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Oral History Holdings at MIT

MIT-related Oral Histories at Other Institutions


Rules for use of oral histories will vary depending upon their origins. Contact the appropriate holder at either the MIT Institute Archives and Special Collections or the MIT Museum for specific information.

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M

Oral Histories at MIT (N-Z)

A

Ackermann, Barbara
MC 100
Recombinant DNA History Collection

Adams, Rob
MC 130
MIT-California Division of Highways Project Oral History Collection, 1975

Adelman, George
MC 226
Francis O. Schmitt Oral History of Neuroscience Project, 1986

(1926 - ) Adelman received a BA from Dartmouth College in 1947, an MA in psychology from Boston University in 1949, and an MSLS from Simmons College in 1950.  He served as the managing editor and librarian for the Neuroscience Research Program at MIT from 1964 to 1982.  Since 1992, he has been a visiting scientist at MIT’s National Magnet Laboratory.  (Who’s Who in Science and Engineering, 1st ed.)

Anderson, E. S.
MC 100
Recombinant DNA History Collection

Auerbach, Stuart
MC 100
Recombinant DNA History Collection

(1935 -) Auerbach received a BA from Williams College in 1957.  From 1968 to 1997, he held various positions at the Washington Post such as medical and science writer, Middle East correspondent, legal affairs correspondent, and columnist.  He has done assignments on the moon landing, civil rights, the civil war in Lebanon, and genetic engineering.  Since 1997, he has been the director of development and a trustee at the Media Development Loan Fund. (The Complete Marquis Who’s Who.  Marquis Who’s Who, 1999;  Contemporary Authors Online. The Gale Group, 1999.)

Austin, Pauline
MC 356
MIT Alumnae Oral History Collection

B

Baer, Adela
MC 100
Recombinant DNA History Collection

(1931 - ) Baer received a BS from the University of Illinois in 1953 and a PhD from the University of California, Berkeley, in 1963.  She is a member of the Genetic Society of America, the American Society of Human Genetics, and the Society for Social Biology.  She testified before the San Diego Quality of Life Board Recombinant DNA Study Committee in 1978.  (Contemporary Authors Online.  The Gale Group, 1999; MC 100 – Recombinant DNA History Collection)

Baggeroer, Arthur
MC 89
Ocean Engineering Oral History Collection, 1962-1976

(1942 - ) Baggeroer received a BSEE from Purdue University in 1963 and an ScD from MIT in 1968.  He joined the faculties of Ocean and Electrical Engineering at MIT in 1968 and became a full professor in 1980.  From 1983 to 1988, he served as the director of the MIT – Woods Hole Joint Program in Oceanography and Oceanographic Engineering.  He holds memberships in Tau Beta Pi, Eta Kappa Nu, and the Oceanic Engineering Group.  (http://acoustics.mit.edu/arctic0/abb/www/bib.htmlThe Complete Marquis Who's Who. Marquis Who's Who, 1999.)

Baltimore, David
MC 100
Recombinant DNA History Collection

(1938 - ) Baltimore received a BA in chemistry from Swarthmore College in 1960 and a PhD from Rockefeller University in 1964.  He shared the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine in 1975 for his discovery of reverse transcriptase.  From 1968 to 1997, he taught at MIT, becoming a professor of biology in 1972 and Institute Professor in 1995.  He also served as the director of the Whitehead Institute of Biomedical Research from 1982 to 1990.  Currently, he is the president of the California Institute of Technology.  Additional awards he has received are the Gustav Stern award in virology in 1970, the Eli Lilly and Company award in microbiology and immunology in 1971, and the National Medal of Science in 1999.   (The Complete Marquis Who's Who. Marquis Who's Who, 1999; American Decades CD-ROM. Gale Research, 1998.)

Banach, Sr. Mary Lucille
MC 100
Recombinant DNA History Collection

Benedict, Manson
MC 55
Interviewed by Walter Rosenblith & Elting Morison;
with Edgerton & Zacharias, 4/23/84

(1907 - ) Benedict received a BA in chemistry from Cornell University in 1928, an MS from MIT in 1932, and a PhD from MIT in 1935.  In 1951, he returned to MIT to become the Institute’s first professor of nuclear engineering.  In 1969, he became an Institute Professor and professor emeritus in 1973.  He also served as the first head of the Department of Nuclear Engineering from 1958 to 1971.  In 1975, he received the National Medal of Science.  (The Complete Marquis Who's Who. Marquis Who's Who, 1999; http://web.mit.edu/facts/faculty.html; http://libraries.mit.edu/archives/histories/nuceng.html.)

Berg, Paul
MC 100
Recombinant DNA History Collection

(1926 - ) Berg received a BS from Pennsylvania State University in 1948 and a PhD from Case Western Reserve University in 1952.  In 1956, he became an assistant professor in microbiology at the Washington University School of Medicine, and shortly after, in 1959, he became a professor at Stanford University.  In 1980, he won the Nobel prize in chemistry for discoveries he made while at Stanford.  Berg developed various techniques for splicing DNA that helped in the study of chromosomes and also served as the basis of the field of gene therapy.  He was also an activist in his field, submitting in 1974 with a group of colleagues the “Berg letter” calling for caution and regulation in the field of recombinant DNA.  (American Decades CD-ROM. Gale Research, 1998; The Complete Marquis Who's Who. Marquis Who's Who, 1999.)

Bernardi, Georgio
MC 100
Recombinant DNA History Collection

Bernheim, Frederick
MC 85
J. Robert Oppenheimer Oral history Collection, 1975-1976

(1905 - ) Professor of Pharmacology at Duke Medical Center, 1946  (The Complete Marquis Who's Who. Marquis Who's Who, 1999.)

Biena
Museum
Biographical interview by Bill Stuckey, 1970

Bloom, Floyd
MC 226
Francis O. Schmitt Oral History of Neuroscience Project, 1986

(1936 - )  Bloom received an AB from South Methodist University in 1956 and an MD from Washington University in 1960.  From 1964 to 1968, Bloom served as an assistant professor at the Yale School of Medicine.  In 1968, he left Yale for the NIMH where he served as chief of laboratory neuropharmacology from 1968 to 1975 and as the acting director of the division of special mental health from 1973 to 1975.  He has co-authored three books, collaborating with Francis Schmitt in 1983 on Molecular Genetic Neuroscience.  Currently, Bloom is the editor in chief of Science Magazine.  (Contemporary Authors Online. The Gale Group, 1999; The Complete Marquis Who's Who. Marquis Who's Who, 1999.)

Bodmer, Walter
MC 100
Recombinant DNA History Collection

(1936 - )  Bodmer received a BA in 1956 and a PhD in 1959, both from the University of Cambridge.  From 1961 to 1971, Bodmer was a visiting assistant professor in the Department of Genetics at the Stanford School of Medicine.  Following that, he accepted a professorship at the Department of Genetics at the University of Oxford where he served from 1970 to 1979. In 1986, Bodmer chaired a meeting in Washington of scientists interested in creating a map of the human genome.  The meeeting resulted in the creation of the Human Genome Organization of which Bodmer became president in 1990.  Bodmer also served as the director–general of the Imperial Cancer Research Fund from 1996 to 1997 and is currently the principal of Hertford College in Oxford.  In 1986, he was knighted by Queen Elizabeth II for his genetics work.  (Notable Twentieth-Century Scientists. Supplement. Gale Research, 1998; The Complete Marquis Who's Who. Marquis Who's Who, 1999.)

Bowe, Dorothy
Audio-Visual Services

Bowles, Edward
Museum

Boyd, William C.
MC 85
J. Robert Oppenheimer Oral History Collection, 1975-1976

Boyer, Herbert
MC 100
Recombinant DNA History Collection

(1936 - )  Boyer received a BA from Saint Vincent College in 1958, an MS from the University of Pittsburgh in 1960, and a PhD from the University of Pittsburgh in 1963.  He joined the faculty of the University of California, San Francisco, in 1966 where he became a professor in 1976 and professor emeritus in 1991.  In 1980, Boyer, along with Stanley N. Cohen of Stanford, obtained the first patent in the field of recombinant DNA involving a technique for gene splicing.  He succeeded, in 1973, of inserting the genes taken from two different organisms into an E. coli bacteria.  In 1976, Boyer started the biotech firm Genentech with Robert Swanson.  He received the National Medal of Science in 1990. (Notable Twentieth-Century Scientists. Gale Research, 1995; Contemporary Newsmakers 1985, 1985 Cumulation. GaleGroup, 1986; The Complete Marquis Who's Who. Marquis Who's Who, 1999.)

Branton, Daniel
MC 100
Recombinant DNA History Collection

(1932 - )  Branton received an AB in mathematics from Cornell University in 1954, an MS in pomology from the University of California in 1957, and a PhD in plant physiology from the University of California in 1961.  Branton served as an assistant professor of botany at the University of California from 1963 to 1973.  In 1973, he accepted a professorship at Harvard University where he has taught ever since.  He is a member of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the Biophysical Society, and the American Society for Cell Biology.  (The Complete Marquis Who's Who. Marquis Who's Who, 1999; http://www.mcb.harvard.edu/branton/dansCV.htm.)

Brenner, Sydney
MC 100
Recombinant DNA History Collection

(1927 - )  Brenner received an MSc from the University of Witwatersran in 1947, an MB and BCh from the University of Witwatersran in 1952, and a DPhil from Oxford University in 1954.  He was a member of the Medical Research Council of Cambridge, England, serving as director of molecular biology from 1979 to 1986 and as director of molecular genetics from 1986 to 1991.  Brenner, along with Francois Jacob and Matthew Meselson, discovered mRNA in 1961.  In 1963, Brenner started a project to map out the entire genome and nervous system of C. elegans that took three decades to complete.  Brenner was awarded the Albert Lasker Medical Research Award in 1971 and the Kyoto prize in 1990. (Notable Twentieth-Century Scientists. Gale Research, 199;  The Complete Marquis Who's Who. Marquis Who's Who, 1999.)

Brown, Donald
MC 100
Recombinant DNA History Collection

Brown, Gordon
MC 55
Interviewed by Walter Rosenblith & Elting Morison;
with Stratton & Wiesskopf, 12/22/82

86-55 (MC 24)
Interview, 1985.

(1907 – 1996)  Brown received an SB in electrical engineering in 1931, an SM in 1934, and an ScD in 1938, all from MIT.  For the next forty years he remained at MIT becoming an associate professor in 1941, a professor in 1946, and Institute Professor in 1973. In 1940, he founded the Servomechanisms Laboratory at MIT where the Whirlwind computer was developed.  Brown was a pioneer in the field of system dynamics which grew out of the Servomechanisms Laboratory.  While serving as the dean of engineering from 1959 to 1968, he initiated programs to restructure the teaching of engineering, mimicking changes he accomplished earlier as the head of the Department of Electrical Engineeringin 1952.  Brown received several honorary degrees as well as the President’s Certificate of Merit, the George Westinghouse Award, and the Medal in Electrical Engineering Education from the American Institute of Electrical Engineers.  (http://web.mit.edu/newsoffice/nr/1996/42553.html; http://www-tech.mit.edu/V116/N36/brown.36n.html; http://bachman.mit.edu/AY96-97/announcements/1.html.)

Brusch, John
MC 100
Recombinant DNA History Collection

(1943 - )  Brusch received a BS in 1965 and an MD in 1969, both from Tufts University.  From 1974 to 1976, he served as a resident in infectious disease at the New England Medical Center and in 1976 as an assistant chief of medicine at the Brighton Public Health Service Hospital.  Brown was a researcher in infectious disease and a member of the Cambridge Experimentation Board.  (The Complete Marquis Who's Who. Marquis Who's Who, 1999;  MC 100)

Buchanan, Jack
MC 55
Interviewed by Walter Rosenblith & Elting Morison;
with Killian & Schmitt, 3/30/83

Bullock, Theodore
MC 226
Francis O. Schmitt Oral History of Neuroscience Project, 1986

(1915 - )  Bullock received an AB in 1936 and a PhD in 1940, both from the University of California, Berkeley.  From 1944 to 1957, he served as an instructor and as the head of zoology at the Marine Biology Laboratory in Woods Hole, Massachusetts.  At the University of California, Bullock became a professor of neurology in 1955 and professor emeritus in 1982.  Currently, he is doing research at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography.
(The Complete Marquis Who's Who. Marquis Who's Who, 1999;  http://siograddept.ucsd.edu/Web/sioteachingstaff.html.)

Burnett, J. Paul
MC 100
Recombinant DNA History Collection

Bush, Vannevar
MC 143
Oral history, 1964

(1890 – 1974)  Bush received a BS and an MS from Tufts University in 1913, and a doctorate in engineering jointly from MIT and Harvard University in 1916.  He joined the faculty of MIT in 1919 as an associate professor of electrical power transmission, becoming a full professor in 1923 and vice president and dean of engineering in 1932.  At MIT, Bush developed the differential analyzer, improved on the design of vacuum tubes, and invented the justifying typewriter.  In 1939, he became president of the Carnegie Institution.  He was appointed chairman of the National Defense Research Committee in 1940 and two years later he was appointed president of the Office of Scientific Research and Development where he oversaw the development of radar and the atomic bomb.  After retiring from the Carnegie Institute in 1955, he returned to MIT and served as the chairman of the Corporation in 1957.  He was awarded the National Medal of Science in 1964 and the Atomic Pioneers Award in 1970.  He also co-founded the Raytheon Corporation, originally called the American Appliance Company, in 1922. (World of Invention, 2nd ed. Gale Group, 1999; Notable Twentieth-Century Scientists. Gale Research, 1995; Encyclopedia of World Biography, 2nd ed. 18 vols. Gale Research, 1998; Contemporary Authors Online. The Gale Group, 1999.)

C

Cape, Ronald
MC 100
Recombinant DNA History Collection

(1932 - )  Cape received an AB in chemistry from Princeton University in 1953, an MBA from Harvard University in 1955, and a PhD in biochemistry from McGill University in 1967.  From 1972 to 1991, Cape worked at the biotech company Cetus Corporation serving as president from 1972 to 1978 and as chairman of the board from 1978 to 1991.  In addition to Cetus, Cape has worked at Profile Pharmaceutical and Merck and Company.  (The Complete Marquis Who's Who. Marquis Who's Who, 1999.)

Carr, John W., III
MC 131
Computers at MIT Oral History Collection, 1976-1977

(1924 – 1997)  Carr received a BA from Duke University in 1943, an MS from MIT in 1949, and a PhD from MIT in 1951.  He taught at a number of universities including the University of Michigan, the University of North Carolina, and the University of Pennsylvania, which he joined in 1963, and was named emeritus professor in 1993.  His teachings focused on learning theories and Very Large Scale Integration design.  He was also a visiting professor at the Mathematisch Centrum and at the University of Sydney.  Carr helped to establish a computer laboratory for the Egyptian Air Force Academy and was a member of many societies including the IEEE, Sigma Xi, and Phi Beta Kappa.  He was also the founding editor of the Journal of Computer Languages.  (http://www.upenn.edu/almanac/v43/n30/deaths.html; University of Pennsylvania Almanac.)

Cathou, Renata
MC 356
MIT Alumnae Oral History Collection

(1935 - )  Cathou received a BS in 1957 and a PhD in 1963, both from MIT.  She is a member of the AAAS, American Society of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, and the American Association of Immunologists.  She has held research positions at MIT, Harvard University, and Massachusetts General Hospital as well as a teaching position at the School of Medicine at Tufts University.  She accepted a professorship at Tufts in 1983 and was a member of the editorial board of Immunochemistry from 1972 to 1975.  (The Complete Marquis Who's Who. Marquis Who's Who, 1999.)

Charney, Jule Gregory
83-25  
Oral history, August 25-28, 1980.

(1917 – 1981)  Charney received an AB in mathematics in 1938, an MA in mathematics in 1940, and a PhD in meteorology in 1946, all from the University of California at Los Angeles.  From 1948 to 1956, he worked at the Institute for Advanced Study as the director of theoretical meteorology.  It was work here that lead him to helping to establish the first numerical weather prediction unit in the US Weather Bureau in 1954.  From 1956 to 1981, Charney was a professor of meteorology at MIT where he did research on the dynamics of atmospheres and oceans.  Charney was the chair of the National Research Council’s Panel on International Meteorological Cooperation from 1963 to 1966 and the chair of the US Committee of the Global Atmospheric Research Program from 1968 to 1971.  (http://www.agu.org/inside/awards/charney.html; http://sdcd.gsfc.nasa.gov/DIV-NEWS/POST.NAMES/charney.html.)

Chedd, Graham
MC 100
Recombinant DNA History Collection

Cherniss, Harold
MC 85
J. Robert Oppenheimer Oral history Collection, 1975-1976

Christenson
Museum 
Biographical interview by Bill Stuckey, 1970

Chung-Wu
Museum 
Biographical interview by Bill Stuckey, 1970

Churchill, Jack
77-110
Physical Science Study Committee Oral History Collection, 1956-1976

Clem, David
MC 100
Recombinant DNA History Collection

Cohen, Stanley
MC 100
Recombinant DNA History Collection

Colcord, Frank
MC 130
MIT-California Division of Highways Project Oral History Collection, 1975

Comunale, Francis
MC 100
Recombinant DNA History Collection

Craig, Thomas
MC 100
Recombinant DNA History Collection

Crain, William R., Jr.
MC 100
Recombinant DNA History Collection

Crockett, David C.
MC 226
Francis O. Schmitt Oral History of Neuroscience Project, 1986

Cross, Judson
77-110
Physical Science Study Committee Oral History Collection, 1956-1976

Curtiss, Roy, III
MC 100
Recombinant DNA History Collection

(1934 - )  Curtiss received a BS in agriculture from Cornell University in 1956 and a PhD in microbiology from the University of Chicago in 1962.  He taught at the University of Alabama, Birmingham, from 1972 to 1983 where he did research in recombinant DNA.  He is a member of the American Academy of Microbiology, the Genetics Society of America, the World Health Organization, and the International Society of Vaccines.  He served as the editor of the Journal of Bacteriology from 1970 to 1976, the editor of Infection and Immunity from 1985 to 1992, and the editor of Escherichia coli and Salmonella: Cellular and Molecular Biology from 1993 to 1996.  (The Complete Marquis Who's Who. Marquis Who's Who, 1999.)

D

Dach, Leslie
MC 100
Recombinant DNA History Collection

Davis, William D.
MC 100
Recombinant DNA History Collection

Davis, Hallowell
MC 226
Francis O. Schmitt Oral History of Neuroscience Project, 1986

Davis, Ronald
MC 100
Recombinant DNA History Collection

Davison, Peter
MC 226
Francis O. Schmitt Oral History of Neuroscience Project, 1986

Dean, Robert
Museum 
Interviewed by Kimberly Shilland, 4/13/93

Dickson, William R. Online transcript available (PDF)
MC 637
(1935-2006) Dickson, MIT Class of 1956, Director of Physical Plant, then Senior Vice President, in conversations with members of MIT's administration, discusses the growth of the MIT campus in the latter half of the 20th century.

Diehl, Carolyn
MC 226
Francis O. Schmitt Oral History of Neuroscience Project, 1986

Dodge, Bertha Sanford Wiener
MC 356
MIT Alumnae Oral History Collection

Drake, Elisabeth
MC 356
MIT Alumnae Oral History Collection

Drake received an SB in chemical engineering in 1958 and an ScD in chemical engineering in 1966, both from MIT.  She spent a large part of her career at Arthur D. Little Inc. as a cryogenic engineer testing experiments for the Apollo lunar surface project.  In the 1970s, she became vice president and the leader of their Environment, Health and Safety Practice division.  From 1982 to 1986, she served as a professor of chemical engineering at Northeastern University.  Since 1990, she has served as the associate director for new technologies at the MIT Energy Laboratory.  She is a fellow of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers and a member of the National Academy of Engineering.  (http://web.mit.edu/energylab/www/se/lis.html.)

Draper, Charles Stark
(1) MC 134
Oral history collection, 1976

(2) Museum 
Biographical interview by Bill Stuckey, 1970

(1901 – 1986)  Draper received a BS in electrical engineering in 1926, an MS in aeronautical engineering in 1928, and an ScD in physics in 1938, all from MIT.  After graduating, he remained at MIT becoming a professor in 1939, Institute Professor in 1966, and professor emeritus in 1970.  He served as the head of the aeronautical engineering department from 1951 to 1966. In 1939, Draper joined MIT’s Instrumentation Laboratory where his research lead to the development of the Mark 14 gun sight.  After World War II, Draper continued as head of the laboratory where he developed various inertial guidance systems that were used for the Apollo missions and the first autopilot experiments.  He served as director of the lab from 1970 to 1973.  In 1988, the lab was renamed the Charles Stark Draper Laboratory.  Some of Draper’s awards include the Holley Medal of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers in 1971, the National Medal of Science in 1964, and the Foundation Medal of the National Academy of Engineering in 1970.   (Notable Twentieth-Century Scientists. Gale Research, 1995; The Complete Marquis Who's Who. Marquis Who's Who, 1999.)

Dresselhaus, Mildred Spiewak
(1) MC 86
Women in Science and Engineering Oral History

(2) Audio-Visual Services

(1930 - )  Dresselhaus received a BA from Hunter College in 1951, an MA from Radcliffe College in 1953, and a PhD in physics from the University of Chicago in 1958.  While working at MIT’s Lincoln Laboratory from 1960 to 1967, Dresselhaus conducted research in low temperature semiconductors and semimetals.  In 1967, she became a professor at MIT serving as the associate head for electrical science and engineering in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science from 1972 to 1974 and as director of Material Science and Engineering from 1977 to 1983.  In 1985, she was named Institute Professor.  Among the awards she has received are the Society of Women Engineers Annual Achievement Award in 1977, the Ann Achievement Award in 1988, and the National Medal of Science in 1990.  (Notable Twentieth-Century Scientists. Gale Research, 1995; The Complete Marquis Who's Who. Marquis Who's Who, 1999.)

Dubridge, Lee
MC 226
Francis O. Schmitt Oral History of Neuroscience Project, 1986

(1904 – 1994)  DuBridge received an AB from Cornell College in 1922, an AM from the University of Wisconsin in 1924, and a PhD from the University of Wisconsin in 1926.  From 1940 to 1945, DuBridge served as director of MIT’s Radiation Laboratory.  Afterwards, he served as the president of the California Institute of Technology from 1946 to 1969.  While there, he was able to expand the faculty and physical grounds of the Institute.  DuBridge also taught at Washington University and the University of Rochester and served as the chairman of the President’s Science Advisory Committee from 1951 to 1958.  (The Complete Marquis Who's Who. Marquis Who's Who, 1999.)

Dunham, Neil
MC 130
MIT-California Division of Highways Project Oral History Collection, 1975

Dworkin, Roger
MC 100
Recombinant DNA History Collection

(1943 - )  Dworkin received an AB from Princeton University in 1963 and a JD from Stanford University in 1966.  In 1968, Dworkin began teaching at Indiana University as an associate law professor.  In 1974 he accepted a professorship and continues to teach there today.  (The Complete Marquis Who's Who. Marquis Who's Who, 1999.)

E

Ebert, James
MC 226
Francis O. Schmitt Oral History of Neuroscience Project, 1986

(1921 - )  Ebert received an AB from Washington and Jefferson College in 1942 and a PhD  from John Hopkins University in 1950.  For a brief period from 1950 to 1951, Ebert served as a biology instructor at MIT.  Afterwards, he taught at Indiana University where he became a professor in 1963.  From 1956 to 1976, he served as the director of the Department of Embryology at the Carnegie Institution and as president of the Institution from 1978 to 1987.  Currently he is a professor of biology at John Hopkins University.  He has authored the books The Chick Embryo in Biological Research, Aspects of Synthesis and Order in Growth, and Mechanisms of Cell Change.  (The Complete Marquis Who's Who. Marquis Who's Who, 1999.)

Edgerton, Harold E.
(1) MC 132
Oral history collection, 1975.

(2) MC 55
Interviewed by Walter Rosenblith & Elting Morison;
with Benedict & Zacharias, 4/23/84

(3) Museum 
Reminiscences

(1903 – 1990)  Edgerton received a BS from Nebraska University in 1925, an SM from MIT in 1927, and an ScD from MIT in 1931.  During the 1920s, Edgerton worked at the Nebraska Light and Power Company and at General Electric.  In 1932, he began teaching at MIT, becoming a professor in 1948 and Institute Professor in 1966.  While at MIT, Edgerton perfected his stroboscope and developed high–speed cameras allowing for the first time the filming of high-speed events.  This work also lead him to develop sonar equipment which was used to find the sunken ships the USS Monitor and HMS Britannic.  In 1940, Edgerton collaborated on an Oscar-winning film, Quicker Than a Wink, and during World War II, he was commissioned to design a strobe lamp for nighttime aerial photography.  In 1973, Edgerton received the National Medal of Science and in 1986 he was inducted into the National Invetors Hall of Fame.  (Notable Twentieth-Century Scientists. Gale Research, 1995; The Complete Marquis Who's Who. Marquis Who's Who, 1999; Contemporary Authors Online. The Gale Group, 1999.)

Edsall, John T.
(1) MC 85
J. Robert Oppenheimer Oral history Collection, 1975-1976

(2) MC 226
Francis O. Schmitt Oral History of Neuroscience Project, 1986

(1902 - )  Edsall received an AB in 1923 and an MD in 1928, both from Harvard University.  He began teaching at Harvard University in 1932, becoming a professor of biological chemistry in 1951 and professor emeritus in 1973.  He authored the books Proteins, Amino Acids, and Peptides in 1943 and Biophysical Chemistry in 1958. (The Complete Marquis Who's Who. Marquis Who's Who, 1999.)

Everett, Robert R.
MC 131
Computers at MIT Oral History Collection, 1976-1977

(1921 - )  Everett received a BS in electrical engineering from Duke University in 1942 and an MS in electrical engineering from MIT in 1943.  From 1943 to 1951, Everett worked at the Servomechanism Laboratory at MIT where he participated in Project Whirlwind.  In 1951, Everett transferred to MIT’s Lincoln Laboratory where he worked until 1958, when he began work at the MITRE Corporation serving as its president from 1969 to 1986.  (The Complete Marquis Who's Who. Marquis Who's Who, 1999; http://theory.lcs.mit.edu/classes/6.972/Core%20Report.htm.)

F

Falkow, Stanley
MC 100
Recombinant DNA History Collection

(1934 - )  Falkow received a BS in bacteriology from the University of Maine in 1955, an MS in biology from Brown University in 1960, and a PhD from Brown University in 1961.  From 1963 to 1966, Falkow worked at the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research in Washington as an assistant chief of bacterial immunology and from 1966 to 1981, he was professor at the Medical School of Georgetown University and at the University of Washington.  In 1981, he joined the faculty of Stanford University where he is still a professor of microbiology.  Falkow is recognized for his work related to the molecular mechanisms of bacterial pathogenesis.  He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and since 1997 the president of the American Society for Microbiology.  (http://www.stanford.edu/dept/news/pr/96/
961023aaasfellow.htmlThe Complete Marquis Who's Who. Marquis Who's Who, 1999.)

Fernandez, Hugo
MC 226
Francis O. Schmitt Oral History of Neuroscience Project, 1986

Finlay, Gilbert
77-110
Physical Science Study Committee Oral History Collection, 1956-1976

Fisher, Robert
MC 130
MIT-California Division of Highways Project Oral History Collection, 1975

Folk, William
MC 100
Recombinant DNA History Collection

Folk received a BA from Rice University in 1966 and a PhD from Stanford University in 1970.  For most of his career, he has been an educator in biochemistry serving professorships at the University of Michigan from 1982 to 1984, the University of Texas from 1984 to 1988, and the University of Missouri from 1989 to present where he is also the chairman of biochemistry.  He is a member of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Society for Microbiology, and the American Chemical Society.  (http://www.biochem.missouri.edu/faculty/folkcv.pdf)

Forrester, Jay W.
(1) MC 131
Computers at MIT Oral History Collection, 1976-1977

(2) Museum
Biographical interview by Bill Stuckey, 1970

(1918 - )  Forrester received a BSc from the University of Nebraska in 1939 and an SM from MIT in 1945.  In 1940, Forrester co-founded the Servomechanisms Laboratory at MIT and worked there until 1944 developing electric and hydraulic servomechanisms for gun mounts and radar.  From 1944 to 1951, he served as the supervisor of the Whirlwind digital computer project which lead to the development of magnetic core memory.  From 1951 to 1956, he worked at MIT’s Lincoln Laboratory for Air Defense developing the SAGE system.  In 1956, Forrester accepted a professorship at the Sloan School of Management where he pioneered the field of system dynamics using computer simulations and served as the director of the System Dynamics Program until 1989.  In 1989, he became professor emeritus at MIT.  Forrester also founded the Digital Computer Laboratory at MIT .  (The Complete Marquis Who's Who. Marquis Who's Who, 1999; World of Invention, 2nd ed. Gale Group, 1999; Notable Twentieth-Century Scientists. Gale Research, 1995; http://web.mit.edu/museum/fun/memory.html)

Frank, Nathaniel
77-110
Physical Science Study Committee Oral History Collection, 1956-1976

Franks, Barbara
MC 100
Recombinant DNA History Collection

Freeman, Margaret Zaroodny
MC 86
Women in Science and Engineering Oral History

Friedman, Theodore
MC 100
Recombinant DNA History Collection

G

Graham, Saundra
MC 100
Recombinant DNA History Collection

Graham served as a Cambridge City Councilor from 1971 to 1977.  She then went on to be a Massachusetts State Representative in 1977.  (Who's Who Among African Americans, 12th ed. Gale Group, 1999.)

Gray, George
MC 130
MIT-California Division of Highways Project Oral History Collection, 1975

Gray, Paul
MC 55
Interviewed by Walter Rosenblith & Elting Morison, 2/6/84

(1932 - )  Gray received an SB in 1954, an SM in 1955, and an ScD in 1960, all from MIT.  From 1971 to 1980, he served as chancellor of MIT under then president Jerome Weisner.   During the next decade he served at president of MIT and in 1990, he became chairman of MIT.  He retired from that position in 1997 to teach full time.  Gray has been a professor of electrical engineering at MIT since 1957.  Aside from two years in the army, Gray has been at MIT since 1950.  (http://www-tech.mit.edu/V116/N28/gray.28n.htmlThe Complete Marquis Who's Who. Marquis Who's Who,  1999.)

Grobstein, Clifford
MC 100
Recombinant DNA History Collection

(1916 - 1998)  Grobstein received a BS from the City College of New York in 1936, and an MA and PhD from the University of California at Los Angeles in 1938 and 1940.  He is generally held to be a pioneer in modern developmental biology where he focused on prenatal development.  From 1965 to 1998, he taught at the University of California, San Diego, where he served in the positions of chairman of the Department of Biology, dean and vice president of the School of Medicine, and professor emeritus of biology and public policy.  He was a member of the AAAS, the International Institute of Embryology, and the National Academy of Sciences. (The Complete Marquis Who's Who. Marquis Who's Who, 1999; http://ucsdnews.ucsd.edu/scirep/sciv3n2.htm.)

Gross, Jerome
MC 226
Francis O. Schmitt Oral History of Neuroscience Project, 1986

(1917 - )  Gross received a BS from MIT in 1939 and an MD from New York University in 1943.  In 1969, Gross became a professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School and in 1987, professor emeritus.  From 1946 to 1955, he was a research associate at MIT, and from 1989 to 1991, he was the associate director of Cutaneous Biology Research at Massachusetts General Hospital.  (The Complete Marquis Who's Who. Marquis Who's Who, 1999.)

H

Haber-Schaim, Uri

77-110
Physical Science Study Committee Oral History Collection, 1956-1976

Halvorson, Harlyn
MC 100
Recombinant DNA History Collection

(1925 - )  Halvorson received a BS and an MS from the University of Minnesota in 1948 and 1950, and a PhD in bacteriology from the University of Illinois in 1952.  In 1965, he began working at the Marine Biological Laboratory at Woods Hole where until 1992 he served as an instructor of physiology and microbial ecology, a trustee, and president from 1987 to 1992.  From 1971 to 1987, he served as a professor of biology and as the director of the Rosentiel Basic Medical Sciences Research Center at Brandeis University.  He also served as the vice president of the American Academy of Microbiology from 1975 to 1976 and as its president from 1976 to 1977.  (The Complete Marquis Who's Who. Marquis Who's Who, 1999.)

Hamburger, Victor
MC 226
Francis O. Schmitt Oral History of Neuroscience Project, 1986

(1900 - )  Hamburger received a PhD from the University of Freiburg in 1925.  Considered the founding father of developmental neurobiology, Hamburger first taught at University of Chicago before moving on to teach at Washington University in 1935.  By 1941 at Washington University, he was a professor of zoology and chairman of that department, a position he held until 1966.  There he did extensive research with Italian neurobiologist Rita Levi-Montalcini into the development of the nervous systems of chicken embryos.  In 1968, he became professor emeritus.  He was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 1953 for developing microsurgery techniques, and in 1989, he was awarded the National Medal of Science. (The Complete Marquis Who's Who. Marquis Who's Who, 1999; Notable Twentieth-Century Scientists. Gale Research, 1995.)

Harbison, John
MC 353
Interview on WMBR MIT radio, 4/9/86

(1938 - )  Harbison received a BA in 1960 from Harvard University and an MFA in 1963 from Princeton University.  Harbison joined the faculty of MIT in 1969, becoming a full professor in 1979 and Institute Professor in 1995.  In 1987, he received the Pulitzer Prize for his composition The Flight Into Egypt.  He has also served as the conductor of the Speculum Mausicae, the Boston Symphony Orchestra, the Los Angeles Philharmonic Orchestra, and as the composer in residence for the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra. Other honors he has received are the Kennedy Center-Friedheim Award in 1980, a MacArthur Fellowship in 1989, and the Killian Award in 1994.  He has composed in many different genre ranging from solos to symphonic music.  (http://web.mit.edu/afs/athena.mit.edu/org/m/mta/www/
newmusic/resources/jharbison.html
http://web.mit.edu/newsoffice/tt/1994/apr27/36020.htmlhttp://web.mit.edu/newsoffice/tt/1995/40249/40276.html)

Hardy, Harriet
MC 133
MIT Committee on the Use of Humans as Experimental Subjects Oral History Collection, 1976

(1905 – 1993)  Hardy graduated from Wellesley College in 1928 and received an MD from Cornell University in 1932.  She is known for her pioneering work in occupational medicine, identifying in 1940s the respiratory illness berylliosis.  In 1939, she became the director of health education at Radcliffe College.  In 1947, she established a clinic of occupational medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital which she directed for 24 years.  She became the first women to be appointed to a professorship at Harvard Medical School in 1971.  She was named Woman of the Year by the American Medical Women’s Association in 1955.  (Encyclopedia of World Biography, 2nd ed. 17 Vols. Gale Research, 1998.)

Haselkorn, Robert
MC 100
Recombinant DNA History Collection

(1934 - )  Haselkorn received an AB from Princeton University in 1956 and a PhD from Harvard University in 1959.  In 1961, he joined the falculty of the University of Chicago as an assistant professor of biophysics and in 1984, he became a full professor.  He has done research dealing with recombinant DNA and virology.  In 1974, he received the Quantrell Award for outstanding undergraduate teaching at the University of Chicago where he still serves in the chemistry department.  He is a member of the AAAS and the International Society of Plant Molecular Biology of which he served as its president from 1987 to 1989.  (The Complete Marquis Who's Who. Marquis Who's Who, 1999; 
http://www-news.uchicago.edu/resources/quantrell/list.html)

Haskins, Elizabeth Morgan
MC 86
Women in Science and Engineering Oral History

Hayes, Daniel
MC 100
Recombinant DNA History Collection

Hazen, Harold L.
MC 131
Computers at MIT Oral History Collection, 1976-1977

Heckroth, Heinz
MC 130
MIT-California Division of Highways Project Oral History Collection, 1975

Helinski, Donald R.
MC 100
Recombinant DNA History Collection

Henderson, Ellen Jane
MC 86
Women in Science and Engineering Oral History

Henderson received a BS in 1966 and a PhD in biochemistry in 1971, both from Purdue University.  Following Purdue, she did her postdoctoral at the University of Edinburgh from 1971 to 1974 before serving as an assistant professor of chemistry at MIT from 1974 to 1980.  While at MIT, she was elected to the Women’s Advisory Group and served as the chemistry department’s affirmative action officer.  In 1980, Henderson left for Georgetown where she is a professor and chair of the biology department.  She is a fellow of the AAAS and has received the National Science Foundation FAW Career Recognition Award.  (http://www.georgetown.edu/departments/biology/faculty/
henderso.html
; MC 86)

Herzenberg, Caroline
MC 356
MIT Alumnae Oral History Collection

(1932 - )  Herzenburg received a BS from MIT in 1953, and an SM and PhD from the University of Chicago in 1955 and 1958.  From 1961 to 1967, Herzenburg was an assistant professor at the Illinois Institute of Technology where she was later named research physicist in 1967 and senior physicist in 1970.  During this time, she also served as a principal investigator of NASA’s Apollo Returned Lunar Sample Analysis Program.  After teaching at IIT, she left for the Argonne National Laboratory where she served as a physicist and remains there today.  Herzenberg has done much work compiling information about women scientists and publicizing their roles in science throughout time.  She is a fellow of the American Physical Society and was the first women scientist to be inducted into the Chicago Women’s Hall of Fame in 1989.  (Notable Twentieth-Century Scientists. Gale Research,  1995; The Complete Marquis Who's Who. Marquis Who's Who, 1999.)

Hill, Stuart
MC 130
MIT-California Division of Highways Project Oral History Collection, 1975

Hodge, Alan
MC 226
Francis O. Schmitt Oral History of Neuroscience Project, 1986

Hollister, Walter
Audio-Visual Services
Roundtable with R. Seamans & L. Bucciarelli, 1997

Holman, Halsted
MC 100
Recombinant DNA History Collection

(1925 - )  Holman received an MD from Yale University in 1949.  From 1955 to 1960, he was a staff physician at the Rockefeller Institute.  In 1960, he joined the faculty at Stanford University as a professor of immunology and rheumatology.  Since 1997, he has served as the director of the Stanford Program for the Management of Chronic Disease and as the co-chief of the division of immunology and rhematology.  He has also authored two books.  (The Complete Marquis Who's Who. Marquis Who's Who, 1999.)

Horgan, Paul
MC 85
J. Robert Oppenheimer Oral history Collection, 1975-1976

Horn, Dean H.
MC 89
Ocean Engineering Oral History Collection, 1962-1976

Hubbard, Ruth
MC 100
Recombinant DNA History Collection

(1924 - )  Hubbard received an AB in 1944 and a PhD in 1950, both from Radcliffe College.  She was awarded a John Simon Guggenheim Fellowship in 1952 to work at the Carlsberg Laboratory at the University of Copenhagen until 1953.  While working toward her PhD and afterwards, when she became a research associate at Harvard University in 1958, Hubbard did research dealing with the biochemistry of vision.  In 1967, Hubbard and her husband George Wald were co-recipiants of the Paul Karrer Medal of the University of Zurich.  Hubbard has also authored many books on women’s issues and on the sociology and history of science.  In 1973, she became the first woman to receive tenure at Harvard University.  She was also a visiting professor at MIT in 1972.  Today she is professor emeritus at Harvard.  (The Complete Marquis Who's Who. Marquis Who's Who, 1999; Notable Women Scientists. Gale Group, 2000.)

I

Iversen, Leslie
MC 226
Francis O. Schmitt Oral History of Neuroscience Project, 1986

J

Jackson, Harry
Museum 
Interviewed by Maria Christianson, spring 1999

(1916 - ) Jackson received a BS in naval architecture and marine engineering at the University of Michigan in 1940.  In 1935, Jackson enlisted in the Naval Reserves and during World War II he supervised the repairs of battle damaged ships.  Jackson’s expertise lies in submarine design; he has worked on the design of Barbel and Thresher class submarines.  He has published numerous technical papers and is a senior lecturer for Naval Construction and Engineering in the Department of Ocean Engineering at MIT.  (http://web.mit.edu/13A/www/fac_stud/jackson.html.)

Jackson, David
MC 100
Recombinant DNA History Collection

Jacob, Francois
MC 100
Recombinant DNA History Collection

(1920 - )  Jacob received an MD in 1947 from the University of Paris and a Doctor of Science degree from the Sorbonne in 1954.  Shortly after, he joined the Pasteur Institute, becoming the head of the department of Cellular Genetics in 1960.  Jacob made a series of major contributions to the field of genetics such as the formulation of the Jacob-Monod operon model and the discovery of mRNA.  In 1962, Jacob received the Charles Leopold Mayer Prize of the French Academy of Sciences and in 1965, he shared the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine with Jacques Monod.  He also wrote a number of scientific articles and authored the books The Logic of Life: A History of Heredity and The Possible and the Actual.  (Notable Twentieth-Century Scientists. Gale Research, 1995.)

Jacobson, George
MC 100
Recombinant DNA History Collection

Jansen, Christina Huk
MC 86
Women in Science and Engineering Oral History

Jansen received a BS in 1963, an MS in 1966, and a PhD in 1971, all from MIT.  After receiving her PhD, Jansen worked for the Polaroid Corporation where she served as a scientist in a laboratory developing instant color movie film.  Later at Polaroid, she was promoted to supervisor and then manager.  She then worked as an engineering manager at Ventron.  Jansen was active in the Association for Women Students at MIT during her undergraduate years and upon graduating set up her own women’s consciousness raising group in 1971.  (MC 86)

Jasper, Herbert
MC 226
Francis O. Schmitt Oral History of Neuroscience Project, 1986

(1906 – 1999)  Jasper received a BA from Reed College in 1927, an MA from the University of Oregon in 1929, and a PhD from the University of Iowa in 1931.  Jasper worked in the fields of neurology and electroencephalography, developing at Brown University in 1933 a device that amplified brain signals allowing them to be recorded.  After Brown, Jasper taught at the University of Montreal, becoming professor emeritus in 1976.  There he established the Center for Neurological Science and the Council for Medical Research.  Among some of the honors he has received are the Albert Einstein World Science Award, the Prix Scientifique Province de Quebec, and he is a decorated officer of the Order of Canada. (http://www.forum.umontreal.ca/numeros/1998-1999/
Forum99-03-29/article09.html
; The Complete Marquis Who's Who. Marquis Who's Who, 1999.)

Johnson, Albert
MC 100
Recombinant DNA History Collection

(1926 - )  Johnson received a BS from Colorado A and M College in 1949, and from the University of Colorado an MS in 1951 and a PhD in 1956.  In 1964, Johnson joined the faculty of San Diego State University as a professor of biology and ecology.  He also served as the dean of the College of Sciences from 1969 to 1979 and as vice president of academic affairs from 1979 to 1991.  In 1991, he became professor emeritus.  He is a member of the AAAS and the Artic Research Consortium of the US.  (The Complete Marquis Who's Who. Marquis Who's Who, 1999; http://www.bio.sdsu.edu/ecology/emeritus.html)

Johnson, Howard
(1) MC 226
Francis O. Schmitt Oral History of Neuroscience Project, 1986

(2) MC 55
Interviewed by W. Rosenblith & Elting Morison, 12/5/83

(1922 - ) Johnson received a BA in 1943 from Central College, and an MA in 1947 from the University of Chicago.  Johnson first came to MIT in 1955 as an associate professor and as the associate dean of the Sloan School where he helped run the Senior Executive Program.  In 1959, he became a full professor and the dean of the Sloan School.  From 1966 to 1971, he was president of MIT where he weathered campus protests against weapons development being done at MIT.  After his presidency, Johnson was chairman of the MIT Corporation from 1971 to 1983 and honorary chairman from 1983 to 1990.  Outside of MIT, Johnson has served as the chairman of the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, the vice president of Federated Department Stores, the president of the Boston Museum of Fine Arts, and as a trustee of Radcliffe and Wellesley Colleges. (The Complete Marquis Who's Who. Marquis Who's Who, 1999;  http://web.mit.edu/newsoffice/tt/1999/jun09/johnson.html; Library Journal, May 1, 1999, v124 i8 p92[1])

Johnson, Irving
MC 100
Recombinant DNA History Collection

Jones, Christine
MC 86
Women in Science and Engineering Oral History

Jones majored in astronomy at Radcliffe College and received an MA and PhD in astronomy fromHarvard University. After receiving her PhD, she was a postdoctoral fellow at the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory where she worked on the Uhuru Satellite project.  In 1974, she was appointed a junior fellow by the Harvard Society of Fellows.  (MC 86;
http://cfa-www.harvard.edu/postdoc/pdfellows.html
.)

K

Kaplan, Martin
MC 100
Recombinant DNA History Collection

(1915 - )  Kaplan received a VMD in 1940 and an MPH in 1942, both from the University of Pennsylvania.  In 1949, he joined the World Health Organization as chief veterinarian of public health where he served until 1976.  From 1976 to 1988, he was secretary general of the Pugwash Conference on Science and World Affairs at Geneva.  He has authored Laboratory Techniques in Rabies and edited Aspects of Chemical and Biological Weapons and Health Hazards of the Human Environment.  (The Complete Marquis Who's Who. Marquis Who's Who, 1999.)

Keil, Alfred A. H.
MC 89
Ocean Engineering Oral History Collection, 1962-1976.

(1913 - )  Keil received a doctorate of nautical science from the University of Breslau, Germany, in 1939.  Hel came to MIT in 1966 as a professor and head of the Department of Ocean Engineering.  From 1971 to 1977, he was dean of the School of Engineering and in 1978, he became professor emeritus.  Previous to MIT, he worked at the David Taylor Model Basin as a technical director from 1959 to 1966 and as the chief research scientist of underwater explosive research at the Norfolk Naval shipyard from 1947 to 1959.  He received the Gibbs Brothers Gold Medal for Naval Architecture in 1963.  (The Complete Marquis Who's Who. Marquis Who's Who, 1999.)

Kelly, Harry C.
77-117
Oral history collection, 1975

Kendrew, John
MC 100
Recombinant DNA History Collection

(1917 – 1997)  Kendrew received a BA in 1939, an MA in 1943, and a PhD in 1949, all from Trinity College, Cambridge, England.  In 1947, Kendrew became the chairman of the Medical Research Council Laboratory for Molecular Biology at Cambridge University, a position he held until 1975.  Kendrew and Max Perutz developed a technique to discover the structure of the protein myoglobin using x-ray methods.  In 1962, they were awarded the Nobel Prize in chemistry for their work.  From 1975 to 1982, Kendrew was the director general of the European Molecular Biology Laboratory.  He was the secretary general of the International Council of the Science Union from 1974 to 1980 and president from 1983 to 1988.  He also served as the editor in chief of the Journal of Molecular Biology from 1959 to 1987.  (The Complete Marquis Who's Who. Marquis Who's Who, 1999; Notable Twentieth-Century Scientists. Gale Research, 1995;  Encyclopedia of World Biography, 2nd ed. 17 Vols. Gale Research, 1998.)

Kety, Seymour
MC 226
Francis O. Schmitt Oral History of Neuroscience Project, 1986

(1915 - )  Kety received an AB in 1936 and an MD in 1940, both from the University of Pennsylvania.  Through his research, Kety made a series of contributions to neuroscience including the discovery of the genetic basis of schizophrenia and the development of methods for measuring blood flow in the brain.  He became the first director of the National Institute of Mental Health in 1951, where he worked until 1967 also serving as chief of the Laboratory of Clinical Science.  In 1967, he became a professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School, and in 1983 he became professor emeritus of neuroscience.  Among the honors he has received are the Lifetime Achievement Award from the International Society of Psychiatric Genetics and the Lasker Award for Special Achievement in Medical Science.  (The Complete Marquis Who's Who. Marquis Who's Who, 1999; http://www.news.harvard.edu/gazette/1999/09.30/lasker.html;  http://www.med.harvard.edu/publications/Focus/Oct1_1999/
awards.html)

Killian, James R.
(1) Museum 
interviewed for Technology Review, 10/16/79

(2) MC 55
Interviewed by Walter Rosenblith & Elting Morison;
with Schmitt & Buchanan, 3/30/83

MC 55
Interviewed by Walter Rosenblith & Elting Morison;
with Stever & Wiesner, 11/18/82

(1904 – 1988)  Killian received an SB in management from MIT in 1926.  He was the tenth president of MIT from 1949 to 1959 and chairman of the MIT Corporation from 1959 to 1971.  Previous to his presidency, Killian was managing editor of the Technology Review and executive assistant to MIT president Karl Compton.  As special assistant for science and technology to President Dwight D. Eisenhower from 1957 to 1959, he formed the President’s Scientific Advisory Committee which established NASA and initiated education curriculum changes in science and technology.  Other government advisory groups he has served on are President Truman’s Communications Policy Board, the Army Scientific Advisory Panel, and the President’s Foreign Intelligence Advisory Board.  From 1965 to 1967, Killian was chairman of the Carnegie Commission on Educational Television, which led to the implementation of public television.  He has authored Sputnik, Scientists and Eisenhower and The Education of a College President.  (http://libraries.mit.edu/archives/biographies-mc/killian.html)

Kimball, Alice H.
MC 356
MIT Alumnae Oral History Collection

King, Jonathan
MC 100
Recombinant DNA History Collection

(1941 - )  King received a BS from Yale University in 1963 and a PhD from the California Institute of Technology in 1968.  He joined the faculty of MIT in 1971 as an assistant professor.  In 1971, he became the director of the Biomedical Electron Microscopy Laboratory and in 1979 he became a professor of molecular biology.  He was a member of the Genetics and Society Group and Science for the People.  He has received the NIH Merit Award; he is a fellow of the AAAS and president of the Biophysical Society.  Today he is still director of the Biomedical Electron Microscopy Laboratory.  (The Complete Marquis Who's Who. Marquis Who's Who, 1999; http://web.mit.edu/king-lab/www/people/JKing/JKing.html.)

Kistiakowsky, Vera
MC 86
Women in Science and Engineering Oral History

(1928 - )  Kistiakowsky received a BA from Mt. Holyoke College in 1948 and a PhD in chemistry from the University of California in 1952.  After receiving her degree, she worked as a staff scientist at the US Naval Radiological Defense Laboratory from 1952 to 1953 and as a research associate at Columbia University, 1954 to 1957.  After serving as an associate professor of physics at Brandeis University from 1959 to 1963, she became a staff member of MIT’s Laboratory for Nuclear Science and in 1972 she became a professor at MIT in the physics department.  Kistiakowsky gained international recognition for her “backward charge exchange” experiment and for her work on women’s rights issues.  In 1971, she co-founded Women in Science and Engineering with Elizabeth Baranger.  In 1994 she became professor emerita.  (Notable Women Scientists. Gale Group, 2000; MC 86)

Kopell, Nancy
MC 86
Women in Science and Engineering Oral History

Kopell received an AB from Cornell University in 1963 and a PhD from the University of California at Berkeley in 1967.  From 1967 to 1969, Kopell was a C.L.E. Moore instructor of mathematics at MIT and in 1972 she went to Northeastern University as an associate professor with tenure.  In 1986, she became a professor at Boston University. She specializes in biomathematics.  (http://www.bu.edu/news/releases/2000/4-7-kopell.htm; MC 86)

Koppelman, Frank
MC 130
MIT-California Division of Highways Project Oral History Collection, 1975

Kourilsky, Philippe
MC 100
Recombinant DNA History Collection

(1942 - )  Kourilsky received a doctorate from l’Ecole Polytechnique.  In 1972, he joined the Institut Pasteur serving as the director of the Molecular Biology Unit in 1979 and as the director of research from 1992 to 1995.  He was named a professor at the Institute in 1993, and in 1998 he was also named a professor at the College de France where he is also the chair of Molecular Immunology.  In 1999, he became the general director of the Institut Pasteur.  He is a member of the Academy of Sciences.  (http://www.pasteur.fr/actu/presse/com/communiques/
Direction.html
; http://www.pasteur.fr/actu/presse/com/dossiers/Dir/
organi.html#PK
)

Krimsky, Sheldon
MC 100
Recombinant DNA History Collection

(1941 - )  Krimsky received a BS from the City University of New York in 1963, an MS from Purdue University in 1965, and a PhD from Boston University in 1970.  His research focuses on the links between science, ethics, and public policy.  He joined the faculty of Tufts University in 1974 as the director of the Urban Social Environmental policy program and in 1990, he became a full professor.  From 1978 to 1981, he served on the NIH’s Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee and is currently on the board of directors of the Council for Responsible Genetics.  He is also a fellow of the AAAS.  (http://www.tufts.edu/~skrimsky/bio.htmThe Complete Marquis Who's Who. Marquis Who's Who, 1999.)

Kutter, Elizabeth
MC 100
Recombinant DNA History Collection

L

Lee, Calvin
MC 130
MIT-California Division of Highways Project Oral History Collection, 1975

Lehmann, Betty Ann
MC 356
MIT Alumnae Oral History Collection

LeMessurier, William
MC 100
Recombinant DNA History Collection

(1926 - )  LeMessurier received an AB from Harvard University in 1947, and an SM from MIT in 1953.  In 1952, LeMessurier was a partner in the Goldberg-LeMessurier Association, and from 1973 to 1985, he was president of LeMessurier Associates.  LeMessurier has served as a structural engineer on a variety of buildings such as the Boston State Street Bank, the Boston Federal Reserve Bank, and the Citicorp building in New York City which was completed in 1977.  He was an instructor in the department of construction and engineering at MIT from 1951 to 1952 and a professor of architecture at Harvard University from 1956 to 1961.  He was also a member of the Cambridge Experimentation Review Board in 1978.  (The Complete Marquis Who's Who. Marquis Who's Who, 1999.;  http://www.onlineethics.com/text/moral/LeMessurier/2.html)

Lewis, Herman
MC 100
Recombinant DNA History Collection

Lewis, Andrew
MC 100
Recombinant DNA History Collection

(1934 - )  Lewis received a BA in 1956 and an MD in 1961, both from Duke University.  In 1963, he worked as a scientist at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and also served as the head of the viral pathogenesis section from 1986 to 1995.  Currently, he is the chief of the DNA virus laboratory at the Center for Biological Research and Evaluation of the FDA.  (The Complete Marquis Who's Who. Marquis Who's Who, 1999.)

Lewis, Howard
MC 100
Recombinant DNA History Collection

Liberman, Daniel
MC 100
Recombinant DNA History Collection

Lippe, Pamela
MC 100
Recombinant DNA History Collection

(1952 - )  Lippe received a BA from Hampshire College in 1977.  From 1976 to 1979, she worked for Friends of the Earth where she was a primary lobbyist for public interest and environmental groups concerned with recombinant DNA.  She was the founding director of the MUSE Foundation from 1979 to 1981 and CEO of Earth Day USA from 1993 to 1994.  Since 1994, she has served on the board of directors of the Earth Day Network.  (The Complete Marquis Who's Who. Marquis Who's Who, 1999.

Luria, Salvador
Museum
Biographical interview by Bill Stuckey, 1970

M

Maaloe, Ole
MC 100
Recombinant DNA History Collection

Madsen, Ole
MC 89
Ocean Engineering Oral History Collection, 1962-1976.

Manley, John H.
MC 85
J. Robert Oppenheimer Oral history Collection, 1975-1976

(1907 – 1990)  Manley received a BS from the University of Illinois in 1929 and a PhD from the University of Michigan in 1934.  Manley was a research associate at the Metallurgical Laboratory at the University of Chicago from 1937 to 1942 where scientists were working on achieving a nuclear reaction.  From 1942 to 1951, he served as a scientist and as the associate director of the Los Alamos National Laboratory.  There he did research dealing with fast neutrons and their interaction with various materials for Openheimer and the Manhattan Project.  In 1951, he joined the faculty of the University of Washington as a professor of physics and as an executive officer of the physics department, whre he remained until 1957.  (The Complete Marquis Who's Who. Marquis Who's Who, 1999.)

Marsh, David
MC 100
Recombinant DNA History Collection

McCullough, James M.
MC 100
Recombinant DNA History Collection

Melnechuk, Theodore
MC 226
Francis O. Schmitt Oral History of Neuroscience Project, 1986

Mertz, Janet
MC 100
Recombinant DNA History Collection

(1949 - )  Mertz received a BS from MIT in 1970 and a PhD in biochemistry from Stanford University in 1975.  During her graduate work at Stanford, Mertz worked in Paul Berg’s laboratory and participated in the Cold Spring tumor virus workshop in 1971.  In 1976, she joined the faculty of the University of Wisconsin as an assistant professor of oncology at the McArdle Laboratory for Cancer Research.  She became a full professor in 1992 and continues to work at the laboratory today.  (The Complete Marquis Who's Who. Marquis Who's Who, 1999;  http://mcardle.oncology.wisc.edu/faculty_staff/mertz_j.html.)

Milne, Walter
MC 100
Recombinant DNA History Collection

Morrison, Philip
77-110
Physical Science Study Committee Oral History Collection, 1956-1976

(1915 - )  Morrison received a BS from the Carnegie Institute of Technology in 1936 and a PhD in theoretical physics from the University of California, Berkeley, in 1940.  At the University of California, Morrison studied under J. Robert Oppenheimer with whom he later worked on the Manhattan Project at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory and at the Metallurgical Laboratory of the University of Chicago.  After teaching at Cornell University from 1946 to 1965, Morrison joined the faculty of MIT as a professor in the physics department.  In 1986, he became professor emeritus.  Morrison has spoken out on issues dealing with nuclear weapons and extraterrestrial intelligence.  His current research deals with high-energy astrophysics and extrasolar planets.  In 1994, he co-authored Powers of Ten with his wife, Phyllis Morrison.  Some of the honors Morrison has received are the Oersted Medal of the American Association of Physics Teachers, and the Klumpke-Robert Award of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific.  (Notable Twentieth-Century Scientists. Gale Research, 1995; The Complete Marquis Who's Who. Marquis Who's Who, 1999;  http://web.mit.edu/physics/people/philip_morrison.htm.)

Morse, Philip McCord
77-109
Lecture, "Personal reminiscences."
Given at Operations Research Center
Seminar, April 15, 1975.

(1903 – 1985)  Morse received a BS and an AM from the Case School of Applied Science in 1926 and 1927, and a PhD from Princeton University in 1929.  In 1931, he joined the faculty of MIT as an assistant professor of physics. He was on the MIT faculty for over fifty years, becoming a full professor in 1937, and professor emeritus in 1969. He was chairman of the faculty from 1958 to 1960.  He served as the first director of the Brookhaven National Laboratory from 1946 to 1948.  At MIT, Morse did research in underwater sound detection and acoustical science.  During World War II, he was the head of a civilian committee to evaluate the US anti-submarine program.  He has authored Vibration and Sound, Thermal Physics, and Methods of Operations Research.  (Contemporary Authors Online. The Gale Group, 1999; The Complete Marquis Who's Who. Marquis Who's Who, 1999.; http://web.mit.edu/physics/dept_overview/
historical_perspective.htm
)

Moulder, James
MC 100
Recombinant DNA History Collection

Moulton, Donald
MC 100
Recombinant DNA History Collection

Mountcastle, Vernon
MC 226
Francis O. Schmitt Oral History of Neuroscience Project, 1986

(1918 - )  Mountcastle received a BS in chemistry from Roanoke College in 1938 and an MD from Johns Hopkins University in 1942.  He joined the faculty of Johns Hopkins shortly after receiving his MD and has spent his entire career there.  In 1959, he became a professor of physiology and in 1992, professor emeritus of neuroscience.  From 1964 to 1980, he served as the director of the School of Medicine at Johns Hopkins.  Mountcastle is known for a series of discoveries that he made on how neurons work together and their connection to higher functions.  In 1998, he received the National Academy of Sciences’ Award in the Neurosciences for his achievements.  (The Complete Marquis Who's Who. Marquis Who's Who, 1999;  http://www.jhu.edu/~gazette/aprjun98/apr2098/20mount.html.)

Munzer, Martha E.
MC 356
MIT Alumnae Oral History Collection

(1899 – 1999)  Munzer was the first woman to receive a BS in electrochemical engineering from MIT in 1922.  She taught at the Fieldston School in Riverdale, New York, from 1930 to 1954.  In 1951, she published the first of the eleven books that she would eventually write.  Munzer was an advocate for conservation education through her writings.  Some of her books are Teaching Science Through Conservation, Full Circle, and Friends of the Everglades: A Living History.  (The Complete Marquis Who's Who. Marquis Who's Who, 1999; http://web.mit.edu/newsoffice/tt/1999/sep29/munzer.html) 


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