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Lewis Music Library

WHAT'S THE SCORE?
Fall 2001
Newsletter of the Lewis Music Library,
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Lewis Music Library
Building 14E-109
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Cambridge, MA 02139-4307
(617) 253-5689
(617) 253-3109 FAX
http://libraries.mit.edu/
music

STAFF

Forrest Larson
Circulation & Reserves Asst.
(617) 253-0982
twiggy@mit.edu

Christina Moore
Collections & Processing
Asst. (617) 253-3974
csmoore@mit.edu

Peter Munstedt
Music Librarian
(617) 253-5636
pmunsted@mit.edu

CONTENTS

Roger Reynolds Page 1
Violin Music Donation Page 1
Updated Website Page 2
New Catalog Page 2
BELL Page 2
NEMLA Meeting Page 2
Tours Page 2
Donations Page 3
MIT Groups' CDs Page 3
Bad Jokes Page 3

 

ROGER REYNOLDS
VISITS MIT

Composer Roger Reynolds visited MIT on April 26th-27th. Mr. Reynolds is an internationally acclaimed composer who has been widely performed and published. In 1989, he won a Pulitzer Prize for Whispers Out of Time, for string orchestra. His visit, sponsored by a grant from MIT's Council for the Arts and support from the Music and Theater Arts Section, resulted from a cooperative collecting project involving the Boston Library Consortium (BLC). In the fall of 1999, the Lewis Music Library agreed to collect the printed music of three important contemporary composers: Libby Larsen, Roger Reynolds, and Osvaldo Golijov. Several BLC libraries agreed to purchase the music of other contemporary composers. Ms. Larsen visited the library last year and Mr. Golijov may be invited in 2002.

Roger Reynolds' visit included a visit to the Media Lab, where he spoke and his music was performed. He toured the Lewis Music Library, and he met with Peter Munstedt to discuss the library's future acquisition of his music scores. Mr. Reynolds also met individually with

 

students to discuss their musical compositions. Thanks to John Harbison for his assistance in making this informative visit possible.

VIOLIN MUSIC DONATION

The Lewis Music Library received a major donation containing 2,680 pieces of violin music from Lois Craig, former Associate Dean of MIT's School of Architecture and Planning. Her late husband Stephen Prokopoff, who was a museum director as well as a fine violinist, assembled this extensive collection from various countries over many years. Included in the collection are compositions and rare editions that will be new to our holdings. The collection includes music from the 18th century on, with a special emphasis on 20th-century music.

Marcus Thompson, Professor of Music and Director of the MIT Chamber Music Society, called the collection "potentially one of the most significant in the Boston area. Once inventoried and cataloged, this will be a valuable resource for teachers, recitalists, historians and
(continued on pg. 3 - Violin Music)

NEW MIT LIBRARIES WEBSITE

This summer, the MIT Libraries created a new website at http://libraries.mit.edu. In addition to the revised look, this site is organized to provide easy access to a wealth of materials. One new feature is the Libraries' digital reference service, called "Ask Us! - Live," in which MIT students, faculty, and staff can ask reference questions of a librarian interactively online. At present, this service has limited hours. The e-mail version of Ask Us! provides an answer by e-mail within 24 hours during weekdays. Of course, phone calls are still welcome!

NEW LIBRARY CATALOG

This summer, the MIT Libraries launched a new computer operating system using Ex Libris library software. The system's components include cataloging, acquisitions, circulation, reserves, and the public catalog (Barton). Library users now have a new and improved online catalog that offers several features unavailable on the previous system. Information and training sessions on Barton are being held this fall. Other Boston-area libraries are also using Ex Libris software, including Boston College and Brandeis University. Harvard University is scheduled to begin their new system with Ex Libris next year.

If anyone would like instruction on the new Barton, please call the library and set up an appointment (617-253-5636).

Page 2

BELL: BURIED E-JOURNAL LOCATOR LIST

The MIT Libraries subscribe to several information services that include hundreds of journals in electronic full-text versions; they are listed on VERA (Virtual Electronic Resource Access) Unfortunately, there has been no central listing of these journal titles. Now that has changed. The Libraries have just introduced BELL (Buried E-Journal Locator List), a listing of all the electronic journals available to MIT through the various subscription services listed on VERA. You may be surprised at the number of music titles included. We have found recent years of journals such as American Music, Current Musicology, Early Music, Ethnomusicology, Music & Letters, Perspectives of New Music, and more, including some titles that we do not receive in hard copy. This service allows users to enjoy the convenience of viewing articles from their home or office.

Because the MIT Libraries pay for many of these databases and e-journals, access is restricted to MIT faculty, students, and staff. Computers connected within the campus can view all of these services without the need for certificates. However, if MIT personnel would like to see these databases and e-journals from outside MIT, they will need to obtain MIT certificates.

Certificates can be obtained with an MIT identification number and username from the MIT Information Systems Site

 

 

TOURS AND INSTRUCTION

PLEASE CONTACT PETER MUNSTEDT IF YOU WOULD LIKE A TOUR OF THE LIBRARY. TOURS CAN BE GIVEN AS PART OF MUSIC CLASSES OR TO ANY INDIVIDUALS INTERESTED IN LEARNING ABOUT OUR COLLECTIONS AND FACILITIES. TOURS WILL BE TAILORED TO MEET YOUR REQUIREMENTS AND CAN LAST FROM FIVE MINUTES TO AN HOUR. INSTRUCTION ON SEARCHING BARTON CAN ALSO BE PROVIDED. PLEASE ASK!

NEW ENGLAND MLA MEETING

The Lewis Music Library hosted the New England Chapter of the Music Library Association (NEMLA) on May 18th, 2001. Over 50 music librarians and staff from throughout New England attended. The meeting opened not with speeches, but with a wonderful performance of a Taneyev string quintet movement by MIT Chamber Music Society students of Marcus Thompson's. Don Byrd (Univ. of Mass.) and Paul Corneilson (Packard Humanities Foundation) then delivered talks on "Music Information Retrieval" and "The C.P.E. Bach Edition and the Future of Scholarly Editions," respectively.

There was also a tour of the Lewis Music Library and lunch at the Faculty Club where William Cutter and members of the MIT Chamber Chorus performed two Monteverdi madrigals, which whetted everyone's musical appetite. The afternoon session included a lively panel discussion, "Why Music at MIT?" led by (continued on pg. 3 - NEMLA)

DONATIONS
(4/01 TO 9/01)

The Lewis Music Library is grateful for the generosity of our donors:

Donations:
Dr. Giselle G. Hamad, Mr. G. Hasha and Mrs. S. Langsdorf, Dr. Bonnie Van Der Pers, and Ms. Stephanie Wingfield.

Gifts in kind:
Seth Bisen-Hersh, Lois Craig
(see article on p.1), William Cutter, Nolina Gauthier, Dr. and Mrs. Morton Grosser, the Jarvis Conservatory, Esther Kim, Larissa Kushkuley, Forrest Larson, Lowell Lindgren, Rajesh Mehta, MITHAS (MIT Heritage of the Arts of South Asia), the MIT Office of the Arts, the MIT Muses, the MIT Wind Ensemble, Music and Theater Arts, Patricia Tang, and Evan Ziporyn.

- Many Thanks! -

If we have inadvertently omitted your name from this list, please contact us!

VIOLIN MUSIC
(continued from pg.1)

collectors alike. That value can only grow as artists explore the depths and bring to the surface, through live performances and recordings, the jewels they find."

The library will begin to process this music so that it can be cataloged and made available to our library users. The bulk of the collection contains music that will circulate, but several early and rare editions will be housed in the library's Erdmann Special Collections Room.

CDs FROM MIT STUDENT VOCAL GROUPS

The Lewis Music Library recently acquired CDs from many of MIT's student performing groups. Several of these recordings were generously donated by the groups or by individual members. MIT Cross Products, MITCAN (MIT African Music and Dance Ensemble), and the MIT/ Wellesley Toons are now
Muses' CD cover Cover for the Muses' CD, Elysian Fields
represented in our collection for the first time, and we have added more recordings by the Logarhythms, the Muses, and the Chorallaries. Many thanks to those groups for making their CDs available to our users!

NEMLA
(continued from pg.2)

former Music Librarian Nina Davis-Millis with music professors Lowell Lindgren, Marcus Thompson, and Evan Ziporyn.

Forrest Larson of the Lewis Music Library delivered a speech on the Music at MIT Oral History project and played excerpts from that collection. The meeting concluded with a spirited rendering of sheet music songs from the Lewis Music Library's Inventions of Note Collection performed by MIT Music and Theater Arts faculty members William Cutter, Kyle Hoepner, Margaret O'Keefe, Michael Ouellette, Charles Shadle (piano) and Pamela Wood.

BAD JOKES - MUSICAL DEFINITIONS

- From various online sources

Blues: Played exclusively by people who woke up this morning.

Vibrato: Technique used by singers to hide the fact that they are on the wrong pitch.

Opera: People singing when they should be talking.

Rap: People talking when they should be singing.

Lamentoso: With handkerchiefs.

Big Band: 20 men who take turns standing up, plus a drummer

Metronome: A dwarf who lives in the city.

House Music: OK, as long as it’s not the house next door.

Discord: Not to be confused with datcord.

Crescendo: A clue to the performer that he must be playing too loudly.

Flat: This is what happens to a tonic if it sits too long in the open air.

Special thanks to student assistant Tina M. Salmon, ‘02 for her work on the layout and editing of “What’s the Score?