: MIT 32-155, Stata Center, 32 Vassar Street, Cambridge

Time: November 14 (Tuesday), 5:30 pm

This event is free and wheelchair accessible.

Diana Henderson’s Collaborations with the past

Cornell University Press, 2006

Diana E. Henderson is Professor of Literature at MIT. She is the author of
“Passion Made Public: Elizabethan Lyric, Gender, and Performance” and the
editor of “A Concise Companion to Shakespeare on Screen.”

This event is sponsored by authors@mit, a lecture series cosponsored by MIT
Libraries
and The MIT Press Bookstore.

For more information call 253-5249, email authors@mit.edu, or check:
http://web.mit.edu/bookstore/www/events/

An evening with Chris Abani: Monday, Sept. 18

Posted September 12th, 2006 by Christie Moore

Nigerian writer and activist Chris Abani will visit MIT as an artist-in-residence Sept. 18-22. The Lewis Music Library will host an evening in which the author will read from his poetry and fiction as well as play his saxophone. The event will take place from 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm on Monday.

Read about Abani in the press release from the MIT Office of the Arts.

The Lewis Music Library is located in Bldg. 14E-109 and the event is free and open to the public.

authors@mit presents William J. Mitchell on 12/6 (Tuesday), 5:30 pm

Posted December 5th, 2005 by Jim Eggleston

authors@mit presents

William J. Mitchell speaking on his newest book, “Placing Words” (MIT Press, 2005).
Mitchell_Placing

The meaning of a message, says William Mitchell, depends on the context of its reception. “Shouting ‘fire’ in a crowded theater produces a dramatically different effect from barking the same word to a squad of soldiers with guns,” he observes. In his new book, Professor Mitchell looks at the ways in which urban spaces and places provide settings for communication and at how they conduct complex flows of information through the twenty-first century city.

Location: MIT E15, Bartos Theater, 20 Ames Street, Cambridge
Time: December 6 (Tuesday), 5:30 pm

For more information, please see: MIT Press Bookstore Events

Co-sponsored by the MIT Libraries and the MIT Press.

authors@mit presents Yossi Sheffi on 11/1 (Tuesday), 6pm

Posted November 1st, 2005 by Darcy Duke

authors@mit presents:

Yossi Sheffi, author of “The Resilient Enterprise”

Resilient Enterprise book jacket

Please join us as MIT Professor and international expert in supply chain management Yossi Sheffi shows us how companies can reduce their vulnerability to high-impact disruptions – the topic explored in his book The Resilient Enterprise (The MIT Press, 2005).

Location: MIT 32-141, Stata Center, 32 Vassar Street, Cambridge
Time: November 1 (Tuesday), 6pm

For more information, please see: MIT Press Bookstore Events

Co-sponsored by the MIT Libraries and the MIT Press.