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Oral History Holdings at MIT

Oral History Holdings Not at MIT


Rules for use of oral histories will vary depending upon their origins. Contact the appropriate holder at either the MIT Institute Archives and Special Collections or the MIT Museum for specific information.

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Oral Histories at MIT (A-M)

N

Neidhardt, Frederick
MC 100
Recombinant DNA History Collection

(1931 - )  Neidhardt received a BA from Kenyon College in 1952 and a PhD from Harvard University in 1956.  From 1961 to 1970, he served on the faculty of Purdue University before moving to the University of Michigan.  There he served as chairman of the department of microbiology and immunology from 1970 to 1982 and as vice president for research from 1998 to the present.  In 1989, he became a Novy Distinguished University Professor.  His research currently focuses on microbiology and the molecular physiology of the bacterium Escherichia coli.  (The Complete Marquis Who's Who. Marquis Who's Who, 1999;  http://www-personal.umich.edu/~fcneid/index.html#face.)

Neumann, Lance
MC 130
MIT-California Division of Highways Project Oral History Collection, 1975

Novick, Richard
MC 100
Recombinant DNA History Collection.

(1932 - )  Novick received a BA from Yale University in 1954 and an MD from New York University in 1959.  In 1965, Novick joined the Public Health Research Institute of New York City where he served as chairman of the Department of Biology from 1975 to 1981.  Currently, Novick is an investigator at the Skirball Institute of Bimolecular Medicine at the NYU Medical Center and a professor of microbiology and medicine at the NYU medical school.  (The Complete Marquis Who's Who. Marquis Who's Who, 1999; http://mcrcr4.med.nyu.edu/people/R.Novick.html.)

O

Oakley, Gilbert
77-110
Physical Science Study Committee Oral History Collection, 1956-1976


Overberger, Charles
MC 100
Recombinant DNA History Collection

(1921? – 1997)  Overberg was a member of the American Chemical Society, the chemistry section of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the Macromolecular Division of the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry.  In 1967, he joined the faculty of the University of Michigan as as a professor and chairman of the chemistry department.  There he founded the Macromolecular Research Center and served as its director.  Before retiring in 1988, he was appointed professor emeritus.  In 1979, he received the International Award of the Society of Plastics Engineers and in 1982, he received the Horace N. Potts Medal from the Franklin Institute.  (http://www.pub.umich.edu/daily/1997/mar/03-20-97/news/
news12.html

P

Palay, Sanford
MC 226
Francis O. Schmitt Oral History of Neuroscience Project, 1986

(1918 - ) Palay received an AB from Oberlin College in 1940 and a MD from Case Western Reserve University in 1943. Before being appointed as Bullard Professor of Neuroanatomy at Harvard University in 1961, Palay was on the faculties at Yale University and Case Western Reserve University. In 1989, he was named professor emeritus at Harvard. From 1960 to 1961, he served as chief of the Laboratory of Neuroanatomical Science at the National Institutes of Health. Palay is a member of the National Academy of Arts and Sciences and the Royal Microscope Society. (The Complete Marquis Who's Who. Marquis Who's Who, 1999; http://www.oberlin.edu/news-info/99apr/palaygift_brainslides.html.)

Payne, Francis
MC 100
Recombinant DNA History Collection

Pecknold, Wayne
MC 130
MIT-California Division of Highways Project Oral History Collection, 1975

Peddy, Jack
MC 130
MIT-California Division of Highways Project Oral History Collection, 1975

Pederson, Thoru
MC 100
Recombinant DNA History Collection

(1941 - )  Pederson received a BS in 1963 and a PhD in zoology in 1968, both from Syracuse University.  In 1971, Pederson joined the Worcester Foundation for Experimental Biology as a staff scientist where from 1973 to 1983, he was a senior scientist and in 1985, its president and science director.  Currently, he is a professor of biochemistry and molecular biology at the University of Massachusetts Medical School.  (The Complete Marquis Who's Who. Marquis Who's Who, 1999; http://www.umassmed.edu/bmb/faculty/pederson.cfm.)

Perlis, Alan J.
MC 131
Computers at MIT Oral History Collection, 1976-1977

(1922 – 1990)  Perlis received a BS in chemistry from the Carnegie Institute of Technology in 1933 and an MS and PhD from MIT in 1950.  He joined the faculty of the Carnegie Institute of Technology in 1956, quickly becoming a professor of math, director of the computer center, and head of computer science.  In 1971, he left for Yale University where he helped to found the Computer Science Department and was Eugene Higgins Professor of Computer Science.  He served as chairman of the Department of Computer Science from 1976 to 1990.  (The Complete Marquis Who's Who. Marquis Who's Who, 1999;  http://www.cs.yale.edu/brochure/intro.html.)

Perlman, David
MC 100
Recombinant DNA History Collection

(1918 - )  Perlman received an AB in 1939 and an MS in 1940, both from Columbia University.  In 1940, he joined the San Francisco Chronicle as a reporter and served as its science editor from 1952 to 1977 and its city editor from 1977 to 1979.  In 1976, he received the AAAS Science Writing Award and in 1989, he received the Career Achievement Award of the Society of Profile Journalists.  (The Complete Marquis Who's Who. Marquis Who's Who, 1999.)

Pfund, Nancy
MC 100
Recombinant DNA History Collection

Philipson, Lennart
MC 100
Recombinant DNA History Collection

(1929 - )  Philipson received an MD from Uppsala University in 1957.  Throughout his career, he has conducted research in cellular and molecular biology in Sweden and internationally.  He joined the faculty of Uppsala University in 1957 as a research assistant.  In 1967, he founded the Wallenberg Laboratory at Uppsala and served as its first director.  The following year, he became a professor in microbiology.  From 1993 to 1997, he was director of the Skirball Institute of Bimolecular Medicine and in 1998, he joined the faculty at the Karolinska Institute as professor emeritus.  He was a visiting professor at MIT in 1977.  (The Complete Marquis Who's Who. Marquis Who's Who, 1999;  http://info.ki.se/news/media_services/press_releases/1999/
philipson_en.html
.)

Pierce, Daniel
MC 100
Recombinant DNA History Collection

(1928 - )  Pierce received an AB in 1949 and a JD in 1952, both from Harvard University.  In 1965, he was a partner in the law firm of Altheimer & Gray.  From 1965 to 1985, he was a member of the Illinois House of Representatives and also served as the chairman of the Subcommittee on DNA Research Controls of the Committee on the Environment from 1975 to 1977.  (The Complete Marquis Who's Who. Marquis Who's Who, 1999.)

Pierce, Marjorie
MC 356
MIT Alumnae Oral History Collection

(1900?-1999)  Pierce received an SB in architecture in 1922 and an SM in 1923, both from MIT.  At MIT, she served in volunteer roles for the Association of MIT Alumni and Alumnae, helped raise the endowment for the Ellen Swallow Richards Professorship, and was the president of the MIT Women’s Association from 1940 to 1944.  Pierce practiced architecture for over seventy years.  (“Architect Marjorie Pierce, oldest alumna, dies at age 99.”  Tech Talk. 12/15/99.)

Pierson, Lawrence
MC 89
Ocean Engineering Oral History Collection, 1962-1976

Ploog, Detlev
MC 226
Francis O. Schmitt Oral History of Neuroscience Project, 1986

Point, Warren
MC 133
MIT Committee on the Use of Humans as Experimental Subjects Oral History Collection, 1976

(1921 - )  Point received a BA from West Virginia University 1942 and an MD from Harvard University in 1945.  Before coming to the MIT Medical Department in 1967, Point served his residency at Boston City Hospital and conducted a private practice in internal medicine and gastroenterology at Massachusetts General Hospital.  At MIT, he served in the group of medicine and gastroenterology from 1967 to 1977.  In 1977, he left for the faculty of West Virginia University where he served as a professor and as the associate chairman of the Department of Medicine.  In 1991, he was named professor emeritus.  (The Complete Marquis Who's Who. Marquis Who's Who, 1999.)

Pollack, Robert
MC 100
Recombinant DNA History Collection

(1940 - )  Pollack received a BA from Columbia University in 1961 and a PhD from Brandeis University in 1966.  He has spent most of his career teaching, serving as an assistant professor at New York University Medical School from 1969 to 1970 and as a professor at SUNY Stony Brook from 1971 to 1975.  In 1978, he joined the faculty of Columbia University serving as the eleventh dean of Columbia College from 1982 to 1985.  As a researcher, Pollack has done studies dealing with the mechanisms by which cells become cancerous.  From 1971 to 1975, he was a senior scientist at the Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory were he worked with James Watson.  He was awarded the Alexander Hamilton Medal from Columbia College in 1989 and the Lionel Trilling Award in 1995 for his book Signs of Life: The Language and Meaning of DNA.  Currently, he is the chaiman of the Committee on Science at Columbia and a professor of biology.  (The Complete Marquis Who's Who. Marquis Who's Who, 1999; “Mirollo, Pollack Win Top Awards from Students.”  Columbia University Record.  04/07/1995.)

Ptashne, Mark
MC 100
Recombinant DNA History Collection

(1940 - )  Ptashne received a BA from Reed College in 1961 and a PhD from Harvard University in 1968.  In the same year, he joined the faculty of Harvard as a lecturer in biochemistry.  In 1971, he became a full professor and from 1993 to 1997, he was chairman of the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.  During research he conducted at Harvard with Nancy Hopkins, they discovered a protein used to activate genes in bacteria.  In the 1980s, Ptashne proved that the same mechanism worked in humans and other higher organisms.  In 1997, he received the Lasker Award for this work.  He authored A Genetic Switch in 1986 to explain gene regulation.  Currently, he is a professor of molecular biology at the Sloan Kettering Cancer Research Center.  (The Complete Marquis Who's Who. Marquis Who's Who, 1999;  Cromie, William J.  “Ptashne Wins Lasker Award.”  Harvard Gazette.  09/25/1997.)

Purcell, Edward M.
77-110
Physical Science Study Committee Oral History Collection, 1956-1976

(1912 - 1997)  Purcell received a BS from Purdue University in 1933, an AM from Harvard University in 1935, and a PhD also from Harvard in 1938.  During World War II, he was a member of the Radiation Laboratory at MIT working on advanced radar for night fighting.  He joined the faculty of Harvard University in 1946 as an assistant professor, becoming a full professor in 1949 and professor emeritus in 1980.  In 1952, he was a co-recipient of the Nobel Prize in Physics with physicist Felix Bloch for simultaneously, yet independently, developing a technique to measure the magnetic moments of atoms.  Using this technique, Purcell built a radio telescope and in 1951 and detected the first hydrogen clouds in space.  He later began studying the biophysics of bacteria.  He was elected to the National Academy of Science in 1953, and served on the President’s Science Advisory Committee from 1957 to 1960 and from 1962 to 1966.  (The Complete Marquis Who's Who. Marquis Who's Who, 1999; Notable Twentieth-Century Scientists Supplement. Gale Research, 1998.)

R

Ravetz, Jerome
MC 100
Recombinant DNA History Collection

(1929 - )  Ravetz received a BA from Swarthmore College in 1950 and a PhD in mathematics from Cambridge University in 1954.  He joined the faculty of Leeds University in 1957 where he taught history and philosophy of science.  From 1977 to 1978, he was a member of the Genetic Manipulation Advisory Group.  He co-authored Uncertainty and Quality in Science for Policy with Silvio Funtowicz in 1991 and authored Cyberfuteres: Culture and Politics on the Information Superhighway in 1996.  (Contemporary Authors Online. The Gale Group, 1999; http://www.isepp.org/1998/drjerry.htm.)

Redford, Emmette
MC 100
Recombinant DNA History Collection

(1904 – 1998)  Redford received a BA and an MA from the University of Texas in 1927 and 1928, and a PhD from Harvard University in 1933.  He joined the faculty of the University of Texas in 1933, becoming a professor of government and public policy in 1939, and remained there for his entire career.  From 1976 to 1979, he was a member of the Recombinant Advisory Committee of the NIH.  (The Complete Marquis Who's Who. Marquis Who's Who, 1999.)

Roberts, Paul
MC 130
MIT-California Division of Highways Project Oral History Collection, 1975

(1933 - )  Roberts received a BS in civil engineering from Texas A&M University in 1955, an MS in transportation and soil mechanics from MIT in 1957, and a PhD in transportation from Northwestern University in 1965.  In 1960, he joined the Department of Civil Engineering at MIT as an assistant professor.  In 1964, he left MIT for Harvard where he was an associate professor at the Business School.  He retuned to MIT in 1972 as a professor and founded the Center for Transportation Study the next year.  After leaving MIT in 1980, he served as the vice president of Science Applications International Corporation and as the president of Transmode Construction from 1983 to 1995.  (The Complete Marquis Who's Who. Marquis Who's Who, 1999; Campbell, Scott.  “Center for Transportation Studies marks 25th anniversary.” Tech Talk. 12/09/98.)

Robertson, David
MC 226
Francis O. Schmitt Oral History of Neuroscience Project, 1986

Roblin, Richard
MC 100
Recombinant DNA History Collection

Rogers, Paul G.
MC 100
Recombinant DNA History Collection

(1921 - )  Rogers received degrees from the University of Florida in 1942 and 1948 and was admitted to the bar in 1948.  He practiced law in West Palm Beach, Florida, until 1955 when he was elected as a Democrat to the eighty-fourth Congress.  He served in the House of Representatives for eleven terms representing the 11th district of Florida.  In 1978, he was the chairman of the Subcommittee on Health and Environment of the Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce where he introduced a bill to regulate recombinant DNA activities.  He resumed the practice of law in 1979 and became a member of the boards of Merck & Company and the Mutual Life Insurance Company of New York.  (United States Congress. Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774-1989. Washington, DC: US Government Printing Office, 1989, pp. Spccoll Reference JK1010.A5 1989)

Rosenblith, Walter A.
MC 226
Francis O. Schmitt Oral History of Neuroscience Project, 1986

MC 574 Online transcript available (PDF)
Rosenblith with his wife, Judy, in a series of interviews in 2000, talks about his early years in Europe, his life after coming to the United States, and his wide-ranging educational and policy accomplishments at MIT and elsewhere.

(1913 - 2006)  Rosenblith received degrees from the Ingenieur Radiotelegraphiste, University of Bordeaux, France, in 1936 and from the Ingenieur Radioelectricien, Ecole Superieure d’Electricite, Paris, in 1937.  Before coming to MIT in 1951, he taught physics at UCLA and at the South Dakota School of Mines and conducted research at Harvard University.  At MIT, he was an associate professor of communications biophysics in the Department of Electrical Engineering, becoming professor in 1957, Institute Professor in 1975, and professor emeritus in 1984.  He was chairman of the faculty from 1967 to 1969, associate provost from 1969 to 1971, and provost from 1971 to 1980.  Rosenblith was central in developing the health sciences and biomedical engineering at MIT and helped establish the Program for Science, Technology, and Society.  He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the AAAS, and IEEE.  In 1999, he was awarded the Okawa Prize for work done in biomedical engineering.  (The Complete Marquis Who's Who. Marquis Who's Who, 1999; “Walter Rosenblith of MIT receives Okawa Prize for work in biomedical engineering.”  Tech Talk. 11/11/99.)

Rubin, Albert
MC 226
Francis O. Schmitt Oral History of Neuroscience Project, 1986

(1927 - )  Rubin studied at Williams College and MIT and received an MD from Cornell University in 1950.  He was director of the Rogosin Institute in 1963 and director of the Rogosin Kidney Center in 1971.  In 1969, he was named a professor of biochemistry, surgery and medicine at Cornell University Medical College.  (The Complete Marquis Who's Who. Marquis Who's Who, 1999.)

S

Samson, Fred
MC 226
Francis O. Schmitt Oral History of Neuroscience Project, 1986

Schaefer, William
MC 130
MIT-California Division of Highways Project Oral History Collection, 1975

Schmitt, Francis O.
MC 55
Interviewed by Walter Rosenblith & Elting Morison;
with
Killian & Buchanan, 3/30/83

(1903 – 1995)  Schmitt received an AB in 1924 and a PhD in 1927, both from Washington University.  He taught zoology at Washington University from 1929 to 1941 before coming to MIT as a professor of biology and head of the Department of Biology in 1941.  At MIT, Schmitt was an authority on the use of an electron microscope and conducted innovative studies on kidney function, tissue metabolism, and the chemistry, physiology, biochemistry, and electrophysiology of the nerve.  He became Institute Professor in 1955 and professor emeritus in 1973.  In 1962, Schmitt helped to found the Neurosciences Research Program and served as its chairman from 1962 to 1974.  Schmitt was a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the American Philosophical Society, and a former president of the Electron Microscope Society of America.  He was awarded the Albert Lasker Award in 1956, the Alsop Award in 1947, and the T. Duckett Jones Award in 1963.  (The Complete Marquis Who's Who. Marquis Who's Who, 1999;  http://web.mit.edu/newsoffice/nr/1995/41242.html.)

Schmitt, Robert
MC 226
Francis O. Schmitt Oral History of Neuroscience Project, 1986

Schmitt, Otto
MC 226
Francis O. Schmitt Oral History of Neuroscience Project, 1986

(? – 1999)  At the time of his death, Schmitt was professor emeritus of physics and electrical engineering at the University of Minnesota, which he joined in the 1940s.  During World War II, he conducted research to develop submarine detecting equipment.  In 1938 he invented the “Schmitt trigger” which is used in electronic devices.  Form 1958 to 1961, he was the chairman of the Bio-Astronautics Council which studied the conditions needed to support human life in space.  (http://www1.umn.edu/urelate/datebook/1999/schmitt.html.)

Schwartz, Arthur
MC 100
Recombinant DNA History Collection

Seamans, Robert
Audio-Visual Services
Roundtable with L. Bucciarelli & W. Hollister, 1997

(1918 - )  Seamans received a BS from Harvard University in 1939, an MS from MIT in 1942, and an ScD from MIT in 1951.  From 1941 to 1955, he was an associate professor at MIT in the Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics and a staff engineer at the Instrumentation Laboratory.  He was associate director of NASA from 1960 to 1968 and deputy director from 1968 to 1969 during the Apollo project.  From 1978 to 1981, he was the dean of engineering at MIT.  Today he is professor emeritus of aeronautics and astronautics.  (The Complete Marquis Who's Who. Marquis Who's Who, 1999; Waugh, Alice C.  “Apollo contributions remembered.” Tech Talk. 11/29/95.)

Setlow, Jane
MC 100
Recombinant DNA History Collection

(1919 - )  Setlow received a BA from Swarthmore College in 1940 and a PhD from Yale University in 1959.  From 1960 to 1974, she served in the biology division at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.  In 1974, she joined the Brookhaven National Laboratory as a biophysicist.  From 1978 to 1980, she was a member of the Recombinant DNA Molecule Program Advisory Committee of the NIH.  (The Complete Marquis Who's Who. Marquis Who's Who, 1999.)

Sgaramella, Vittorio
MC 100
Recombinant DNA History Collection

Siefert, William Walther
MC 89
Ocean Engineering Oral History Collection, 1962-1976.

Simopoulos, Artemis
MC 100
Recombinant DNA History Collection

(1933 - )  Simopoulos received a BA from Barnard College in 1952 and an MD from Boston University in 1956.  He joined the NIH in 1968 where he worked until 1986.  There he served as a pediatrician, the executive director of child and family research, and vice chairman and executive secretary of the nutrition coordinating committee.  Simultaneously, he served as the executive secretary for the National Academy of Sciences from 1974 to 1976.  In 1990, he joined the Center for Genetics, Nutrition and Health as the director and became its president in 1990.  He was awarded the Outstanding Achievement Award for Promoting Nutrition and Fitness and Positive Health from the government of Greece in 1992.  (The Complete Marquis Who's Who. Marquis Who's Who, 1999.)

Singer, Maxine
MC 100
Recombinant DNA History Collection

(1931 - )  Singer received an AB from Swarthmore College in 1952 and a PhD from Yale University in 1957.  Throughout her career, Singer has been an advocate for responsible biochemical genetic research.  During the recombinant DNA controversy in the 1970s, she co-wrote the Singer-Soll letter with Dieter Soll warning about the unpredictable consequences that could occur from genetic research.   She was a research chemist at the NIH from 1958 to 1974, then chief of the Laboratory of Biochemistry at the National Cancer Institute.  In 1988, she became the president of the Carnegie Institution.  She co-authored with Paul Berg Genes and Genomes: A Changing Perspective and Dealing with Genes: The Language of Heredity. She also served on the editorial board of Science magazine.  In 1999, she was awarded the National Science Board's Vannevar Bush Award.  (The Complete Marquis Who's Who. Marquis Who's Who, 1999; Contemporary Authors Online. The Gale Group, 1999.)

Singer, Daniel
MC 100
Recombinant DNA History Collection

(1930 - )  Singer received a BA from Swarthmore College in 1951 and an LLB from Yale University in 1954.  He served as a law clerk and a motions clerk in the US Court of Appeals for the DC Circuit from 1956 to 1958.  In 1958, he joined the law firm of Fried, Frank, Harris, Shriver & Jacobsen in Washington, DC as an associate and became a partner in 1965.  He was a participant and  speaker at the Asilomar Conference in 1975.  (The Complete Marquis Who's Who. Marquis Who's Who, 1999.)

Sinsheimer, Robert
MC 100
Recombinant DNA History Collection

(1920 - )  Sinsheimer received an SB in 1941, an MS in 1942, and a PhD in 1948, all from MIT.  He was a staff member of MIT’s Radiation Laboratory from 1942 to 1946 before going to Iowa State University where he taught biophysics from 1949 to 1957.  In 1957, he joined the faculty at the California Institute of Technology where in 1967, Sinsheimer was able to isolate, purify and synthetically replicate viral DNA.  He left CalTech in 1977 for the University of California, Santa Barbara, where he was chancellor from 1977 to 1987 and became professor emeritus in 1990.  In 1968, he was named California Scientist of the Year, and he is a member of the National Academy of Sciences.  (The Complete Marquis Who's Who. Marquis Who's Who, 1999;  http://93106.ic.ucsb.edu/051099/.)

Smith, Barry
MC 226
Francis O. Schmitt Oral History of Neuroscience Project, 1986

Smith, Kevin
77-110
Physical Science Study Committee Oral History Collection, 1956-1976

Soderberg, Carl Richard
77-37
Oral history collection, 1976

Spizizen, John
MC 100
Recombinant DNA History Collection

(1917 - )  Spizizen received a BA from the University of Toronto in 1939 and a PhD from the California Institute of Technology in 1942.  He was associate professor of microbiology at Western Reserve University from 1946 to 1954 and professor and the head of microbiology at the University of Minnesota from 1961 to 1965.  In 1965, he was the chairman of microbiology at the Scripps Clinic and Research Foundation. In 1979, he left for the University of Arizona to serve as a professor.  In 1987, he was named professor emeritus.  He is a member of the American Society of Microbiology and the American Society of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.  (The Complete Marquis Who's Who. Marquis Who's Who, 1999.)

Steiner, Lisa Amelia
MC 86
Women in Science and Engineering Oral History

(1933 - )  Steiner received a BA from Swarthmore College in 1954, an MA from Radcliffe College in 1956, and an MD from Yale University in 1959.  From 1962 to 1965, she was a researcher at Washington University’s School of Medicine and in 1967, she joined the faculty of MIT as an assistant professor of immunology.  She has done research on the biochemical aspects of the immune system.  In 1980, she became a full professor and currently conducts research on the development of the immune system at the Steiner Laboratory at MIT.  (The Complete Marquis Who's Who. Marquis Who's Who, 1999;  http://web.mit.edu/biology/steiner/.)

Stetten, DeWitt
MC 100
Recombinant DNA History Collection

(1909 – 1990)  Stetten received a BA from Harvard University in 1930, an MD from Columbia University in 1934, and a PhD from Columbia University in 1940.  He taught at several medical schools including Harvard Medical School, Columbia College of Physicians and Surgeons, and Rotger Medical School.  In 1970, he became director of the National Institutes of Health, serving until 1974.  He remained at the NIH until 1986 also serving as deputy director, science advisor to the director, and chairman of the Recombinant DNA Molecule Program Advisory Committee.  He was a member of the AAAS, American Chemical Society, and the American Society of Biologists and Chemists.  (The Complete Marquis Who's Who. Marquis Who's Who, 1999.)

Stever, H. Guyford
MC 55
Interviewed by Walter Rosenblith & Elting Morison;
with
Killian & Wiesner, 11/18/82

(1916 - )  Stever received an AB from Colgate University in 1938 and a PhD from the California Institute of Technology in 1941.  He spent most of his career working towards improving the relationship between science, technology and the government.  From 1941 to 1942, he was member of MIT’s Radiation Laboratory before joining the Office of Science, Research, and Development where he worked analyzing enemy technology during World War II.  In 1946, he joined the faculty of MIT, becoming a professor in 1956.  During his twenty years at MIT, he served as the head of the departments of mechanical engineering, naval architecture, and marine engineering.  He also conducted research dealing with guided missiles and transonic speed flight.  In 1965, he left MIT to become the president of the Carnegie Institute of Technology where he oversaw its merger with the Mellon Institute.  He was the head the National Science Foundation from 1973 to 1976 and served as science advisor to President Ford.  Some of the advisory panels he was a part of include the US Air Force Scientific Advisory Board, the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics, and various panels in Congress.  (The Complete Marquis Who's Who. Marquis Who's Who, 1999; Notable Twentieth-Century Scientists. Gale Research, 1995.)

Stratton, Julius
(1) MC 55
Interviewed by W. Rosenblith & Elting Morison;
with Brown & Weisskopf, 12/22/82

(2) MC 55
Interviewed by Walter Rosenblith & Elting Morison;
with Brown & Weisskopf, 10/24/83

(1901 – 1994)  Stratton received an SB from MIT in 1923, an SM from MIT in 1926, and an ScD from the Eidgenossische Technische Hochschule in 1928.  He joined MIT in 1924 as a research assistant in the Department of Electrical Engineering, becoming an assistant professor in 1928 and a professor of physics in 1941.  His research focused on communications and theoretical physics.  He was a member of MIT’s Radiation Laboratory during World War II where he worked on the development of LORAN and assisted in the planning of the use of radar for the Normandy invasion.  Following the war, he was the first director of the Research Laboratory of Electronics at MIT in 1944, the first provost of MIT in 1949, and the first chancellor of MIT in 1959.  From 1959 to 1966, he served as the eleventh president of MIT.  After retiring in 1966, he became a trustee of the Ford Foundation and served as it’s chairman from 1967 to 1971.  He authored Electromagnetic Theory in 1941 and was chairman of the Commission on Marine Science, Engineering, and Resources from 1967 to 1969.  (The Complete Marquis Who's Who. Marquis Who's Who, 1999;  “President Emeritus Julius Adams Stratton Dies at 93.”  Tech Talk. 06/29/94.)

Sullivan, Walter
MC 100
Recombinant DNA History Collection

Sullivan, James
MC 100
Recombinant DNA History Collection

Sweet, William
MC 226
Francis O. Schmitt Oral History of Neuroscience Project, 1986

(1910 - )  Sweet received an SB from the University of Washington in 1930, a BSc from Oxford University in 1934, and an MD from Harvard University in 1936.  He served as a neurosurgeon at Massachusetts General Hospital from 1945 to 1977 and as senior neurosurgeon from 1977 to 1996.  Simultaneously in 1945, he began teaching at Harvard Medical School as an instructor of surgery.  In 1965, he was appointed professor and in 1976, professor emeritus.  He authored Pain and the Neurosurgeon: A Forty Year Experience in 1969 and co-authored Pain: Its Mechanisms and Neurosurgical Control in 1955 with J. C. White. (The Complete Marquis Who's Who. Marquis Who's Who, 1999.)

T

Talalay, Paul
MC 226
Francis O. Schmitt Oral History of Neuroscience Project, 1986

(1923 - )  Talalay received an SB from MIT in 1944 and an MD from Yale University in 1948.  He taught at the University of Chicago as an assistant professor in biochemistry and surgery from 1950 to 1957 and became a full professor in 1957.  In 1963, he became the director of the Department of Pharmacology at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine.  Currently, he is a professor in the Department of Pharmacology and Molecular Sciences at Johns Hopkins and conducts research dealing with chemoprotection against cancer and the enzymology of steroid hormones.  (The Complete Marquis Who's Who. Marquis Who's Who, 1999;  http://www.med.jhu.edu/pharmacology/pages/faculty/
talalay.html
.) 

Talbot, Paul
MC 130
MIT-California Division of Highways Project Oral History Collection, 1975

Taylor, Charles Fayette
77-118
Oral history collection, 1976-1977

Tesoro, Giuliana Cavalieri
MC 86
Women in Science and Engineering Oral History

(1921 - )  Tesoro received a PhD from Yale University in 1943.  She has done research at a number of companies such as Onyx Chemical Company, J. P. Stevens, the Textile Research Institute, and Burlington Industries.  Her research focuses on polymers, specifically textile chemistry.  She developed the first antistatic chemical of synthetic fibers, improved the permanent press property of textiles, and developed flame resistant fabrics.  In 1973, she was a visiting professor at MIT and in 1985, she left MIT for a position as a research professor at the Polytechnic University in Brooklyn.  She received the Olney Medal of the American Association of Textile Chemists and Colorists in 1963 and she is a member of the AAAS and the American Chemical Society.  She also holds over one hundred patents.  (Notable Twentieth-Century Scientists. Gale Research, 1995; The Complete Marquis Who's Who. Marquis Who's Who, 1999; MC 86)

Teuber, Hans-Lukas
MC 133
MIT Committee on the Use of Humans as Experimental Subjects Oral History Collection, 1976.

(1916 – 1977)  In 1947,  Teuber established the Psychophysiological Laboratory at the New York University Bellevue Medical Center.  There he conducted research on head injured war veterans, children, and infrahuman animals.  In 1961, he joined MIT where he organized the new Department of Psychology which became the Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences.  Also at MIT, he helped to establish the first MIT Review Committee on Human Subjects after he resigned in protest as the chairman of the Advisory Committee to the Surgeon General of the US Army for experiments done on humans with psychedelic drugs.  (http://cognet.mit.edu/MITECS/Entries/gross2_r.html.)

Thomas, Charles
MC 100
Recombinant DNA History Collection

Thompson, Dorothy Dewhurst
MC 86
Women in Science and Engineering Oral History


Thornton, Ray
MC 100
Recombinant DNA History Collection

(1928 - )  Thornton received a BA from Yale University in 1956 and a JD from the University of Arkansas in 1956.  He practiced private law from 1956 to 1970 in Sheridan and Little Rock, Arkansas.  From 1971 to 1973, he served as the attorney general of Arkansas and he served as a member of the 93rd to 95th  and 102nd to 104th Congresses as a representative.  Currently, he is an associate justice of the Arkansas Supreme Court.  While he was a member of the 93rd to 95th Congresses, he was the chairman of the subcommittee on Science, Research and Technology and was involved in national legislation for the regulation of recombinant DNA research.  (The Complete Marquis Who's Who. Marquis Who's Who, 1999.)

Thurow, Lester
Museum
Interviewed 6/21/90

Tiollais, Pierre
MC 100
Recombinant DNA History Collection

1934 - )  Tiollais received an MD from the University of Paris.  From 1967 to 1972, he was a scientist at the Institute Nationalle de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale.  In 1972, he joined the faculty of medicine at the University of Paris as a professor.  In 1980, he joined the Institute Pasteur as chief of a laboratory and in 1988, he became a professor there.  He has conducted research in AIDS, retroviruses, hepatitis B and cancer.  In 1980, he helped develop a vaccine for hepatitis B effective in animal cells using recombinant DNA techniques.  Currently, he is a member of the Department of AIDS and Retroviruses at the Institute Pasteur.  (The Complete Marquis Who's Who. Marquis Who's Who, 1999;  http://www.pasteur.fr//recherche/RAR/RAR1999/
unites.html#D8
;
http://www.pasteur.fr//actu/presse/com/dossiers/vaccins/
vac1.html
.)

Tooze, John
MC 100
Recombinant DNA History Collection

U

Uzman, Betty
MC 226
Francis O. Schmitt Oral History of Neuroscience Project, 1986

(1922 - )  Uzman received a BS from the University of Arkansas in 1942 and an MD from Washington University in 1945.  From 1950 to 1971, she was the chief of biological ultrastructure and pathology at the Children’s Cancer Research Foundation in Boston.  Simultaneously, she taught at Harvard Medical School starting as an instructor in 1949, eventually becoming a professor in 1972.  She left Harvard in 1974 for Louisiana State University where she was a professor of pathology.  From 1978 to 1988, she was a professor at the University of Tennessee.  She is a member of the AAAS, the American Society of Cell Biology, and the American Academy of Neurology.  (The Complete Marquis Who's Who. Marquis Who's Who, 1999.)

V

Valley, Shea Alice LaBont
MC 86
Women in Science and Engineering Oral History

Valtz, Amelia Brooks
MC 86
Women in Science and Engineering Oral History

Vellucci, Alfred
MC 100
Recombinant DNA History Collection

Veneziano, Daniele
Museum

W

Wade, Nicholas
MC 100
Recombinant DNA History Collection

(1942 - )  Wade received a BA in 1960 and an MA in 1963, both from Cambridge University.  From 1967 to 1971, he was a journalist for Nature magazine. From 1972 to 1982, he was a journalist for Science magazine where he covered the Asilomar conference.  In 1982, he became an editorial writer for the New York Times and in 1990, editor of the Science section.  Some of the books he has authored are The Ultimate Experiment in 1977, The Nobel Duel in 1981, and A World Beyond Healing in 1987.  (The Complete Marquis Who's Who. Marquis Who's Who, 1999.)

Walters, LeRoy
MC 100
Recombinant DNA History Collection

(1940 - )  Walters received a BA from Messiah College in 1962, an M.Phil from Yale University in 1970, and a PhD from Yale in 1971.  After receiving his degree, he served as the director of the Center for Bioethics at the Kennedy Institute of Ethics.  From 1975 to 1980, he was an associate professor of philosophy there.  From 1976 to 1977, he was the chairman of the US Department of Health, Education and Welfare’s work group on informed consent for the national immunization policy studies.  He was also a member of the NIH Advisory Committee during that time.  (Contemporary Authors Online. The Gale Group, 1999.)

Weisskopf, Victor
(1) MC 55
Interviewed by Walter Rosenblith & Elting Morison;
with Stratton & Brown, 12/22/82

(2) MC 55
Interviewed by Walter Rosenblith & Elting Morison;
with Stratton & Brown, 10/24/83

(1908 - )  Weisskopf received a PhD from the University of Goettingen in 1931.  During his career, he made a number of contributions to quantum electrodynamics and nuclear and particle physics.  In 1937, he accepted a teaching position at the University of Rochester and in 1943, he worked on the Manhattan Project at the Los Alamos Laboratory.  He joined the faculty of MIT as a professor in the physics department in 1945, becoming Institute Professor in 1966.  In 1967, he became the head of the Department of Physics, a position he held until 1973.  From 1961 to 1965, he was director general of the European Organization for Nuclear Research.  In addition to his physics work, he worked towards promoting arms control and disarmament and helped found both the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientist and the Federation of American Scientists.  He was awarded the Max Planck Medal in 1956 and the National Medal of Science in 1980.  (The Complete Marquis Who's Who. Marquis Who's Who, 1999; “Guth is Appointed Weisskopf Professor.”  Tech Talk. 1/29/2000.)

Weissmann, Charles
MC 100
Recombinant DNA History Collection

(1931 - )  Weissmann received an MD and a PhD from the University of Zurich.  He has been president of the Swiss Society for Cell and Molecular Biology, director of the Molecular Biology Institute, and chairman of the science board of Biogen.  In 1986, he was named president of Ernst Hadorn-Stiftung.  He was the chairman of the EMBO Standing Advisory Committee on Recombinant DNA in 1975.  (The Complete Marquis Who's Who. Marquis Who's Who, 1999; MC 100.)

Welsch, Frederico
MC 100
Recombinant DNA History Collection

Wheeler, Cornelia
MC 100
Recombinant DNA History Collection

Whitmarsh, Charles
MC 130
MIT-California Division of Highways Project Oral History Collection, 1975

Wick, Emily
(1) Audio-Visual Services

(2) MC 356
MIT Alumnae Oral History Collection

Widnall, Sheila Evans
MC 86
Women in Science and Engineering Oral History

(1938 - )  Widnall received a BS in 1960, an MS in 1961, and an ScD in 1964, all from MIT.  In 1964, she became the first alumna to join the engineering faculty, serving as an assistant professor of mathematics and aeronautics.  She became an associate professor in 1970 and professor in 1974.  In addition to teaching, she served as the head of the Division of Fluid Mechanics from 1975 to 1979, the director of the Fluid Dynamics Laboratory from 1979 to 1990, and as the chairman of the faculty from 1979 to 1980.  She also established an Anechoic Wind Tunnel at MIT where she conducted research on vortices and their relation to aerodynamics.  Her other research has dealt with wing theory, unsteady aerodynamics, and turbulence.  Outside of MIT, she was the first director of University Research of the US Department of Transportation from 1974 to 1975, and the first woman to serve as Secretary of the Air Force from 1993 to 1997.  She is a member of the AAAS, the AIAA, the NAS, and the NAE.  Her awards include the Lawrence Sperry Award from the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics in 1972, the Outstanding Achievement Award from the Society of Women Engineers in 1975, and the Washburn Award from the Boston Museum of Science in 1987.  (The Complete Marquis Who's Who. Marquis Who's Who, 1999; Encyclopedia of World Biography, 2nd ed. 17 Vols. Gale Research, 1998; MC 86)

Wiegand, Ronald
MC 100
Recombinant DNA History Collection

Wieman, Lawrence
MC 130
MIT-California Division of Highways Project Oral History Collection, 1975

Wiesner, Jerome
MC 55
Interviewed by Walter Rosenblith & Elting Morison;
with Killian & Stever, 11/18/82

(1915 – 1994)  Wiesner received a BS in 1937, an MS in 1938, and a PhD in 1950, all from the University of Michigan.  Wiesner was a member of the Radiation Laboratory at MIT from 1942 to 1945 where he conducted research on microwave radar and worked on developing an airborne radar system.  He was appointed a professor at MIT in 1950 and was head of the Department of Electrical Engineering from 1959 to 1960. He worked in MIT’s Research Laboratory of Electronics from 1946 to 1961. Wiesner was dean of science from 1964 to 1966 and provost from 1966 to 1971.  From 1971 to 1980, he served as the thirteenth president of MIT.  During most of his career, Wiesner was an advocate for arms control, helping to establish the Arms Control and Disarmament Agency and lobbying for a partial nuclear test ban treaty.  He served in many advisory positions in the government such as science advisor to President Kennedy and President Johnson.  He was a member of the IEEE, the AAAS, the NAS and the NAE.  Some of the awards he received are the President’s Certificate of Merit in 1948, the National Academy of Engineering's Arthur M. Bueche Award for long-term contributions to public understanding of the risks of the nuclear age in 1985, and the government of Colombia's The Order of Boyaca, its highest distinction "in recognition of the distinguished service to humankind" in 1980.  (The Complete Marquis Who's Who. Marquis Who's Who, 1999; “President emeritus Jerome Wiesner is dead at 79.”  Tech Talk. 10/26/94.)

Williams, Alfred (Sandy)
MC 89
Ocean Engineering Oral History Collection, 1962-1976

Williams, Carroll
MC 226
Francis O. Schmitt Oral History of Neuroscience Project, 1986

(1916 - 1991)  Williams received an SB from the University of Richmond in 1937, an AM from Harvard University in 1938, and a PhD from Harvard in 1941.  He joined the faculty of Harvard in 1946 as assistant professor, becoming an associate professor in 1948 and a full professor in 1953.  In the 1950s, he was the first to identify and extract the juvenile hormone in insects responsible for their maturity.  This lead to the development of third generation pesticides.  He also discovered additional brain hormones that control maturity and enzymes that control muscles.  He served as the chairman of the Department of Biology at Harvard from 1959 to 1962, and as the chairman of the Department of Cellular and Developmental Biology from 1972 to 1973.  He was a member of the AAAS and the NAS.  (The Complete Marquis Who's Who. Marquis Who's Who, 1999; “Memorial Minutes on Carroll Williams (FAS) and Aaron Gissen (HMS) and Louis Zetzel (HMS).”  The Harvard University Gazette.  03/21/1996)

Wollman, E. L.
MC 100
Recombinant DNA History Collection

Wood, Shirley
MC 100
Recombinant DNA History Collection


Worden, Frederic
MC 226
Francis O. Schmitt Oral History of Neuroscience Project, 1986

(1918 – 1995)  Worden received an AB from Dartmouth College in 1939 and an MD from the University of Chicago in 1942.  He joined the faculty of MIT in 1969 as a professor of psychiatry and was the director of the Neurosciences Research Program until 1983.  In 1983, he was named professor emeritus.  Previous to MIT, he served on the faculty of UCLA from 1953 to 1969 as research psychiatrist and as a professor of psychiatry.   He was also a supervisor of therapy and a clinical director at the Sheppard and Enoch Pratt Hospital from 1950 to 1953.  He served on the boards of Dartmouth Medical School and the NIMH and was a member of the AAAS and the Society for Neuroscience.  (The Complete Marquis Who's Who. Marquis Who's Who, 1999.)

Wright, Susan
MC 100
Recombinant DNA History Collection

Wyley
Museum 
Biographical interview by Bill Stuckey, 1970

Wyman, Jeffries
MC 85
J. Robert Oppenheimer Oral history Collection, 1975-1976

Z

Zacharias, Jerrold
(1) Museum
Biographical interview by Bill Stuckey, 1970

(2) 77-10
Physical Science Study Committee Oral History Collection, 1956-1976

(3) MC 55
Interviewed by Walter Rosenblith & Elting Morison;
with Edgerton & Benedict, 4/23/84

(1905 – 1986)  Zacharias received an AB in 1926, an AM in 1927, and a PhD in 1933, all from Columbia University.  From 1931 to 1940, he was an assistant professor at Hunter College before joining the Radiation Laboratory at MIT.  There he worked with I. I. Rabi in the molecular beam laboratory and was responsible for installing the first microwave radar on a US destroyer.  For a brief period from 1944 to 1945, he directed the engineering division at Los Alamos Laboratory.  He joined the faculty of MIT in 1946 as a professor of physics, becoming Institute Professor in 1966 and professor emeritus in 1970.  From 1946 to 1956, he was the director of the Laboratory for Nuclear Science.  In 1955, he supervised the construction of the first atomic clock.  In 1956, he chaired the Physical Science Study Committee at MIT where he worked towards reorganizing and modernizing high school physics curriculums.  He received the Oersted Medal for Notable Contributions to the Teaching of Physics in 1960.  (The Complete Marquis Who's Who. Marquis Who's Who, 1999; The Scribner Encyclopedia of American Lives, Vol. 2: 1986-1990. Charles Scribner's Sons, 1999.)

Zachau, Hans G.
MC 100
Recombinant DNA History Collection

(1930 - )  Zachau received a diploma in chemistry from the University of Frankfurt in 1953 and a DSc from the University of Tübingen in 1955.  He was a researcher at the Max Planck Institute from 1958 to 1961 and at the University of Köln from 1961 to 1966.  In 1967, he joined the University of München as a professor.  He is a member of the Russian Academy of Sciences and the American Society of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.  (The Complete Marquis Who's Who. Marquis Who's Who, 1999.)

Zander, Alvin
MC 100
Recombinant DNA History Collection

(1913 - )  Zander received a BS in 1936, an MS in Public Health in 1937, and a PhD in 1942, all from the University of Michigan.  From 1946 to 1947, he was an assistant professor at Springfield College.  He joined the faculty of the University of Michigan in 1959 as a professor of psychology and director of the Research Center for Group Dynamics.  From 1973 to 1980, he was the associate vice president of the University of Michigan.  He is a member of the American Psychological Society.  (The Complete Marquis Who's Who. Marquis Who's Who, 1999.)

Zarsky, Leona Norman
MC 356
MIT Alumnae Oral History Collection

Zimmerman, Burke
MC 100
Recombinant DNA History Collection

Zinder, Norton
MC 100
Recombinant DNA History Collection

(1928 - )  Zinder received an AB from Columbia University in 1947, an MS from the University of Wisconsin in 1949, and a PhD from the University of Wisconsin in 1952.  He joined the faculty of Rockefeller University in 1952, becoming a professor of genetics in 1964 and professor emeritus in 1999.  He also served as the dean of graduate and post graduate studies from 1993 to 1995.  Zinder is known for his discovery of bacterial transduction and the discovery of the F2 phage. He currently conducts research on the molecular genetics of phages.  He is a member of the AAAS, the NAS, and the Genetics Society of America.  He was awarded the Eli Lilly award in microbiology in 1966, the United States Steel Award in Molecular Biology from the National Academy of Sciences in 1966, and the Medal of Excellence from Columbia University in 1969.  (The Complete Marquis Who's Who. Marquis Who's Who, 1999; Notable Twentieth-Century Scientists. Gale Research, 1995.)

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